Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
Rethinking the university
Author Message
bullet Offline
Legend
*

Posts: 34,809
Joined: Apr 2012
Reputation: 991
I Root For: Texas, UK, UGA
Location:
Post: #1
Rethinking the university
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archiv...ng/597310/

17 good questions from Ben Sasse about the future of the university.

"...Here’s the problem: Higher education is in the middle of multiple, massive disruptions—and it isn’t clear that the leaders of the sector grasp the magnitude of the waves of change breaking on their ivy-covered gates.

As just one example, it is decreasingly clear what purpose a four-year degree should serve when technology is changing the nature of work. These tidal economic and cultural changes should be prompting serious soul-searching in every board and faculty meeting, but most universities are deliberating with the urgency of 1951 becoming 1952...."
09-05-2019 11:57 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply

JRsec Offline
Super Moderator
*

Posts: 21,070
Joined: Mar 2012
Reputation: 1767
I Root For: SEC
Location:
Post: #2
RE: Rethinking the university
(09-05-2019 11:57 AM)bullet Wrote:  https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archiv...ng/597310/

17 good questions from Ben Sasse about the future of the university.

"...Here’s the problem: Higher education is in the middle of multiple, massive disruptions—and it isn’t clear that the leaders of the sector grasp the magnitude of the waves of change breaking on their ivy-covered gates.

As just one example, it is decreasingly clear what purpose a four-year degree should serve when technology is changing the nature of work. These tidal economic and cultural changes should be prompting serious soul-searching in every board and faculty meeting, but most universities are deliberating with the urgency of 1951 becoming 1952...."

What nobody should forget is that it was well rounded minds that created the technology. Greeks invented the first computer (antikythera device). Logic led to the loom which was the spark that generated the IBM punch card. And it was reason that figured out orbits and all of it happened long before the computer. What good is technology without morality, logic, the ability to reason, and an orientation as to how it may all be applied across all spheres of disciplines and across the spectrum of life.

Without well rounded minds we will become slaves to technology.
(This post was last modified: 09-05-2019 03:26 PM by JRsec.)
09-05-2019 03:19 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply

Captain Bearcat Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 5,524
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 297
I Root For: UC
Location: IL & Cincinnati, USA
Post: #3
RE: Rethinking the university
(09-05-2019 03:19 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(09-05-2019 11:57 AM)bullet Wrote:  https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archiv...ng/597310/

17 good questions from Ben Sasse about the future of the university.

"...Here’s the problem: Higher education is in the middle of multiple, massive disruptions—and it isn’t clear that the leaders of the sector grasp the magnitude of the waves of change breaking on their ivy-covered gates.

As just one example, it is decreasingly clear what purpose a four-year degree should serve when technology is changing the nature of work. These tidal economic and cultural changes should be prompting serious soul-searching in every board and faculty meeting, but most universities are deliberating with the urgency of 1951 becoming 1952...."

What nobody should forget is that it was well rounded minds that created the technology. Greeks invented the first computer (antikythera device). Logic led to the loom which was the spark that generated the IBM punch card. And it was reason that figured out orbits and all of it happened long before the computer. What good is technology without morality, logic, the ability to reason, and an orientation as to how it may all be applied across all spheres of disciplines and across the spectrum of life.

Without well rounded minds we will become slaves to technology.

I completely agree.

But I think that modern liberal arts "education" at most schools does nothing to round anyone out.

I have a history minor from an elite private school, and a PhD in economics. But every bit of civics & morals that I learned after 8th grade was either self-taught or from either my high school comparative governments teacher or a priest. Or from visiting museums, battlefields, foreign countries, and old relatives. Not one bit of civics or morals was from my college liberal arts classes.

Maybe I'm the exception. I know several people with philosophy degrees from very conservative Christian schools who disagree with me.
(This post was last modified: 09-08-2019 10:10 PM by Captain Bearcat.)
09-08-2019 10:09 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
JRsec Offline
Super Moderator
*

Posts: 21,070
Joined: Mar 2012
Reputation: 1767
I Root For: SEC
Location:
Post: #4
RE: Rethinking the university
(09-08-2019 10:09 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(09-05-2019 03:19 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(09-05-2019 11:57 AM)bullet Wrote:  https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archiv...ng/597310/

17 good questions from Ben Sasse about the future of the university.

"...Here’s the problem: Higher education is in the middle of multiple, massive disruptions—and it isn’t clear that the leaders of the sector grasp the magnitude of the waves of change breaking on their ivy-covered gates.

As just one example, it is decreasingly clear what purpose a four-year degree should serve when technology is changing the nature of work. These tidal economic and cultural changes should be prompting serious soul-searching in every board and faculty meeting, but most universities are deliberating with the urgency of 1951 becoming 1952...."

What nobody should forget is that it was well rounded minds that created the technology. Greeks invented the first computer (antikythera device). Logic led to the loom which was the spark that generated the IBM punch card. And it was reason that figured out orbits and all of it happened long before the computer. What good is technology without morality, logic, the ability to reason, and an orientation as to how it may all be applied across all spheres of disciplines and across the spectrum of life.

Without well rounded minds we will become slaves to technology.

I completely agree.

But I think that modern liberal arts "education" at most schools does nothing to round anyone out.

I have a history minor from an elite private school, and a PhD in economics. But every bit of civics & morals that I learned after 8th grade was either self-taught or from either my high school comparative governments teacher or a priest. Or from visiting museums, battlefields, foreign countries, and old relatives. Not one bit of civics or morals was from my college liberal arts classes.

Maybe I'm the exception. I know several people with philosophy degrees from very conservative Christian schools who disagree with me.

No, you aren't the exception. And I totally agree with you in this regard. I've had a work life that spanned more than 40 years. In the modern multi national corporation there are corporate ethics, but their application and interpretation is a universe away from what is right and what is wrong, what is loyal and disloyal is a one way street with the employee on the wrong end, and the admission of a wrong is impossible for fear of liability. It resembles nothing of the more hard and fast morality and ethics I learned early in life, and I am glad to say from high school teachers and select college professors who saw their work as a calling and the young people before them as their responsibility. I was also blessed by what I learned from family and the Church. In the last 30 years of my work life all of that was going and then gone. And the impersonal world in which we live we are reduced to a number, or a linkedin page, and are treated antiseptically by those above us in the chain of command. Add to that the fact we are also now largely and impersonally connected through electronics instead of real face time and all of it has only served to marginalize integrity, ethics, and morality all the more. It is why accountability, responsibility, and true cooperative teamwork are also disappearing from the work place at too many companies.

So no you are not the exception. Your experience is the norm.
(This post was last modified: 09-08-2019 10:34 PM by JRsec.)
09-08-2019 10:30 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2019 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2019 MyBB Group.