Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Author Message
Bookmark and Share
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #401
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Temple’s opponents averaged 70.9 points this season in conference play.

Yet, in non-conference play, Temple had held opponents low 60’s. Temple did so as it played it’s pressure defense then, but HC McKie for some inexplicable reasons did not do so in conference play. Such turned a winning record in non-conference games into a losing record in conference play.

In 15 non-conference games, opponents shot but 44 percent on two’s. Temple was then ranked 38th in the nation in 2-point defense. For the season Temple finished ranked 76th in the nation as opponents for the season wound up shooting 46.3 percent on two’s.

Temple was able to reduce it’s opponents two point shooting percentage from 52.2 percent last season in conference play to 47.6 percent in conference play this season. That’s quite an improvement. Temple’s Asst. Coach Ross, Temple’s defensive coach deserves credit for Temple’s improved defense.

With Temple holding opponents to shooting such low two point percentages both in non-conference and conference games, both far better than last year when Temple had a 23-10 season record, and a 13-5 conference record, one can see clearly that Temple would have had a comparable record, if not better, if only Temple’s offense had not faltered and declined as much as it did this season. And, as I argue later in that post, that did not nbedd to be.

Such improvement in Temple’s defense was mostly do Rose, Nate, and Perry, upping their defense from last year. Scott played better on defense that Shizz did. Hamilton statistically was Temple’s best interior defender but his play was limited in conference play. Temple’s improved defense was not do to D.Moore and Forrester playing the Center position as their defensive ratings were not good. Moorman’s defense slid a little from last season.

Opponents three point shooting was 30.4 percent in non-conference games this season. Such closely approximates what opponents shot on three’s in conference games. At one point in non-conference games, Temple was holding opponents to shooting 28.3 percent on three’s, and Temple was ranked 55th in the nation. Opponents finished the season shooting 31 percent on three’s which is ranked 69th best three-point shooting defense in the nation.

Opponents three-point shooting was 31.5 percent this year in conference play.

This past season in conference play opponents made 11 more three’s (33-points) than Temple did. This opponent advantage in shooting three’s is mostly do to Rose and Nate not shooting three’s well and Alani, and Perry not shooting as many three’s as they should have, Temple opponents making more three’s then Temple could have been reduced if stopping the three ball as they did in non-conference play,

In non-conference games, Temple made 52 more two’s, and scored 104 more points than opponents did.

The reverse was true in conference play as Temple’s opponents made 33 more two’s or 66 points in conference games, or 3 more three pointers points per conference game than Temple did.

As we’ve seen, both Rose shot 44 percent on two’s and Nate shot 48.8 on 2’s respectively in non-conference games when Temple played it’s pressure defense, and Rose shot but 38 percent and Nate big 40 percent when Temple did not play it’s pressure defense in conference games.

Rose’s two point shooting percentage shooting was awful the entire season, Nate’s just in conference play. Both shot but 31 percent on three’s in conference play. Such poor shooting caused Temple to average only 67 points in conference games. McKie should have reduced their playing time,, and tried different combination of better shooters like Perry and Scott, during periods within a conference game to see if Temple could score more points, with ought giving up more points. He did not.

I’m sure some of you think Temple would have done better and some think not. But the point is he should have tried to see. With Temple playing so poorly in conference games he had nothing to lose. Rather, he remained stubborn and continued to put a bad product on the floor.


Opponents foul line shooting in conference play was 74.1 percent. Temple shot 68.7 percent.Temple went to the foul-line more but only outscored it’s opponents by only two foul shots in conference play. Scott and Perry playing more minutes would have given Temple a larger margin in points scored at the foul-line. Temple made three more foul shots than opponents in conference play last season

What made Temple have a losing record in conference games, was a combination of Temple’s lack of offense, and that could have improved if Rose was not Temple’s ball distributor, and if players like Perry and Scott had both played and shot more, and Rose, Nate, and Moorman less. And Alani had shot more, especially three’s.

Temple’s excessive fouling also cost Temple some conference wins.

If Temple had played it’s pressure defense in conference play that would have made a big difference. One must remember that well into non-conference play that Temple was rated by Andy Katz as the 23rd best team in the nation, and Temple’s NCAA NET rating was no. 34 in the nation. It’s my view that Temple would have closely matched Temple’s 13-5 conference record last season McKie had tried the things I mentioned above.
(This post was last modified: 03-17-2020 03:10 PM by Miggy.)
03-14-2020 06:05 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #402
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
While I attribute Temple’s success in non-conference games to Temple playing a pressure defense, it did not employ it very often in those games. It was sometimes employed in first half of games, but mostly in second halves of games. Templem’s basic defense was good , but Temple’s pressure defense fueled it’s offense.

After scoring but 31 points in the first half of the Drexel game, Temple’s first game, Temple first employed it for a short period in the second half, and Temple went off for 39 points. As Temple’s defense created it’s offense.

Temple employed it pressure defense again in both halves of the Morgan State game, and scored 37 and 38 points in each half, holding Morgan State to just 57 points.

Temple employed it’s pressure defense at times in the first half of the La. Salle game, and outscored La Salle 37-22. Temple stopped playing it’s pressure defense, and let La Salle shoot the three ball in the second half, and La Salle went off for 47 points. Temple scored but 22 points in the second half. Coming out of this game, McKie should have realized that after three games, his starting line-up with Rose and Nate was awful, as it could not produce points unless it played a pressure defense.

