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Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
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BatesUAB Offline
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Post: #21
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(03-27-2022 07:33 PM)HiddenDragon Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 03:12 PM)UAB Band Dad Wrote:  
(03-25-2022 11:53 AM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  
(03-24-2022 07:00 PM)HiddenDragon Wrote:  Geez, I just posted info and asked if anyone knew about it. And the fact that Birmingham's city population has been on the decline for over a decade is a cause for concern even if it doesn't matter to most of you.

Bham population has been in decline for about 6 decades according to Census data.

That's because as soon as Birmingham elected its first Black Mayor, half the city moved over the mountain. Compare Shelby County's population in 1978 to now.

But if you go back to 78 that only account for 44 yrs. The population started declining in the 60s.

Yeah, he's got it backwards. Half the city didn't leave because a black mayor was elected. A black mayor got elected because half the city (the white half) moved out.
03-28-2022 11:39 AM
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scottycolsonblazer Offline
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Post: #22
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(03-28-2022 11:39 AM)BatesUAB Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 07:33 PM)HiddenDragon Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 03:12 PM)UAB Band Dad Wrote:  
(03-25-2022 11:53 AM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  
(03-24-2022 07:00 PM)HiddenDragon Wrote:  Geez, I just posted info and asked if anyone knew about it. And the fact that Birmingham's city population has been on the decline for over a decade is a cause for concern even if it doesn't matter to most of you.

Bham population has been in decline for about 6 decades according to Census data.

That's because as soon as Birmingham elected its first Black Mayor, half the city moved over the mountain. Compare Shelby County's population in 1978 to now.


The Census numbers since 1880. 340,000 in 1960 the high and decline since then between 5.4/5.5 and 12.6/11.7

1880 3,086 —
1890 26,178 748.3%
1900 38,415 46.7%
1910 132,685 245.4%
1920 178,806 34.8%
1930 259,678 45.2%
1940 267,583 3.0%
1950 326,037 21.8%
1960 340,887 4.6%
1970 300,910 −11.7%
1980 284,413 −5.5%
1990 265,968 −6.5%
2000 242,840 −8.7%
2010 212,237 −12.6%
2020 200,733 −5.4%

But if you go back to 78 that only account for 44 yrs. The population started declining in the 60s.

Yeah, he's got it backwards. Half the city didn't leave because a black mayor was elected. A black mayor got elected because half the city (the white half) moved out.
03-29-2022 02:50 PM
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scottycolsonblazer Offline
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Post: #23
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(03-29-2022 02:50 PM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  
(03-28-2022 11:39 AM)BatesUAB Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 07:33 PM)HiddenDragon Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 03:12 PM)UAB Band Dad Wrote:  
(03-25-2022 11:53 AM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  Bham population has been in decline for about 6 decades according to Census data.

That's because as soon as Birmingham elected its first Black Mayor, half the city moved over the mountain. Compare Shelby County's population in 1978 to now.


The Census numbers since 1880. 340,000 in 1960 the high and decline since then between 5.4/5.5 and 12.6/11.7

1880 3,086 —
1890 26,178 748.3%
1900 38,415 46.7%
1910 132,685 245.4%
1920 178,806 34.8%
1930 259,678 45.2%
1940 267,583 3.0%
1950 326,037 21.8%
1960 340,887 4.6%
1970 300,910 −11.7%
1980 284,413 −5.5%
1990 265,968 −6.5%
2000 242,840 −8.7%
2010 212,237 −12.6%
2020 200,733 −5.4%

But if you go back to 78 that only account for 44 yrs. The population started declining in the 60s.

Yeah, he's got it backwards. Half the city didn't leave because a black mayor was elected. A black mayor got elected because half the city (the white half) moved out.

Also keep in mind that some of the big increases represented consolidations of cities like West End, Ensley, Woodlawn and such. In 1979 when Dr. Richard Arrington Jr. was elected as first African American mayor the city voting population was still slightly majority white.
03-29-2022 02:53 PM
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scottycolsonblazer Offline
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Post: #24
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(03-29-2022 02:53 PM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  
(03-29-2022 02:50 PM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  
(03-28-2022 11:39 AM)BatesUAB Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 07:33 PM)HiddenDragon Wrote:  
(03-27-2022 03:12 PM)UAB Band Dad Wrote:  That's because as soon as Birmingham elected its first Black Mayor, half the city moved over the mountain. Compare Shelby County's population in 1978 to now.


