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All Things Realignment 2.0
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BearcatMan Offline
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Post: #2961
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 02:02 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 01:42 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:00 AM)Cataclysmo Wrote:  
(09-23-2022 03:11 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  Guys, UC is accepting 85% of the applicants to campus right now. The university wants to boost the number of CPS students and increase its enrollment to 60,000k by 2030. We are hardly in any place to mock Louisville’s academics.

So? We're expanding the school as a stated objective. Our academics consist of far more than acceptance rate and total student population, anyways.

There are schools like UCF that sacrifice academics to get there, and then there are schools like OSU that build toward massive student/faculty sizes over time by capitalizing on resources. UC has the infrastructure in place to get to 60K and compete with OSU, so they should do it. Importantly, I think one of our goals during this expansion is to get there without sacrificing too much of admissions standards.


What part of UC's "infrastructure" do you think is capable of supporting 60,000 students?

Genuinely curious.

That's a 24% increase over 2022 enrollment. My impression is that UC lacks the classroom space, dorm space, and office space for a 24% increase in students.


The new business building was too small for the entire business school on the day it opened (mostly because they made the building 2 stories smaller than originally planned to cut costs).

I've been wondering about this since I first read the proposal from President Pinto. To get to 60K they are going to have to do one or more of the following:

1) On-line
2) Building a Satellite Campus somewhere
3) Merging/bringing another institution in-house
4) Buying up more space around campus (clearing it and building onto the campus).
All good options...

1) That's going to be their biggest growth opportunity...UC Global Campus would be making a killing with some degrees, unfortunately the most significant programs within UC are the least replicable in an online setting.
2) They've already got two of those and the State has been VERY hawkish when it comes to any of the non-OSU institutions building anymore, thank you Kent State...
3) I think the opportunity here is clearly the Hebrew Union College, as it is being significantly downsized to the point of near zero operations, has a beautiful, classical campus, and with the buildup around Clifton/MLK intersection, is contiguous with the Main Campus. Could very easily see that be an area for either residence or a new place to house some of the departments which will have to vacate Crosley in the coming years. Hell, that could be a whole campus provided to the Liberal Sciences, and McMicken could become the administrative building. Only problem is it is a half mile from the nearest residence hall, and requires students to cross two major thoroughfares. Would likely need permanent mass transit options dedicated to travelling to that area.
4) I don't think UC has a lot of opportunities left as nearly every square inch around campus has been gobbled up by various developers for the purposes of housing/multi-use space. That will obviously help with housing students, but it doesn't help with the lack of instructional spaces. I could very easily see some currently existing residence halls becoming Office and Instructional spaces in the near future as well (Dabney/French and Daniels come to mind).

This just brings things back to the point so many of us have said over the years...but, man, wouldn't it be nice to have Burnet Woods...
 
(This post was last modified: 09-27-2022 02:22 PM by BearcatMan.)
09-27-2022 02:15 PM
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BearcatJerry Online
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Post: #2962
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
One demographic that should be worrying pretty much everyone in Education and Higher Education is the precipitous drop in the number of students coming of age in the next generational cycle. We have been "expanding" capacity through building projects and availability through Student Loans and such, but there are nowhere near the number of students up-stream to fill those seats. Graduating classes from 2023 onwards are sharply lower and when you look down towards the Middle School/Jr. High and Elementary school numbers they are somewhere around HALF as big as those that have come before them. And if the trends with "Millennials" hold up, there will be even fewer children growing up to be college-aged young-adults.

Couple that with the growing trend towards vocational school for high school aged kids (leading maybe towards older-adult/non-traditional students seeking bachelor degrees later in life) and there may not be a NEED for UC...or OSU...to have 60,000 seats even available.

I think UC is about a decade late to this race and chasing a trend that will be gone just in time for their "mega" capacity to be realized.
 
09-27-2022 03:31 PM
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BearcatsUC Offline
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Post: #2963
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
15 years ago, UC was trying to be Top 100. Then it was about growing to 48,000. Now it’s 60,000.