Instead, he strayed with his starting line-up agains USC, and scored just 31 points in the first half. In the second half, he employed his pressure defense and outscored USC 39-31.

McKie employed his pressure defense in the first half against national ranked Maryland, and held them to 29 points. Temple led by 5-points at the half. In the second half, McKie did not apply it’s pressure defense, didn’t stop the three ball, and allowed Maryland to outscore Temple 47-35.

He applied his pressure defense somewhat against both Texas A and M and Davidson, and held them to scoring but 42 and 53 points respectively. But at the same time Temple scored but 65 and 66 po pints in those games.

Even though won 6 out of it’s first 7 games, Temple had only scored more than 70-points only once against lowly Morgan State, which should have been a red flag that Temple’s starting line-up needed to be upgraded or it’s pressure defense needed to played even more It wasn’t.

So, playing next against Missouri at home, Missouri beat Temple 64-54.

McKie would keep it’s starting line-up for the rest of the season, and scoring mostly in the 60’s. That’s no way to have a winning season. And not playing a pressure defense in conference games sealed Temple’s fate. An argument can be made that Temple should have used it more in non-conference play, by shuttling players in and out. Temple had a plethora of athlete’s who’s skills were not maximized.

McKie should of realized the short-comings of Rose and Nate. He didn’t. The only way they could have succeeded is if they played a pressure defense so they could force turnovers and score easily. Once he abandoned that and opponents started forcing more Temple turnovers than Temple defense did, a 6-12 conference record followed just as night follows day. Temple was a very good team that could play with any team in nation of utilized correctly. That didn’t happen in conference play.
(This post was last modified: 03-17-2020 02:00 PM by Miggy.)
03-15-2020 12:39 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #403
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Listening to a panel of Philly broadcasters grading Philly coaches. One gave McKie a”C” because Tempe’s were not his players, and Temple plays tough teams like Memphis. McKie did in fact recruit these players. The broadcaster implies that Temple players weren’t good.

Another broadcaster gave McKie a “C-“ because Temple players lacked skills as far as shooting and decision-making. That’s true for Rose, Nate, and some other players, but not for Alani, Scott and Perry who came off the bench, and did not play as much as they should have.

Another broadcaster gave McKie a “C-“, said he’s improved the defense, and brought in tougher players, and singled out Forrester as one of them. Agree that Temple’s defense tougher, disagree that Forrester is good as he fouls way to often, and turns the ball over on offense.

Do think McKie had talent, as witnessed by Temple’s winning at the start of the season, but often did not play players like Scott and Perry, who are better decisions makers and shooters as much as he should have. Plays for Alani to shoot more should have also been put-in.

Also, don’t think HC or staff coach-up and develop players. Hamilton is an example of that. Great athletic talent, but his skill set actually went down from last season. Mis-used on defense by having him stray from the rim, rather than protect the rim. McKie did that because of Hamilton’s lack of rebounding, when he should have been more concerned about baskets not being scored, and being aware he had Nate and others who could rebound.

Chose not to grade McKie although i have seen no indication he’s capable of doing a good job as HC he made bad decisions both at the beginning of the season as to who should start, and he didn’t make obvious needed changes in the line-up during the course of the season.

When you have a Temple team that holds non-conference opponents to shooting but 44 percent in non-conference play, as Temple did by playing a pressure defense army times, you have an elite defensive team. Probably worse Mckie decision was not having the team play like that in conference games.

Can’t cut him much slack for being a new HC as he’s been with the program a long time. Temple fans can decide that for themselves.
(This post was last modified: 03-15-2020 01:42 PM by Miggy.)
03-15-2020 01:33 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #404
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Looking back on Temple’s season it’s obvious that Perry should have played in Moorman’s stead as a starter, and played way more minutes than Moorman, not less as he did. HC McKie probably do the right thing because he had named Moorman one of Temple’s three co-captains.

When we compare to two it's obvious that Perry is a much better player. As Perry played in 25 games, and in 14 of those 25 games he made half his shots. He shot over half his shots as three’s, Moorman shot more than half his shots as two’s.

Moorman played in 29 games and only made half his shots in only 5 games. No player with such a poor stat should be playing significant minutes,, no less starting.

For the season, Perry also shot an outstanding 56.9 percent on two’s, 41.3 percent on three’s, and 85.7 percent from the foul-line. In conference play, Perry shot 59.1 percent on two’s, 34.4 percent on three’s, and 86.7 from the foul-line.

For the season, Moorman’s shooting percentages don’t even approach Perry’s outstanding percentages. In fact, Moorman’s shooting percentages are sub-par. As for the season, Moorman shot 41.4 on two’s, 29.4 percent on three’s, and 62.9 percent at the foul-line. season. In conference play, Moorman shot 47.1 percent on two’s, 26.5 percent on three’s, and 65.2 percent at the foul-line.

Statistically, Perry also had a better defensive rating than Moorman does.

Pery’s shooting percentages and higher defensive rating clearly show that not only should Perry have played more than Moorman but he should have started over Moorman.

It should not have been that Moorman averaged 26.8 mpg, and Perry only 17.6 mpg for the season. Perry should have been Temple’s starter, and should have also played way more minutes.