The Census numbers since 1880. 340,000 in 1960 the high and decline since then between 5.4/5.5 and 12.6/11.7

1880 3,086 —
1890 26,178 748.3%
1900 38,415 46.7%
1910 132,685 245.4%
1920 178,806 34.8%
1930 259,678 45.2%
1940 267,583 3.0%
1950 326,037 21.8%
1960 340,887 4.6%
1970 300,910 −11.7%
1980 284,413 −5.5%
1990 265,968 −6.5%
2000 242,840 −8.7%
2010 212,237 −12.6%
2020 200,733 −5.4%

But if you go back to 78 that only account for 44 yrs. The population started declining in the 60s.

Yeah, he's got it backwards. Half the city didn't leave because a black mayor was elected. A black mayor got elected because half the city (the white half) moved out.

Also keep in mind that some of the big increases represented consolidations of cities like West End, Ensley, Woodlawn and such. In 1979 when Dr. Richard Arrington Jr. was elected as first African American mayor the city voting population was still slightly majority white.

And this census data showing continued changes in demographics of Bham based on race.

2020 census
Birmingham racial composition[30]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 45,993 22.91%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 136,731 68.12%
Native American 346 0.17%
Asian 3,255 1.62%
Pacific Islander 109 0.05%
Other/Mixed 5,025 2.5%
Hispanic or Latino 9,274 4.62%
As of the 2020 United States census, there were 200,733 people, 93,300 households, and 46,816 families residing in the city.

2010
According to the 2010 U.S. Census:[13]

73.4% African American (Black)
22.3% Caucasian (White)
0.2% Native American
1.0% Asian
0.0% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
1.0% Two or more races
2.1% Other races
3.6% Hispanic or Latino (of any race)
03-29-2022 02:56 PM
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C-Finder Offline
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Post: #25
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
The Bar & Grille must have shut down like Sears 03-drunk
03-29-2022 03:14 PM
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Bosshawk Offline
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Post: #26
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
A lot to unpack here.

This story is about 6-8 months old at this point. While I am sure not everyone is aware, it is kind of old news and not really a hot button item anymore, in addition to it being predicted for several years. Also, Birmingham didn't lose population for a decade, it lost population for 6 decades, as all other rust belt style cities did.

As previously stated, the metro is all that matters in the USA, and while it is annoying that the city proper is no longer the largest, it is generally irrelevant.

But the actual story here is this: There is absolutely zero way that Birmingham's population numbers are accurate. Just the smell test alone doesn't pass. The city has added 10,000 apartment/condo units since 2010, and yet population falls?

Look at neighborhood level numbers: https://www.al.com/news/2021/08/black-po...-grew.html
There is absolutely, positively zero way that Glen Iris lost 22% of its population; most definitely not with no significant decrease in housing stock and a fairly large uptick in UAB students over that time, which is a sizeable chunk of Glen Iris. There is absolutely zero way that Woodlawn lost 40% of its population. This is an area that has seen an uptick in housing flips, new housing, and gentrification(not here to argue about gentrification, but it is a fact in Woodlawn).

Look at voter rolls. No, that is not 100% indicative of population, but it doesn't add up. In 2011, the city had 118,500 registered voters. In 2021, the city had 145,564 registered voters. So the number of registered voters increased by 27,000 but the population feel by 12,000? Seems pretty implausible. Not an absolute fact, but when taken in context with other data, it doesn't make sense. All data can be seen here: https://www.birminghamal.gov/city-directory/city-clerk/

School enrollment: Birmingham City Schools lost about 1,000 students between 2010 and 2020. But, the city now has a few charter schools. i3 Academy in Woodlawn alone has over 400 students. Sure not every single student at the charter schools are from the city of Birmingham, but the vast majority are.

Then there is this just recently: https://www.al.com/news/2022/03/minority...ensus.html
Minority groups(defined here as black, hispanic, native american, asian, renters) were undercounted in a way that dramatically impacted Birmingham(and didn't as negatively impact Huntsville). Birmingham has a relatively high percentage of Black population and renters, the 2 most undercounted groups. Per the census' own estimates from 2019, the actuals in 2020 were 10% below.