I wish the school would pick a goal/direction and stick to it.

I know planning should be flexible, but as a two-time graduate, I wish I understood what the what the intention is. More students equals more professors and more research?

Demographics haven’t been good for a while, yet UC continues to grow. A lot of small privates still to be driven out of business, and there are other unattractive state schools to poach.
 
(This post was last modified: 09-27-2022 03:43 PM by BearcatsUC.)
09-27-2022 03:38 PM
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CliftonAve Online
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RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 03:31 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  One demographic that should be worrying pretty much everyone in Education and Higher Education is the precipitous drop in the number of students coming of age in the next generational cycle. We have been "expanding" capacity through building projects and availability through Student Loans and such, but there are nowhere near the number of students up-stream to fill those seats. Graduating classes from 2023 onwards are sharply lower and when you look down towards the Middle School/Jr. High and Elementary school numbers they are somewhere around HALF as big as those that have come before them. And if the trends with "Millennials" hold up, there will be even fewer children growing up to be college-aged young-adults.

Couple that with the growing trend towards vocational school for high school aged kids (leading maybe towards older-adult/non-traditional students seeking bachelor degrees later in life) and there may not be a NEED for UC...or OSU...to have 60,000 seats even available.

I think UC is about a decade late to this race and chasing a trend that will be gone just in time for their "mega" capacity to be realized.

I'm not sure if I put this earlier in this thread or in another, but I could see UC pulling Cincinnati State in-house. Would solve the space issue, add the type of programs you are talking about and address the Next Lives Here campaign to add substantially more CPS students into the study body.

FWIW Cincinnati State has roughly 10K students which would get them near that 60K mark.
 
09-27-2022 03:43 PM
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Cataclysmo Offline
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Post: #2965
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 01:42 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  What part of UC's "infrastructure" do you think is capable of supporting 60,000 students?

Genuinely curious.

That's a 24% increase over 2022 enrollment. My impression is that UC lacks the classroom space, dorm space, and office space for a 24% increase in students.


The new business building was too small for the entire business school on the day it opened (mostly because they made the building 2 stories smaller than originally planned to cut costs).

The physical infrastructure has a long way to go but I don't think classroom space, dorm availability, or office space should be the limiting factor for a major university - and that's an opinion that I think is reinforced by the expansion of our campus space over the last 10 to 20 years. When I started undergrad in 2014 the following buildings either did not exist, or did not exist in their current iteration:

Just completed: Morgens, Scioto Glass Renovation

Since completed:

-Nippert
-Dabney Hall
-Morgan's Hall
-Teacher's College
-College of Business
-1819 Innovation Hub
-Gardner Neuroscience Institute
-The uptown consortium off 71
-Health sciences building

Soon to be completed:

- Calhoun Hall renovation
- Old business renovation into new Law School

Approved projects/Likely Projects:

-YMCA Renovation
-Whatever is going in those sheds by DAAP (Engineering building?)


And that's not to mention to the countless off campus housing options being built. All in all, I just don't think physical space is the primary concern for UC. I think the region from St. Bernard down to OTR has enough infrastructure to accommodate another 10,000 people or so, eventually. I mean, there's certainly no shortage of development occurring in the area.

More important is whether we can continue to recruit the talent that belongs at UC and keeps admission standards respectable (UC does have too high of an acceptance rate, I agree) while hiring faculty with potential to conduct valuable research. I was personally impressed with many of the new, younger Engineering professors that were brought on when I was in grad school. I know it's not the same for every college but I do feel that Cincinnati and UC are doing the right things to attract talent for a potential expansion.
 
(This post was last modified: 09-27-2022 04:48 PM by Cataclysmo.)
09-27-2022 04:04 PM
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Cataclysmo Offline
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Post: #2966
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 03:38 PM)BearcatsUC Wrote:  15 years ago, UC was trying to be Top 100. Then it was about growing to 48,000. Now it’s 60,000.