McKie knew early on about the wide disparity between Perry and Moorman’s stats. His decision to play Moorman over Perry seems to be based on favoritism, but the result was Temple losing games they should have won.

This and anothercdecision to allow Rose and Nate, Temple’s worse shooters, to take Temple’s most shots kept Temple from averaging more than 67 points in conference play, and from winning more games.

Mckie’s failure to play player’s properly in the face of obvious facts is mind-boggling. It’s for others to decide whether he should be Temple’s HC.
03-16-2020 08:59 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #405
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
While some might think that Temple did not have good team this past season, and Temple needs to improve it’s recruitment, in my judgment, Temple had a very good team this past season.

My belief is backed up by the fact that well into Temple’s non-conference play, Temple was ranked 23rd in the nation by basketball reporter Andy Katz. and 34th in the nation by the NCAA NET rating system. Even in conference play, Temple beat Wichita State when it was thenranked 16th in the nation.

As pointed out in prior posts, this Temple team was much better defensively than last season’s team that finished the season with a 23-10 record.

I believe Temple could have had a much better offense this season, if Perry and Scott took minutes from Moorman, Rose, and Nate.

While Rose and NPL mesmerized us with their outstanding athleticism, we all were well aware they made bad decisions as to when to drive to the hoop, and when not to. And neither were good finishers at the rim, and were poor shooters.

For me, both of them making the same mistakes over and over again told me they were not being coached-up very well.

I was present when Rose was asked two years ago if he drove to the hoop with his head up or down. He paused and first said he didn’t know,and then said he thought he did each at times. He was then told to always drive to the hoop with his eyes up, and to drive slower at times so he could step around defenders rather then crash and burn at the hoop. He nodded in agreement.

Seems like he had never been told these basic things before. One can also see from watching him play, he’s never been shown how to bring the ball up to bring the ball up toward the backboard so he wouldn’t misses wildly as he does.

How many times have we seen Nate rather then glance to see if there is a big man waiting for him inside, just decide to take it to the hoop only to crash and burn at the hoop or have his shot blocked.

Can see same thing in Josh who continued to foul players stupidly in the open court, and Forrester who fouls excessively.

Rose and Nate’s other deficiencies beside being bad decision-makers, as they’re are poor shooters. And no team can afford to have it’s two worse shooters taking it’s most shots as they do.

It irk’s me that Perry and Scott, Temple’s two best two-point shooters, (Perryn 59 percent), and Scott 54 percent in conference play) (Perry also a good three-point shooter) are also both good decision-makers with few turnovers, but they both played way less than Rose and Nate.

Temple definitely needs Nate’s defense and rebounding, but Temple would still need to play him 20-25 mpg, not 34 mpg as he did.

Temple definitely needs more points that Perry and Scott would have given Temple, and I don’t think Temple defense would have declined anywhere near as much as Temple’s scoring would have risen.

Not good when HC refuses the entire season to try to improve his team’s scoring.
(This post was last modified: 03-17-2020 08:56 PM by Miggy.)
03-17-2020 12:53 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #406
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Temple gets commit from class of 2020, 6’8” Nick Jourdain, from HS in New Jersey. Believe he had one other offer from Quinnipiac University.

Played for Immaculate Conception HS 2018-2019 in NJ, and spent an extra year at Covenant Prep in NJ, in 20-19-2020. Described as a good shooter, good offensive and defensive rebounder, has good bounce, and handles. Have questions about whether he fouls excessively, and foul-shooting ability.

Have not seen videos of him shooting so Incan’t comment on that. It’s clear he has length and is mobile, and had the ability to put the ball on floor without turning the ball over. Seems very coordinated, and looks like has a great wing-span. Looks like his stats really increased this past season playing for Covenant Prep.

He’s been described as a “rhythm shooter” with both both hops and guard like ball-handling skills. In one national invitational tournament, he put over 20 points or more on the scoreboard in quite a few games, and he rebounded and blocked shots very well.

Covenant Prep is a prep school. Prep school are usually much better than HS teams. Prep teams play high level bb. At the National Prep Invitational made up of the nation’s best teams Jourdain performed extremely well. He scored over 20 points in a number of games, and rebounded from 10-18 rebounds in a number of games. Also made good number of assists, blocks and steals.

Looks like a very good player. Plays smart as he doesn’t turn the ball over. Just hope he doesn’t foul excessively.

Should be able to challenge both Forrester and Moorman for playing time from the get-go. Wouldn't be surprised if he’s better than both on both sides of the ball.
(This post was last modified: 03-22-2020 12:18 PM by Miggy.)
03-18-2020 08:43 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #407
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
I have gone back and edited all previous 21 pages of my messages to hopefully bring more clarity, and I’ve had a chance to think about Temple’s season, especially those that dealt with Temple’s last five conference losses. I’be edited Temple’s last five conference losses to reflect my somewhat different view of those games.

I do have views on some Temple’s conference opponents that I’ll share here, and try to keep you posted on future transfer out and in, and future
freshmen recruits.
(This post was last modified: 03-21-2020 12:47 PM by Miggy.)
03-21-2020 12:44 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #408
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Hope there’s going to be college bb next season.Some experts predict that the virus cycles might not be over till 15-18 months from now. We just don’t know when social distance won’t be have to maintained. Will remain hopeful.
03-21-2020 02:41 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #409
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Temple’s record in conference play was 6-12. Of Temple’s 12 losses, 7 of those games were conference games were by less than 8- points. As Temple loss to conference champion Cincinnati by 1-point, Wichita State by 3-points, Houston, SMU, and ECU by 4-points, USF 6-by points, and Cincinnati by 7-points.

