Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
baseball time
Author Message
ultramagnus Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 275
Joined: May 2004
Reputation: 4
I Root For: Utah State
Location:
Post: #11
 
How much money does it take to run a college baseball program? Since Utah St. has no baseball (other than a club team), I'm interested in knowing what it would take to get a program started. Anybody know a rich WAC/baseball fan that would care to donate enough money to start programs at Boise, Utah St., and Idaho? 04-deal Didn't think so, but it would be cool.
06-24-2004 09:00 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
NuMexAg Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 259
Joined: Apr 2004
Reputation: 8
I Root For: NMSU
Location: DFW
Post: #12
 
Baseball appears to be a relatively expensive sport. Nothing like football, but based on just annual operating expenses reported for 2002-03 baseball is close to the level of basketball in many schools. And of course you have to have a field, so if a school has to build one from scratch that would really add to the cost.

Then there's Title IX - have to add just as many women's scholies (11.7) - and in some cases more - to show progress toward bringing a school's ratio closer to compliance.

Here are the WAC operating expense figures for 02-03, plus a few others for comparison ($ in thousands) Of course, from an accounting perspective, these may not be so comparable - but gives us an idea...:

Rice 305 (more than basketball)
Fresno 225
La Tech 220
Hawaii 210
Nevada 173
SJSU 165
NMSU 131

Others:
Stanford 199
USo Calif 684 (more than basketball)
BYU 204
UNM 132
Texas 513
Texas A&M 370
Cal State Fullerton 141
06-24-2004 11:47 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ultramagnus Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 275
Joined: May 2004
Reputation: 4
I Root For: Utah State
Location:
Post: #13
 
So, around $200K is needed in the athletic budget to run a (WAC) NCAA baseball program? (Assuming no Title IX or facility issues). That really isn't too bad.

Apparently, baseball has become a cash cow for some universities, especially to those who make it to Omaha. The Big Ten is :crying: about there not being enough "access" or "opportunity" for them in the College World Series. Sound familiar? To that, all I can say to them is: What goes around comes around!


Big Ten baseball getting taste of BCS medicine
June 22, 2004
By Dennis Dodd


"We need some competitive equity in a sport that has none." Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany, June 22, Minneapolis Star Tribune

OMAHA, Neb. -- Smelling salts are available upon request after reading that quote. Or just pull yourself up off the floor after fainting. The shock will wear off eventually.

For the past six years, that statement could have been attributed to any president or athletic director from a disenfranchised non-BCS school. The Tulanes, the Marshalls, the BYUs etc. In the summer of 2004, it is uttered by a BCS power broker -- about baseball.

"Twenty percent of the country controls the national championship," Ohio State coach Bob Todd said this week. "It's not fair. It's time we make a stand."

Tell it to Nebraska or Creighton or Notre Dame. Those schools found the time, resources and money to get to Omaha. Maybe the fairest thing is that the haughty Big Ten now knows how Marshall, Tulane and BYU have felt trying to contend for a football national championship.

Here's a trade that would solve everything: Open up the Rose Bowl, the last stumbling block toward a college football playoff, and we'll give you your July CWS.


<a href='http://www.sportsline.com/collegebaseball/story/7441941?b1cp623' target='_blank'>Big Ten baseball getting a taste of BCS medicine</a>
06-24-2004 12:10 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Buddy1972 Offline
Water Engineer
*

Posts: 23
Joined: Feb 2004
Reputation: 0
I Root For:
Location:
Post: #14
 
Semi-interesting article from the LA Times regarding baseball revenue:

June 17, 2004

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

Event Isn't Exactly a Bonanza
As Cal State Fullerton can attest, financial rewards from baseball are modest when compared to other 'major' college sports.

By Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writer

Cal State Fullerton, like every other school in the California State University system, has budget problems. And just because the Titan baseball team will make its 13th appearance in the College World Series on Saturday doesn't mean the Fullerton athletic program will be in any better shape.

Among "major" college sports, this is an undeniable truth when it comes to baseball:

It's not football or basketball.

In football, bowl championship series teams each earned about $14 million to be divided, in most cases, among the schools in their conference.

In basketball, multibillion-dollar television contracts have resulted in lucrative paydays for every member of the 65-team tournament field. Pacific, which won a game before being eliminated in the second round, earned $290,000 for the Big West Conference.

But the Big West won't get any kind of check from Fullerton earning a place among college baseball's final eight teams. The Titans won't, either — except to cover some of their expenses.

The reason: The financial rewards from baseball are modest — a profit of about $2 million in each of the last two years — and relatively recent.

Only since 1998, the first season the NCAA expanded its baseball playoffs to the current three-tier format — 16 four-team regionals, eight best-of-three super regionals, then an eight-team final — have the playoffs made money.

What profit there is, the NCAA says, is divided evenly among all Division I member schools. That check, by all accounts, isn't nearly big enough to help a financially strapped college athletic program.

"We just hope the sport continues to grow in popularity so that some day it will command a major television contract," Big West Commissioner Dennis Farrell said.

The television following does seem to be growing — ESPN said that last year's national championship game between Rice and Stanford was the most-watched college baseball game in the history of the network — but progress has come in baby steps.

Last year was the first time ESPN affiliates televised each of the super regionals as part of an 11-year, $100-million deal to broadcast 21 NCAA championships. In contrast, CBS and ESPN paid the NCAA $6.2 billion to broadcast the NCAA men's basketball tournament.

George Horton, Fullerton's baseball coach, said he would like to see baseball teams rewarded on their performance in a way similar to that of football and basketball teams — even if the bonuses are much smaller.