I wish the school would pick a goal/direction and stick to it.

I know planning should be flexible, but as a two-time graduate, I wish I understood what the what the intention is. More students equals more professors and more research?

Demographics haven’t been good for a while, yet UC continues to grow. A lot of small privates still to be driven out of business, and there are other unattractive state schools to poach.

More students = more tuition = direct revenue stream = ? = Better faculty

The trade off is that, generally, the more students you have, the more professors you need to accommodate them. Schools like UCF just have a ton of people around with no one to teach them. Schools like OSU have a ton of students AND a ton of faculty.

UC is somewhere in between, but I'd argue we have a little bit of breathing room to expand with students. For instance, if you look at the # of Professors vs. Enrollment sizes at Power 5 schools, we are above the average for student-to-faculty ratio, closer to some of the more prestigious institutions.

[Image: 7a8eWGa.jpeg]

I posted this previously, but we are somewhat close to matching the total R&D expenditure of many AAU schools, albeit with a smaller faculty pool.

[Image: hgXXqYX.jpeg]

Maybe the plan is to increase students by 10% or whatever and increase faculty by 5%, or something like that. Idk.
 
(This post was last modified: 09-27-2022 04:51 PM by Cataclysmo.)
09-27-2022 04:45 PM
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namrag Offline
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Post: #2967
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 09:16 AM)BearcatsUC Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:40 PM)Billy_Bearcat Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:21 PM)namrag Wrote:  Is co-op mostly an engineering thing?

Speaking specifically of Pharmacy, co-op is not possible at UC or anywhere else.

My wife is a DAAP grad and the co-op program is essential over there. Their placement office back then was phenomenal and her co-op experience was invaluable in landing her a top job right out of school.

This was a long time ago, but my sister worked her way through pharmacy school as a tech at Kroger and graduated without debt. Kroger payed for her tuition as long as she stayed with Kroger for a certain period of time after graduation. Thd pharmacy degree is different today, I believe, so I’m not sure how it works now.

She most likely started as a technician and then transitioned to an intern once she was admitted to pharmacy school.

Things changed around 2005. That is when all pharmacy programs went from a bachelors degree with the option to complete a PharmD after finishing the bachelors, to now all programs being PharmD only.

Prior to 2005 the State Board of Pharmacy required 1500 hours of intern experience before you could sit for the licensing board.

That was entirely independent of the university, and the college of pharmacy had nothing to do with intern hours beyond informally checking with their students to make sure they were completing their intern hours.
 
09-27-2022 10:06 PM
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namrag Offline
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Post: #2968
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 09:30 AM)bearcatmill Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:21 PM)namrag Wrote:  Is co-op mostly an engineering thing?

Speaking specifically of Pharmacy, co-op is not possible at UC or anywhere else.

My wife is a pharmacist. Most pharmacy schools, UC included, have a track where you can gain experience as a student. Also, residency programs if you plan on being a pharmacist in a hospital setting.

The pharmacy program does not allow for co-op experiences.

In 2005 all colleges of pharmacy did away with the bachelors degree and now only offer the PharmD.

Part of the PharmD curriculum at all colleges of pharmacy is programmed hours of experience in practice settings in each year of pharmacy school.

This replaced the previous model where students had to gain intern experience independent of their college curriculum, 1500 hours worth, before being able to sit for the licensing exam after graduation.

In the old model intern hours were gained in paid jobs as interns, mostly at retail pharmacies like Kroger.

In the new model the experience hours are part of the college curriculum, and are not paid. In fact students are paying tuition while they are completing these practice experience hours.

Initially the students complete IPPE’s, Introductory Professional Practice Experience, which are several hours a week during the semester while also carrying a class load.

In the last year of PharmD school students complete 10 APPE’s, Advanced Professional Practice Experience, which are month long full-time practice rotations in various settings. The month-long rotations are unpaid, and the student pays regular full time tuition for that final year.