Two other Temple losses to both Memphis and Cincinnati were the result of Temple being beaten at the foul-line.

It’s my view that Temple would have won those games if Temple had played it’s pressure defense more, Rose and and Nate had not distributed the ball, and both had not taken so many shots. And better shooters like Perry, Scott, and other players had both played and shot more. Also, if Hamilton had played more as statistically he was Temple’s best rim protector..

For the same reasons, Temple could have won at least 3 of their 5 other losses that were by more than eight points, especially since Temple had beaten two of those teams, both UConn, and Tulane this season.

The only team that beat Temple in two games by large margins was Tulsa which had Temple’s number.

What could have been. Can only hope that HC McKie doesn’t nake the same mistakes next season.
(This post was last modified: 03-22-2020 08:24 AM by Miggy.)
03-22-2020 08:16 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #410
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Saw game video of Nick Jourdain. Did not look very good. Just hope his great stats from Prep Invitational are indication that he later improved his game considerable. But right now, not pleased of Temple’s front court is Forrester, Jourdain, Moorman, and Parks. Temple needs to use Hamilton’s open spot to sign a good transfer big.

Do like that Strickland is a good three-point shooter, and seems to have some nifty moves to score at the hoop, but do believe he turns the ball over too much, and if not corrected, his lack of good decision-making may well result in his being a back-up PG. JPL is even worse and he also fouls too much. Freshman recruit J. White played PG in HS, but is at best, a back-up PG.

Might be that McKie has to look elsewhere on his roster for a PG if he doesn’t find a good one. I suggested Monte Scott, a year ago, and i’m sticking with that.
(This post was last modified: 03-23-2020 02:30 PM by Miggy.)
03-23-2020 02:03 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #411
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Want to take some time to discuss Nate-Pierre Louise who, at times, has shown that he’s a great player, less so, at other times.

Nate is the hardest worker that any player on Temple’s team. He did not perform this season as well as last season. I attribute that to both Temple’s offensive and defensive system, and certain inherent problems with his own game.

In conference play last season, Nate averaged 14.3 points per game compared to only
10.1 ppg in conference games this season.

Such was mostly do to Nate’s 2 point-shooting percentage declining from 50.4 percent last season in conference play to 40.1 percent in conference play this season. Nate also made 1.1less foul shots per conference game. Nate’s decline in scoring contributed to Temple only scoring 67 ppg in conference games, and Temple losing 12 games in conference play.

Last season, Nate scoring 14. 3 ppg and shooting 50.4 percent was excellent for a starting guard. This season, Nate playing 34 mpg in conference play, and averaging but 10.1 ppg in on 40.1 percent two-point shooting was not. His low point production didn’t warrant him playing so many minutes, as even his excellent 8.1 rebounds per game did not offset his poor scoring.

Moreover, Temple had two excellent 2-point shooters in both Perry (59 percent on two’s), and Scott (54.7 percent) on two’s, who would have each increased Temple’s point totals if they played some of Nate’s minutes.

Nate shot 2-point jump shots at 25 percent or so the same as last season. That drilove his two point shooting percentages down in both years.

However, his biggest decline was scoring at the rim this season. As we find that’s Nate shot two’s at the rim at 62 percent last season, but only 52 percent this past season. I believe that Nate’s decline was do to his making poor decision in half court sets as to when to drive to the hoop, and Forrester being played in the low-post that cluttered the inside, and made it difficult for Nate to get to the hoop. Temple’s offensive play sets also may not as good as last year.

Also, Temple stopped playing it’s pressure defense as the season wore on also added to Nate’s decline getting to the rim.

As early in the season, Temple played a pressure defense that had Nate making steals, and scoring easily on lay-ups. As in Temple’s first two games, Nate made a whopping 5 and 6 steals that led to easy hoops. That was 20 percent of his steals for the season. As a result, Nate shot 55.6 percent (5-9) on two’s in Temple’s first game, and 63.6 percent (7-11) on two’s in Temple’s second game.

If McKie kept Temple’s pressure defense in ensuing and conference games, Nate would have shot much a much higher percentage on two’s then he ultimately did. As a result Nate 2-point shooting sharply declined.

Nate’s three point shooting also declined in conference play from 34 percent to 31 percent conference play.

Hopefully, Temple will play it’s pressure defense more when Nate plays next season.

Do think Temple will once again play mostly small ball. Would be even more effective next year with four guards on the court. Temple will need three good three-point shooters to win. Nate could be the fourth guard.

If Nate does not shoot much better than this past season, the shouldn’t play as much.
03-24-2020 01:04 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #412
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
I was reading a post on another site predicting that JPL, Nate’s brother is going to be very good player.

It’s hard for me to predict if he will be. He’s shown plenty of athleticism, as he’s fast in the open court, and is terrific doing twists and turns to get by his man, and lay the ball in the hoop. His dunks are breath-taking, and will bring you out of your seats. Like Nate, his motor is non-stop. His fearless in your face style of defense is played by very few college players, and is a treat to watch.