Why there was not a stronger appeal by the city of Birmingham regarding census numbers remains a mystery and is frankly a dereliction of duty. Would it have actually mattered? Hard to say. But there should have been an attempt.
03-31-2022 12:49 PM
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DuelingDragon Offline
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Post: #27
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
Good post. Now determine who benefits by the underplaying of Birmingham city population and you might get to some motive.
03-31-2022 01:00 PM
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HiddenDragon Offline
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Post: #28
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
Well of course the census numbers aren't accurate and probably not even close to being sorta accurate considering that many people don't even bother to participate in the census.
(This post was last modified: 04-01-2022 10:46 AM by HiddenDragon.)
03-31-2022 02:35 PM
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scottycolsonblazer Offline
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Post: #29
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(03-31-2022 12:49 PM)Bosshawk Wrote:  A lot to unpack here.

This story is about 6-8 months old at this point. While I am sure not everyone is aware, it is kind of old news and not really a hot button item anymore, in addition to it being predicted for several years. Also, Birmingham didn't lose population for a decade, it lost population for 6 decades, as all other rust belt style cities did.

As previously stated, the metro is all that matters in the USA, and while it is annoying that the city proper is no longer the largest, it is generally irrelevant.

But the actual story here is this: There is absolutely zero way that Birmingham's population numbers are accurate. Just the smell test alone doesn't pass. The city has added 10,000 apartment/condo units since 2010, and yet population falls?

Look at neighborhood level numbers: https://www.al.com/news/2021/08/black-po...-grew.html
There is absolutely, positively zero way that Glen Iris lost 22% of its population; most definitely not with no significant decrease in housing stock and a fairly large uptick in UAB students over that time, which is a sizeable chunk of Glen Iris. There is absolutely zero way that Woodlawn lost 40% of its population. This is an area that has seen an uptick in housing flips, new housing, and gentrification(not here to argue about gentrification, but it is a fact in Woodlawn).

Look at voter rolls. No, that is not 100% indicative of population, but it doesn't add up. In 2011, the city had 118,500 registered voters. In 2021, the city had 145,564 registered voters. So the number of registered voters increased by 27,000 but the population feel by 12,000? Seems pretty implausible. Not an absolute fact, but when taken in context with other data, it doesn't make sense. All data can be seen here: https://www.birminghamal.gov/city-directory/city-clerk/

School enrollment: Birmingham City Schools lost about 1,000 students between 2010 and 2020. But, the city now has a few charter schools. i3 Academy in Woodlawn alone has over 400 students. Sure not every single student at the charter schools are from the city of Birmingham, but the vast majority are.

Then there is this just recently: https://www.al.com/news/2022/03/minority...ensus.html
Minority groups(defined here as black, hispanic, native american, asian, renters) were undercounted in a way that dramatically impacted Birmingham(and didn't as negatively impact Huntsville). Birmingham has a relatively high percentage of Black population and renters, the 2 most undercounted groups. Per the census' own estimates from 2019, the actuals in 2020 were 10% below.

Why there was not a stronger appeal by the city of Birmingham regarding census numbers remains a mystery and is frankly a dereliction of duty. Would it have actually mattered? Hard to say. But there should have been an attempt.

Voter registration increase can be explained by the heavy registration efforts for the 2017 election by Woodfin...say what you will about their politics but they did a master class in grass roots organizing and also heavy efforts to register voters for 2020 elections. Also with COVID this may be the worst under count in history.
04-01-2022 10:02 AM
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Bosshawk Offline
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Post: #30
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(04-01-2022 10:02 AM)scottycolsonblazer Wrote:  
(03-31-2022 12:49 PM)Bosshawk Wrote:  A lot to unpack here.

This story is about 6-8 months old at this point. While I am sure not everyone is aware, it is kind of old news and not really a hot button item anymore, in addition to it being predicted for several years. Also, Birmingham didn't lose population for a decade, it lost population for 6 decades, as all other rust belt style cities did.

As previously stated, the metro is all that matters in the USA, and while it is annoying that the city proper is no longer the largest, it is generally irrelevant.

But the actual story here is this: There is absolutely zero way that Birmingham's population numbers are accurate. Just the smell test alone doesn't pass. The city has added 10,000 apartment/condo units since 2010, and yet population falls?