For both the IPPE’s and APPE’s the colleges depend on practice settings taking their students to provide the practice experiences.

I loath that.

I spent the first 18 years of my time in the network I work in managing student experiences with the various Ohio colleges of pharmacy.

It is a racket.

The students pay the universities to work for free. And the universities expect various hospitals, retail pharmacies, etc to provide the experiences for next to nothing.

UC pays a practice site nothing for the IPPE students, and $500 for each APPE month.

Pharmacy Residency programs are no different than physician residencies. Most residencies are in the hospital setting, but there are residencies in retail, research, ambulatory care, psych, industry, etc, etc.

They are applied to after graduating, and are entirely independent of the colleges of pharmacy.

They are not mandatory. They are generally a way for high achievers to make themselves more competitive in the job market.

I started a PGY1 residency program at my network, and was the Director for the first 10 years of it.
 
09-27-2022 10:45 PM
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colohank Offline
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Post: #2969
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 02:15 PM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 02:02 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 01:42 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:00 AM)Cataclysmo Wrote:  
(09-23-2022 03:11 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  Guys, UC is accepting 85% of the applicants to campus right now. The university wants to boost the number of CPS students and increase its enrollment to 60,000k by 2030. We are hardly in any place to mock Louisville’s academics.

So? We're expanding the school as a stated objective. Our academics consist of far more than acceptance rate and total student population, anyways.

There are schools like UCF that sacrifice academics to get there, and then there are schools like OSU that build toward massive student/faculty sizes over time by capitalizing on resources. UC has the infrastructure in place to get to 60K and compete with OSU, so they should do it. Importantly, I think one of our goals during this expansion is to get there without sacrificing too much of admissions standards.


What part of UC's "infrastructure" do you think is capable of supporting 60,000 students?

Genuinely curious.

That's a 24% increase over 2022 enrollment. My impression is that UC lacks the classroom space, dorm space, and office space for a 24% increase in students.


The new business building was too small for the entire business school on the day it opened (mostly because they made the building 2 stories smaller than originally planned to cut costs).

I've been wondering about this since I first read the proposal from President Pinto. To get to 60K they are going to have to do one or more of the following:

1) On-line
2) Building a Satellite Campus somewhere
3) Merging/bringing another institution in-house
4) Buying up more space around campus (clearing it and building onto the campus).
All good options...

1) That's going to be their biggest growth opportunity...UC Global Campus would be making a killing with some degrees, unfortunately the most significant programs within UC are the least replicable in an online setting.
2) They've already got two of those and the State has been VERY hawkish when it comes to any of the non-OSU institutions building anymore, thank you Kent State...
3) I think the opportunity here is clearly the Hebrew Union College, as it is being significantly downsized to the point of near zero operations, has a beautiful, classical campus, and with the buildup around Clifton/MLK intersection, is contiguous with the Main Campus. Could very easily see that be an area for either residence or a new place to house some of the departments which will have to vacate Crosley in the coming years. Hell, that could be a whole campus provided to the Liberal Sciences, and McMicken could become the administrative building. Only problem is it is a half mile from the nearest residence hall, and requires students to cross two major thoroughfares. Would likely need permanent mass transit options dedicated to travelling to that area.
4) I don't think UC has a lot of opportunities left as nearly every square inch around campus has been gobbled up by various developers for the purposes of housing/multi-use space. That will obviously help with housing students, but it doesn't help with the lack of instructional spaces. I could very easily see some currently existing residence halls becoming Office and Instructional spaces in the near future as well (Dabney/French and Daniels come to mind).

This just brings things back to the point so many of us have said over the years...but, man, wouldn't it be nice to have Burnet Woods...