On the other hand, watching him stoke the ball doesn’t engender confidence, but pleasantly surprised that his 3-point shooting percentage was very good, even though sometimes the ball misses it’s mark by a good distance. We come away feeling that he won’t hurt Temple, and may in fact, help with his shooting as long as doesn’t take a lot of shots.

He averaged playing 12.9 minutes and 3.2 ppg in conference play, but took only 3.1 shots per game, dividing that between taking 2’s and 3’s. He shot his two’s at a decent 50 percent which would have been even higher except for his missed dunks. He shot three’s at 41.7 percent which is very good, but that must be tempered by the fact he only took 1.4 three’s per game.

He scored at the rim 58 percent of the time compared to Nate’s 52 percent scoring at the rim. Josh only took 8 two point jumpers and missed all of them.

Josh does some things, unless he changes his ways, that are both alarming and costly. As even after being told by coaches to make the easy hoop, instead he insists in dunking the ball, and it sometimes goes awry. He continued do that even at decisive moments in a game.

His real problem is not his basketball physical skills, but his basketball mental skills or basketball IQ, that will ultimately define him as a player.

One thing Josh should not continue to do is when guarding his opponent in the open court, is to be called for a foul by touching his body with his hand. Knows not to do that, but can’t help himself from repeatedly doing that. Is that do this being a freshman or is he such a reactive player he can’t help himself?

His fouling rate was very high at 1 foul every 9 minutes.

On offense, he’ll have passes intercepted when it’s obvious if he had looked he would have seen that the ball would be intercepted if he made the pass. Is that do to his inexperience or something else? All I know is that such happens too frequently.


It also bothered me that he was often looking to pass the ball to his brother, rather than to a better shooter who was both open and close-by.

His turnover rate was also high at 1 turnover every year 12.9 minutes.

Even though he shot well, his high turnover rate and his not helping others score resulted in his having a poor offensive rating. His failure to make steals and excessive fouling resulted in his also having a poor defensive rating.

Both his excessive fouling and turnovers negated his shooting.

I was surprised to see how rarely he stole the ball. Seems he should possess that skill like his brother does, but it hasn’t emerged as yet. For him to succeed he needs to develop that skill.

He has a tendency to be a hot-head and if there was a skirmish on the court, he’d want to get in it, and would not want to withdraw. I witnessed that in a HS game he played in. .

I don’t fon’t foresee him being be a good PG.

But, I can’t predict whether JPL will be a good player or not. Just know he has terrific athletic skills, but will be interesting to watch if he’s capable of developing the necessary basketball IQ that will allow him to succeed.
(This post was last modified: 03-25-2020 08:31 AM by Miggy.)
03-25-2020 08:17 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #413
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
I look at this past Temple season as one big colossal failure that did not have to go down hill as it did. As in Tempe scrimmages going back to last season, Scott, Perry, and Alani, were more productive offensively than Rose, Nate, and Moorman.

It’s my opinion that Temple would have scored 75 points plus in conference play this past season, if Scott and Perry had averaged 35 mpg, rather than Scott averaging just 20 mpg and Perry just 18 mpg, as they did. I believe that as Scott shot 54.7 percent on two’s, and Perry shot 59 percent on two’s and 34 percent on three’s. If they had taken Temple’s most shots, along with Alani, it’s likely that Temple would have scored way more points than Temple did with Rose and Nate taking Temple’s most shots.

Under my suggested plan, Rose and Nate would not have pavedaged 34 mpg as they did, but rather, Nate would have played 10 minutes less per game, and Rose 5 minutes less than he did. Both would have been told to shoot less, so their each shooting just 40 percent on two’s, and 31 percent on three’s as they did, would not have not hurt Temple as much as it did.

Moorman would have also played just 15 mpg, not the 27 mpg as he did.

I would have also played Hamilton more as statistically he was Temple’s best interior defender. D.Moore too.

Do believe that Temple would have far less turnovers if Rose and Nate played less.

I just regret that HC stayed stuck in the mud with his favored players, and watched Temple lose, rather than try new combination of players. We only saw glimpses of what could have been in Temple’s wins over SMU, Temple, and UConn.

I just fear the HC hasn’t learned from mistakes made this past season, and fear similar mistakes will be made this up-coming season.
(This post was last modified: 03-25-2020 10:37 PM by Miggy.)
03-25-2020 10:33 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #414
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
After watching bb games for sometime, I’ve come to learn how excessive turnovers and fouls adversely effect an outcome of a game, and that teams that commit few turnovers and fouls, place themselves in a better position to win games.

Both turnover and foul stats are significant as they ultimately take points off the board for one team, and provide opponents with more points.

Not good that in Temple’s conference games this season, that Temple committing more turnovers and fouls than opponents than in conference games this season, while the reverse was true last season.

When I first look at a team’s stats, I want to see how a team’s stats on turnovers and fouls compares to it’s opponents in these areas. For me, that’s a reflection on the team’s coaching staff and their ability to teach players how to not commit turnovers and fouls. I then look to individual players to see how they perform in these areas, and then compare them to other players on their team.

The gold standard for committing few turnover and fouls is the Univ. of Virginia. It’s useful compare Temple stats on turnovers and fouls to Virginia to see how far Temple lags behind in these categories.