"It's unfortunate for us, being a state institution here under a budget crunch, that there isn't some positive revenue coming back from this environment," Horton said. "There are some people that are part of our staff and we cannot afford to take them."

Schools that generate money from big-time football and basketball programs, "their per diem is better and the university buys tickets for the players' families," Horton said. "Because we don't have the resources, we sometimes incur a deficit when we go to Omaha."

Funding isn't a problem for the other schools in the College World Series.

In football this year, Miami and Louisiana State were in BCS games and Georgia, Arkansas and Texas were in other major bowl games. South Carolina and Arizona didn't play in the postseason but still enjoyed the financial shares from conference rivals who did.

In basketball, Arizona, South Carolina and Texas were tournament teams.

Fullerton had a losing record and was bounced from the Big West tournament in the first round.

Farrell said revenue from the baseball tournament wasn't missed because it had never been expected. But the Big West commissioner, who is also chair of the Division I baseball issues committee, said that may change as the sport continues to grow nationally.

Whether schools might someday receive revenue based on their performance in the NCAA playoffs may depend on baseball gaining a larger foothold in northern cities, Farrell said.

"I don't think we've come anywhere close to peaking in terms of interest," he said. "We have to continue to grow interest in the Northeast and Midwest. There are huge population centers in those markets and in cities like New York, Chicago or Boston, we have to try to give those teams some opportunity to really compete for the national championship.

"That's where TV ratings have the greatest impact. With ratings comes revenue."
06-25-2004 09:54 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
NuMexAg Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 259
Joined: Apr 2004
Reputation: 8
I Root For: NMSU
Location: DFW
Post: #15
 
Interesting article. Good news and bad news in there. The good: interest in college baseball is increasing, and will likely increase the financial rewards for teams that make it to post season. The bad: North and Northeast schools are likely to be the one with the most increased interest (read Big 10 and Big East).

As the money increases, more BCS schools will start clamoring for a bigger share (as we've seen this week from the Big 10 commissioner), and spending more money on coaches and recruiting making it harder for the CS Fullerton's and Rice's of the world to compete. I imagine baseball will evolve somewhat like women's basketball.

It wasn't that long ago that women's BB was a sport that a smaller budget school could put some emphasis on and have great national success (La Tech, Old Dominion, SF Austin). Now with the monetary rewards increasing - the scale is shifting toward BCS schools. Top 20 WBB reads just like the top 20 men's BB (La Tech excepted - but they are no longer #3 or 4 - more like #16-17).

On the positvie side - it should take a while to evolve - so we can enjoy the non-BCSers for a several more years.
06-25-2004 11:29 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
broncobob Offline
1st String
*

Posts: 1,579
Joined: Dec 2003
Reputation: 7
I Root For: The Broncos
Location: Middleton, IDAHO

Crappies
Post: #16
 
NuMexAg Wrote:Interesting article. Good news and bad news in there. The good: interest in college baseball is increasing, and will likely increase the financial rewards for teams that make it to post season. The bad: North and Northeast schools are likely to be the one with the most increased interest (read Big 10 and Big East).

As the money increases, more BCS schools will start clamoring for a bigger share (as we've seen this week from the Big 10 commissioner), and spending more money on coaches and recruiting making it harder for the CS Fullerton's and Rice's of the world to compete. I imagine baseball will evolve somewhat like women's basketball.

It wasn't that long ago that women's BB was a sport that a smaller budget school could put some emphasis on and have great national success (La Tech, Old Dominion, SF Austin). Now with the monetary rewards increasing - the scale is shifting toward BCS schools. Top 20 WBB reads just like the top 20 men's BB (La Tech excepted - but they are no longer #3 or 4 - more like #16-17).

On the positvie side - it should take a while to evolve - so we can enjoy the non-BCSers for a several more years.
Good take! It is hard to find a niche anymore. A lot of the smaller schools have worked hard to bring College Baseball to a better national standing, but as soon as the money starts to increase the BCS schools want to step in and steal the rewards.
06-25-2004 12:30 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
RiceDoc Offline
Jersey Retired
Jersey Retired

Posts: 7,541
Joined: May 2004
Reputation: 127
I Root For: Rice
Location: Tomball

The Parliament AwardsFootball GeniusNew Orleans BowlCrappiesDonatorsThe Parliament Awards
Post: #17
 
I write only to note that the figure for Rice is inflated (and we hope it stays that way in future years!) because of the expense associated with travelling to Omaha for 10 days. The expense for 2003-4 should be less simply because the Rice season ended prematurely. Simply put, advancing in baseball can be expensive because you get to bear the expense but the NCAA gets the revenue! We'd still rather have that expense. :D 04-cheers
06-28-2004 04:15 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
BowsFanUNL Offline
Water Engineer
*

Posts: 24
Joined: May 2004
Reputation: 0
I Root For:
Location:
Post: #18
 
Hawaii's baseball program doesn't make money, despite drawing decent numbers. The non-conference slate was weak this year though (w/ the exception of Texas who crushed us 3 straight).

I'd recommend baseball to all schools, and i'm still a little mystified that baseball can be such a popular pro sport, but barely register on the radar at the college level.
06-29-2004 03:38 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
TreeCounter Offline
Water Engineer
*

Posts: 4
Joined: May 2004
Reputation: 0
I Root For:
Location:
Post: #19
 
I thought that the Lewis-Clark Valley was Idaho's "Banana Belt."

BTW, Lewiston is home to the NAIA World Series & host school (Lewis-Clark State College) has won about 13 championships.
06-30-2004 07:37 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2014 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2014 MyBB Group.