Build elevated walkways over Clifton Avenue and MLK. Grand Junction, CO, ten miles up the road from where I live, has several of them which are suitable for both pedestrians (stairs) and cyclists (approach ramps). I use them frequently on my bike rides. If a town of 65,000 in a metro (if you can call it that) of 160,000 or so can do it, so could Cincy and the university. Invite UC's architecture and engineering students to submit design ideas and pick the best one(s). If artfully done, they'd be an attractive addition to campus.
 
09-28-2022 09:27 AM
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BearcatMan Offline
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Post: #2970
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-28-2022 09:27 AM)colohank Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 02:15 PM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 02:02 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 01:42 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:00 AM)Cataclysmo Wrote:  So? We're expanding the school as a stated objective. Our academics consist of far more than acceptance rate and total student population, anyways.

There are schools like UCF that sacrifice academics to get there, and then there are schools like OSU that build toward massive student/faculty sizes over time by capitalizing on resources. UC has the infrastructure in place to get to 60K and compete with OSU, so they should do it. Importantly, I think one of our goals during this expansion is to get there without sacrificing too much of admissions standards.


What part of UC's "infrastructure" do you think is capable of supporting 60,000 students?

Genuinely curious.

That's a 24% increase over 2022 enrollment. My impression is that UC lacks the classroom space, dorm space, and office space for a 24% increase in students.


The new business building was too small for the entire business school on the day it opened (mostly because they made the building 2 stories smaller than originally planned to cut costs).

I've been wondering about this since I first read the proposal from President Pinto. To get to 60K they are going to have to do one or more of the following:

1) On-line
2) Building a Satellite Campus somewhere
3) Merging/bringing another institution in-house
4) Buying up more space around campus (clearing it and building onto the campus).
All good options...

1) That's going to be their biggest growth opportunity...UC Global Campus would be making a killing with some degrees, unfortunately the most significant programs within UC are the least replicable in an online setting.
2) They've already got two of those and the State has been VERY hawkish when it comes to any of the non-OSU institutions building anymore, thank you Kent State...
3) I think the opportunity here is clearly the Hebrew Union College, as it is being significantly downsized to the point of near zero operations, has a beautiful, classical campus, and with the buildup around Clifton/MLK intersection, is contiguous with the Main Campus. Could very easily see that be an area for either residence or a new place to house some of the departments which will have to vacate Crosley in the coming years. Hell, that could be a whole campus provided to the Liberal Sciences, and McMicken could become the administrative building. Only problem is it is a half mile from the nearest residence hall, and requires students to cross two major thoroughfares. Would likely need permanent mass transit options dedicated to travelling to that area.
4) I don't think UC has a lot of opportunities left as nearly every square inch around campus has been gobbled up by various developers for the purposes of housing/multi-use space. That will obviously help with housing students, but it doesn't help with the lack of instructional spaces. I could very easily see some currently existing residence halls becoming Office and Instructional spaces in the near future as well (Dabney/French and Daniels come to mind).

This just brings things back to the point so many of us have said over the years...but, man, wouldn't it be nice to have Burnet Woods...

Build elevated walkways over Clifton Avenue and MLK. Grand Junction, CO, ten miles up the road from where I live, has several of them which are suitable for both pedestrians (stairs) and cyclists (approach ramps). I use them frequently on my bike rides. If a town of 65,000 in a metro (if you can call it that) of 160,000 or so can do it, so could Cincy and the university. Invite UC's architecture and engineering students to submit design ideas and pick the best one(s). If artfully done, they'd be an attractive addition to campus.

Oh absolutely, I think that would have to be a step to ANY academic expansion past the existing boundary of campus over MLK or Clifton.
 
09-28-2022 10:27 AM
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Captain Bearcat Offline
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Post: #2971
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 02:15 PM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 02:02 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 01:42 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(09-26-2022 09:00 AM)Cataclysmo Wrote:  
(09-23-2022 03:11 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  Guys, UC is accepting 85% of the applicants to campus right now. The university wants to boost the number of CPS students and increase its enrollment to 60,000k by 2030. We are hardly in any place to mock Louisville’s academics.