In conference games, Virginia committed 12.45 turnovers conference games, compare to Temple’s 13.6 turnovers per conference game.

Even though Temple’s committed a little more than one more turnover per game, that translated into approximately two more points per game opponents score off that one turnover and Temple is losing one scoring opportunity and opponents are securing on scoring opportunity the otherwise should not have had.

Temple is losing Rose, who committed 2.8 turnovers per game, Temple’s most turnovers per game. If Scott and Perry replace Rose minutes, Temple’s turnovers should decline. However, Temple also loses Alani Moore, who’s turnovers were very low.

If Strickland or JPL replaces Alani Moore, Temple’s turnover rate will increase as both are high turnover players. Forrester is also a high turnover player. Just hope Temlle can find someone who can take his minutes.

In conference games Virginia committed 13.6 fouls per game compared to Temple’s 18. 7 fouls per game.One can see that Temple is committing a whopping 5 more fouls per game than Virginia commits. Virginia’s opponents averaged only 12.5 foul shots per conference game. Temple’s opponents averaged 19.3 fouls conference game.

So Temple opponents in conference games are taking almost 7 more foul shots that Virginia’s opponents are and scoring approximately 5 more points at the foul line that Virginia opponents are scoring at the foul-line.

While Temple opponents committed fewer turnovers and fouls than Temple did, but not as few as Virginia did, it’s still remains difficult for Temple to win when it excessively fouls and commits turnovers, and is at the same time shooting much lower on two’s than conference opponents. It’s why Temple has to put on the court players who both shoot well and commit few turnovers or fouls.

Seems clear that Temple’s excessive fouling is putting opponents at the line for more one and one’s and are fouling shooters more than Virginia is. excessive fouling is creating.

Temple is losing D.Moore and Hamilton who both played few minutes but fouled excessively.

Returning are Parks, Forrester and JPL who all commit both too many turnovers and fouls. excessively. Unless they dramatically lower their turnovers and fouls, Temple needs players to replace their playing time or for the HC to severely limit the minutes they play.

It shows how important it’s so important for Temple recruit to recruit smarter players with higher bb I’Q’s, and how to teach players to commit fewer turnovers and fouls. Both high turnovers and excessive fouls are more attributable to not playing smartly than physical limitations. Temple was not wise in signing Parks, Forrester, and JPL.

In my next post, i’ll provide my take on how Temple can teach players to commit fewer fouls and turnovers.
(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 02:22 PM by Miggy.)
03-26-2020 01:35 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #415
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
While Temple committed 5 more fouls per game than Virginia did in conference games, Temple’s conference opponents committed 2 less turnovers per game than Temple did. Even though Temple committed two more fouls per game than it’s opponents Temple still managed to take two more foul shots than opponents over the entire 18 conference games. .

As Temple strives to have a winning conference record next season, Temple would be wise to reduce their fouling so they foul much less than their opponents do.

Temple is losing Q.Rose who averaged 6.7 foul shots per game in conference play. Alani Moore is also departing, but he rarely went to the foul line. It’s doubtful that Temple will have players next season in the rotation who will force conference opponents to foul more than they did this past season.

Temple will need players who can be taught to reduce their fouling, or replace them with players who will foul less this up-coming season.
(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 08:17 PM by Miggy.)
03-26-2020 08:00 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #416
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
In watching a player play, we draw conclusions as to whether we think a player is good or not. Most times, we’re influenced first by whether a player is a good shooter.

The purpose of this post is to hopefully get fans to take a wider view of a player and to consider both the value of player’s shooting and non-shooting stats, and the relation of the different statistical categories to each other.

We’ll first consider a player’s shooting stats and then consider his non-shooting stats that ultimately lead us to forming an opinion of a player. If he’s a first year player and we feel we like him, but also see some things we don’t like, we’ll say he has potential and should be even better going forward as he has a chance to improve his game.

Two Temple players who fall in that category are transfer Jake Forrester and freshman Josh-Pierre Louise. Posters have a wide divergent of views as most like both players, even though there are aspects of their games, that fans want to see improve.

Let’s look at Jake Forrester first. I’ll post about JPL in my next post.

The first positive that can say about Forrester is that he hustles and shot fairly well from the field. As Forrester averaged 16.1 mpg in conference play, averaged 6.6 ppg, took 5.2 shots per game, and converted 2’s at a decent 51.1 percent rate. He did not shoot any three’s.

He averaged taking 2.8 foul shots per game, but shot only 48.9 percent from the foul-line. In watching him we get the feeling that he shoots a good bit, and he does as he shoots approximately once every 3 minutes or so factoring in his number of foul shots. So offensively our first impression is that he’s a an ok shooter, but we’d like to see him improve his foul shooting.

While we usually don’t think about his offensive rebounding while watching him, he does average 1.3 offensive rebound per game, which is good given the amount of time he plays.

Our attention is not drawn to his assist, steals, and blocks as he makes few of those. And since he only averages 1.7 defensive rebounds per game, our attention is not drawn to his defensive rebounds.

Whether you realize it or not in watching him play, he does both turn the ball over a lot, and fouls excessively. So in forming an opinion of a player that should be considered.

Forrester averaged 1.6 turnovers per game, and commuted 2.6 fouls per game.