Look at neighborhood level numbers: https://www.al.com/news/2021/08/black-po...-grew.html
There is absolutely, positively zero way that Glen Iris lost 22% of its population; most definitely not with no significant decrease in housing stock and a fairly large uptick in UAB students over that time, which is a sizeable chunk of Glen Iris. There is absolutely zero way that Woodlawn lost 40% of its population. This is an area that has seen an uptick in housing flips, new housing, and gentrification(not here to argue about gentrification, but it is a fact in Woodlawn).

Look at voter rolls. No, that is not 100% indicative of population, but it doesn't add up. In 2011, the city had 118,500 registered voters. In 2021, the city had 145,564 registered voters. So the number of registered voters increased by 27,000 but the population feel by 12,000? Seems pretty implausible. Not an absolute fact, but when taken in context with other data, it doesn't make sense. All data can be seen here: https://www.birminghamal.gov/city-directory/city-clerk/

School enrollment: Birmingham City Schools lost about 1,000 students between 2010 and 2020. But, the city now has a few charter schools. i3 Academy in Woodlawn alone has over 400 students. Sure not every single student at the charter schools are from the city of Birmingham, but the vast majority are.

Then there is this just recently: https://www.al.com/news/2022/03/minority...ensus.html
Minority groups(defined here as black, hispanic, native american, asian, renters) were undercounted in a way that dramatically impacted Birmingham(and didn't as negatively impact Huntsville). Birmingham has a relatively high percentage of Black population and renters, the 2 most undercounted groups. Per the census' own estimates from 2019, the actuals in 2020 were 10% below.

Why there was not a stronger appeal by the city of Birmingham regarding census numbers remains a mystery and is frankly a dereliction of duty. Would it have actually mattered? Hard to say. But there should have been an attempt.

Voter registration increase can be explained by the heavy registration efforts for the 2017 election by Woodfin...say what you will about their politics but they did a master class in grass roots organizing and also heavy efforts to register voters for 2020 elections. Also with COVID this may be the worst under count in history.

To an extent the 2017 election was the cause. From 2013 to 2017 registered voters increased by 13k. So that is half the increase. But there was also a fairly substantial increase from 2011 to 2013.
04-01-2022 07:28 PM
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C-Finder Offline
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Post: #31
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
Make it the third largest city behind.... Montgomery 04-jawdrop
al.com article
06-11-2022 08:15 PM
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mobileblazer Offline
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Post: #32
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(06-11-2022 08:15 PM)C-Finder Wrote:  Make it the third largest city behind.... Montgomery 04-jawdrop
al.com article

Aaaaand the Bham metro area is still as populated as Huntsville, Montgomery & Mobile.
06-12-2022 07:42 AM
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HiddenDragon Offline
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Post: #33
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(06-12-2022 07:42 AM)mobileblazer Wrote:  
(06-11-2022 08:15 PM)C-Finder Wrote:  Make it the third largest city behind.... Montgomery 04-jawdrop
al.com article

Aaaaand the Bham metro area is still as populated as Huntsville, Montgomery & Mobile.

Did someone say it wasn't? Of course Birmingham still has the biggest metropolitan population in the state.
(This post was last modified: 06-12-2022 01:46 PM by HiddenDragon.)
06-12-2022 01:45 PM
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BlazerDave Offline
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Post: #34
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
It just doesn't matter.
06-12-2022 03:27 PM
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blazerjay Offline
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Post: #35
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
Apparently it does to some. They keep bringing this worthless **** up.
06-12-2022 06:22 PM
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HiddenDragon Offline
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Post: #36
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(06-12-2022 03:27 PM)BlazerDave Wrote:  It just doesn't matter.

We talk about a lot of stuff on this board that doesn't matter but we freely talk about the unimportant stuff anyways. If you're white you probably don't care about the declining population in Birmingham considering the city is 65% black.

Totally understandable that this is not important for a lot of you here.
(This post was last modified: 06-13-2022 07:04 AM by HiddenDragon.)
06-12-2022 08:38 PM
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WesternBlazer Offline
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Post: #37
RE: Birmingham is no longer the largest city in Alabama. Did ya know that?
(06-11-2022 08:15 PM)C-Finder Wrote:  Make it the third largest city behind.... Montgomery 04-jawdrop
al.com article

FWIW...Mobile is looking into annexation to increase population...
(This post was last modified: 06-12-2022 09:24 PM by WesternBlazer.)
06-12-2022 09:24 PM
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