So? We're expanding the school as a stated objective. Our academics consist of far more than acceptance rate and total student population, anyways.

There are schools like UCF that sacrifice academics to get there, and then there are schools like OSU that build toward massive student/faculty sizes over time by capitalizing on resources. UC has the infrastructure in place to get to 60K and compete with OSU, so they should do it. Importantly, I think one of our goals during this expansion is to get there without sacrificing too much of admissions standards.


What part of UC's "infrastructure" do you think is capable of supporting 60,000 students?

Genuinely curious.

That's a 24% increase over 2022 enrollment. My impression is that UC lacks the classroom space, dorm space, and office space for a 24% increase in students.


The new business building was too small for the entire business school on the day it opened (mostly because they made the building 2 stories smaller than originally planned to cut costs).

I've been wondering about this since I first read the proposal from President Pinto. To get to 60K they are going to have to do one or more of the following:

1) On-line
2) Building a Satellite Campus somewhere
3) Merging/bringing another institution in-house
4) Buying up more space around campus (clearing it and building onto the campus).
All good options...

1) That's going to be their biggest growth opportunity...UC Global Campus would be making a killing with some degrees, unfortunately the most significant programs within UC are the least replicable in an online setting.
2) They've already got two of those and the State has been VERY hawkish when it comes to any of the non-OSU institutions building anymore, thank you Kent State...
3) I think the opportunity here is clearly the Hebrew Union College, as it is being significantly downsized to the point of near zero operations, has a beautiful, classical campus, and with the buildup around Clifton/MLK intersection, is contiguous with the Main Campus. Could very easily see that be an area for either residence or a new place to house some of the departments which will have to vacate Crosley in the coming years. Hell, that could be a whole campus provided to the Liberal Sciences, and McMicken could become the administrative building. Only problem is it is a half mile from the nearest residence hall, and requires students to cross two major thoroughfares. Would likely need permanent mass transit options dedicated to travelling to that area.
4) I don't think UC has a lot of opportunities left as nearly every square inch around campus has been gobbled up by various developers for the purposes of housing/multi-use space. That will obviously help with housing students, but it doesn't help with the lack of instructional spaces. I could very easily see some currently existing residence halls becoming Office and Instructional spaces in the near future as well (Dabney/French and Daniels come to mind).

This just brings things back to the point so many of us have said over the years...but, man, wouldn't it be nice to have Burnet Woods...

A LOT of universities are trying to expand online enrollment. It's become a very crowded field.

For example, in the MBA field: why would someone pick UC online over UNC online or U of Illinois online? I can't think of a single student demographic or niche that UC could compete with them on.


Second, online education is inferior for achieving the university's goals.

If the university wants a vibrant campus, online education doesn't help that.

if the university wants engaged students, online education doesn't help that.

If the university wants higher alumni donations in the future... those donations come from students who enjoyed their time in college. That is highly correlated with being heavily engaged in on-campus activities.

If the university wants top-notch graduates, online education doesn't help that. Research indicates that a) online options are chosen by lower-quality students, and b) online education is frequently lower quality than classroom education.

Online education does help with diversity initiatives, particularly in attracting non-traditional students with jobs. Is the goal to add 10,000 non-traditional students? That's the opposite goal of increasing research or prestige. Also it will be difficult to accomplish - why would a nontraditional student pick UC over, say, Purdue Global (which has a huge lead over UC and a better brand name)?

Other than expanding access, the only thing online education brings is money. Money's a good thing, don't get me wrong... but you only get money if you get the enrollment. And that brings me back to the first point - online education has become a very crowded field.
 
09-28-2022 12:02 PM
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OKIcat Online
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Post: #2972
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
Excellent Dennis Dodd article posted an hour ago on CBS Sports about the state of realignment. Much of what's stated here has been leaking out in recent weeks but this seems to be a complete assessment of a likely scenario where the Pac 12 is picked apart.

https://www.cbssports.com/college-footba...est-looms/
 
09-28-2022 12:36 PM
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Post: #2973
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-27-2022 04:04 PM)Cataclysmo Wrote:  
(09-27-2022 01:42 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  What part of UC's "infrastructure" do you think is capable of supporting 60,000 students?