Those numbers detract from his scoring. But how many points does his negative turnover and fouls numbers result in opponents points?

General speaking we can say that each turnover a player makes results in approximately 2.5 points. I say that because each turnover represents one less scoring opportunity for Temple and one more scoring opportunity for the opponent, and assuming each would convert 50 percent of each shot, that would be a little higher than two points as each team would have shot some three’s.

So m, I would estimate 2.5 point swing to the opposition off of one his turnover. That clearly how costly any turnover is by a player, and why when you look at a player’s box score you should look at a players turnovers. You should sakso look to see if the team won the overall turnover battle regardless of one player’s performance.,

So, given that Forrester committed 1.6 turnovers, generally speaking that means that the opponent scored an 3.8 points off his turnovers. That’s a devastating number of points.

We also saw that he committed 2.6 fouls per game. How many points did an opponent likely score off those fouls? There’s probably some stat article that indicate their worth, but I haven’t read them.

To get some rough idea, I decided to compare a team’s total number fouls over conference play to number of fouls shot by opponents. It comes to about one foul for each foul committed by the opponent.

And given that opponents average 70 percent or so on foul shots, I decided to give each foul committed by a player a value of .7 points.

So given that Forrester averages 2.6 fouls per conference games, that converts into 1.8 opponent points per game off his fouls. But, it’s probably even be more as I haven’t calculated in the number of shooting fouls he commits, nor the cumulative effect his high fouling rate on the number of one and one’s (penalty) the player he fouls takes or number of foul shots opponent players take.

So, off of Forrester’s combined turnovers and fouls, opponents score since 5.6 points per game, while he scores 6.6 points per game.

But that’s just the beginning of the calculation, as Forrester does make 1.3 offensive rebound and that is one extra possession and scoring opportunity that Temple would have otherwise not have had. But for a variety of reasons offensive rebounds are worth far less than turnovers, so while a portion his 1.6 turnovers are offset by his 1.3 offensive rebounds, opponents still score more points off his turnovers than Temple does off his offensive rebounds.

Also, while his steals should also offset his turnovers he makes few steals per game (.4). He should try to look for more steals given his quickness. Temple coaches need to show him to.

For some players like Rose who make a good number of steals, theirv steals need to be subtracted from their turnovers, in determining his turnovers point value.

So, it’s clear that Forrester has to learn to foul and commit less turnovers. Not sure how if he can reduce some of his turnovers as I often see him flubbing the ball away. He also fouls backing his man down that results in both a foul and turnover being called on the same play. He obviously was not taught how not to do that. Nor was he taught how now to make body contact when opponent has ball so he won’t be called for a foul.

His defensive stats show that opponents score quite well when he’s on the court (105.1 points per 100 possessions) One can see that in his excessive turnovers and fouls.

And his turnovers and fouls on offense coupled with his poor foul shooting also hurts his offensive rating as well as Temple sores less points and opponents more points by a wide margin when he plays. 93.1 points per 100 possessions per game).

He needs to drastically improve. Temple can’t afford another overall poor performance in which Forrester fouls once every 6.2 minutes, and turns the over once ever 12.3 minutes.
(This post was last modified: 03-27-2020 09:33 AM by Miggy.)
03-27-2020 09:18 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #417
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
JPL’s shooting stats are very good. As in conference he shot 50 percent on two’s and 41.7 percent on three’s he shot only 28.6 percent at the foul line. I wouldn’t draw the conclusion that he’s a good shooter given how awful he is shooting from the foul-line. It’s more that he shoots well from certain spots when left wide open as he shot good from those spots through repetition in practice. Not so from the foul-line.

Since his two point shots are mostly drives to the hoop, if he doesn’t vastly improve his shooting from the foul-line, opponents are going to foul him every time when he drives to the hoop so he is forced to shoot at the foul-line.

He averaged 12. 9 minutes per conference game, averaging 3.2 points per game, on 2.7 fga’s, and .7 foul shots per game.

His shooting so well from the field in undermined by his taking but 2.7 fga’s attempts per game. Also his rebounding, assists, and steals, are miniscule.

His bad stats are turnovers (1 per game game). He turns the ball over a whopping 21 percent of his touches. When I subtract his offensive rebounds (.2) and his steals (.4), from his turnovers, he averaged a net .4 turnovers per game with opponents scoring approximately 1 point per game off his net turnovers.

His 1.4 fouls per game resulted in opponents scoring 1-point per game off his fouls. So overall he cost Temple 2 points off of his net turnovers.

Conceptually, JPL’s scoring just 3.2 points per game on good shooting percentages doesn’t look so good when we consider the 2 points per game scored by opponents off his net turnovers and fouls.

But individual stats don’t tell the whole story, for even though his shooting percentages are very good, Temple as a team scored only 91.1 points per 100 possessions ( 2nd lowest scoring than any other Temple player) when he was on the court, 2 some less points than when Forrester played.

This tells me that the Temple players he played with did not score well when he was on the court. That’s partially do to his passing the ball mostly to his brother who doesn’t shoot very well or to other players who don’t shoot well. His turnovers don’t help. Don’t know how many offensive fouls he commits, and how that effects Temple’slack of scoring when Josh plays.

Temple also gives up a lot of points when Josh plays. As opponents score 105.1 point per 100 possessions when he!s on the court almost one more point than when Forrester plays.