Genuinely curious.

That's a 24% increase over 2022 enrollment. My impression is that UC lacks the classroom space, dorm space, and office space for a 24% increase in students.


The new business building was too small for the entire business school on the day it opened (mostly because they made the building 2 stories smaller than originally planned to cut costs).

The physical infrastructure has a long way to go but I don't think classroom space, dorm availability, or office space should be the limiting factor for a major university - and that's an opinion that I think is reinforced by the expansion of our campus space over the last 10 to 20 years. When I started undergrad in 2014 the following buildings either did not exist, or did not exist in their current iteration:

Just completed: Morgens, Scioto Glass Renovation

Since completed:

-Nippert
-Dabney Hall
-Morgan's Hall
-Teacher's College
-College of Business
-1819 Innovation Hub
-Gardner Neuroscience Institute
-The uptown consortium off 71
-Health sciences building

Soon to be completed:

- Calhoun Hall renovation
- Old business renovation into new Law School

Approved projects/Likely Projects:

-YMCA Renovation
-Whatever is going in those sheds by DAAP (Engineering building?)


And that's not to mention to the countless off campus housing options being built. All in all, I just don't think physical space is the primary concern for UC. I think the region from St. Bernard down to OTR has enough infrastructure to accommodate another 10,000 people or so, eventually. I mean, there's certainly no shortage of development occurring in the area.

More important is whether we can continue to recruit the talent that belongs at UC and keeps admission standards respectable (UC does have too high of an acceptance rate, I agree) while hiring faculty with potential to conduct valuable research. I was personally impressed with many of the new, younger Engineering professors that were brought on when I was in grad school. I know it's not the same for every college but I do feel that Cincinnati and UC are doing the right things to attract talent for a potential expansion.

Aha, you meant traffic & parking infrastructure. On that point, I agree. The opening of the MLK exit gave uptown a lot more traffic capacity.


I disagree on housing infrastructure though. UC absolutely needs more housing in the area if we're adding 12,000 students in the next 8 years.

UC has 7,500 on-campus beds, and they're full right now. (link)

Off campus housing is at a premium too. There's only about 14,000 housing units around campus. Although the vast majority are multiple occupancy, an awful lot of the houses are occupied by non-students.

Housing Units by neighborhood, 2020 US Census (I don't think this includes on-campus dorm rooms):
Clifton: 4,118
CUF: 7,517
Corryville: 2,362
Total: 13,997
 
09-28-2022 01:04 PM
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Cataclysmo Offline
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Post: #2974
RE: All Things Realignment 2.0
(09-28-2022 01:04 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  Aha, you meant traffic & parking infrastructure. On that point, I agree. The opening of the MLK exit gave uptown a lot more traffic capacity.


I disagree on housing infrastructure though. UC absolutely needs more housing in the area if we're adding 12,000 students in the next 8 years.

UC has 7,500 on-campus beds, and they're full right now. (link)

Off campus housing is at a premium too. There's only about 14,000 housing units around campus. Although the vast majority are multiple occupancy, an awful lot of the houses are occupied by non-students.

Housing Units by neighborhood, 2020 US Census (I don't think this includes on-campus dorm rooms):
Clifton: 4,118
CUF: 7,517
Corryville: 2,362
Total: 13,997

I don't really know much about how residential areas develop, but it seems like the apartment options available at UC outpaced the growth of students. Those 5+1 "luxury lofts" are everywhere now, and developers really seem to enjoy targeting college aged/post-graduate demographics.

Obviously much of that is backfilling to catch up with the increased demand on/near campus (as we transitioned from a commuter school), but is there reason to believe it can't continue?
 
09-28-2022 02:19 PM
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