It’s obvious to me that Josh has not been taught how to not foul, nor told to make only short perimeter passes so he does’t turn the ball over, nor told not to favor passing the ball to his brother. Do think his bad habits may we’ll be too baked-in, and his bb IQ too low to ever improve But do hope at a minimum, he improves his foul-shooting. that much.
(This post was last modified: 03-27-2020 06:08 PM by Miggy.)
03-27-2020 11:53 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #418
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Really don’t want to see Temple repeating by commit two more fouls than opponents did per conference game this season. Want to see Temple commit two less per game than opponents do. But don’t see Temple’s fouling going down next season.

Nor do I see Temple getting to the foul line more with Temple losing Rose ‘s 6.7 foul shots per game. If Scott plays more he should fill some of that void. Hopefully, Quincy A. and D.Dunn will get to the foul-line as well.

If Temple is to have any success Temple will have to replace Rose, not by having any player take as many many foul shots as he did, but rather having other players take over his 10.5 2-point fga’s per game, as both Perry and Scott should be able to convert them at a way higher rate than the 38.9 percent Rose shot. As if both Perry and Scott play way more minutes andcPerry shoots the 59 percent on two’s and Scott 54 percent on two’s as both did in conference play, For if Perry shoots 10 two’s and makes 6 of them for 12 points, rather than Rose taking 10- 2’s and making at best 4-2’s for eight points Scott shoot score points on two’s as well.

Fully expect Quincy A. and D.Dunn to shoot well on two’s as well. If Nate can’t improve his schooling on two’s and three’s, he should shoot much less than he has as Nate shot but 40.1 percent on two’s, and 31 percent on three’s.

Losing Alani scoring on his taking 4.7 three’s per game plus his few fouls and turnover could be a big hit. be a big hit. But Perry can make that up as he took only 2.5 three’s in conference play last season, and if he both plays and shoots more often he can come close making up Alani’s 4.7 three’s per game.

Temple should also shoot better shooting three’s next season with Quincy A, Strickland, Dunn, and if Scott returns to shooting his three point percentage as he shot at KSU.

Temple can commit fewer fouls if Parks, Forrester, and JPL being taught how to play aggressively without fouling or simply having their playing time sharply reduced until that sinks in. They also commit Temple’s most turnovers relative to their playing time.

Temple is losing both Rose and Alani, who based on their playing time, commit Temple’s fewest fouls in conference play. While Rose’s turnover rate was high, he offset that by garnering more steals and offensive rebounds. Same for Alani who had very few turnovers.

Strickland and JPL, are high turnover player. Unless Temple signs another PG, Temple should look elsewhere on the roster to play PG. I think Scott should be Temple’s PG because he has a high bb IQ, and a relatively low turnover rate, which he can easily improve
Upon.
03-27-2020 02:09 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #419
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
It’s beyond me why Dre Perry only averaged 18 mpg, shooting 56 percent on two’s, 41 percent on three’s, and shoots 85 percent from the foul-line for the season. Nor can I understand why he did not start, and why he took but 4.6 FGA’s per game. He should have been starting as he was by far Temple’s best player and shooter.

If he had started and played 33 minutes plus per game, Temple would have averaged way more than the 67-points they averaged in conference play.

Will that change this up-coming season? Will he start in place of Moorman or take Rose’s place in the starting line-up? If Mckie would only tell Perry to shoot the ball McKie will a 20-point plus per game shooter. Stay tuned.
03-27-2020 09:48 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 903
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #420
RE: Temple men’s bb 2019-2020
Listened to recent Owlscoop podcast that included a interview of HC McKie.

HC McKie said he was concerned last season with Temple’s inconsistent play. Did not seem to be aware or acknowledge that the reason Temple’s scoring dropped off from the year before was Nate’s scoring dropping sharply from 14.3 ppg to 10.1 ppg in conference play. That was do to his 2 and 3-point shooting percentages taking a nose-dive. As such, Nate should not have averaged 34.1 mpg as he did. Mckie he was going to look at videos to see what he could have done better.

Hope he realizes that Temple’s endemic offense needs to be bolstered with both Perry and Scott played more this season.

Temple will miss both Hamilton and D.Moore defensively inside, and Alani’s three-point shooting. Don’t think Temple will miss Rose, as he and Nate were a terrible combination on the backcourt. If Rose had played with both Perry and Scott more, and Nate and Moorman less, it’s my view would have faired much better than the did.

The Owlscoop podcasters each took their shot at this season’s starting line-up. In various line-ups, they had Strickland in the backcourt with Nate, and either Scott or Perry on the wing, Forrester at Center, and either Moorman, or Perry at PF. Some also suggested that Dunn and Quincy A. may at some point in the season be starters.

I’m concerned with which players will be Temple’s best starting line-up as I am with which 5-players will be Temple’s best combination of players on the court. I think that Temple best combination of players will be a small ball line-up, which was the case last season. Temple’s best small ball line-up would consist of Scott, Nate, Quincy A, Perry, and Moorman, with D.Dunn challenging Nate for playing time. It’s probable that we’ll never see who I prefer.

Still hope Temple signs another player who can have an impact this season.
(This post was last modified: 03-28-2020 07:41 AM by Miggy.)
03-28-2020 07:31 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2020 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2020 MyBB Group.