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The Last Ten Years
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OKIcat Offline
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Post: #41
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:19 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  The Oakland neighborhood in Pittsburgh is so tight, getting in and out of old Pitt stadium was quite the task. I had to do a hospital call up at UPMC-Presby a couple of years back at the tip- off time of a sPitt game at the Peterson. (The main entrance to the hospital is across the street from the main entrance to the arena...) No problems whatsoever. (The game was sparsely attended.) When I remarked that to the hospital staff, they laughed and said how different the situation was from the days when the football stadium was there...

Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still expanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

That Cathedral of Learning may be the most unique and iconic building on any American campus--it's very cool indeed. I haven't seen Heinz Chapel but Pittsburgh has some amazing and enduring architecture in public buildings, churches and schools. A legacy left by a generation of business founders who made enormous contributions to that city through their philanthropy.
 
06-11-2020 09:08 AM
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Bearcat 1985 Offline
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Post: #42
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 09:08 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:19 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  The Oakland neighborhood in Pittsburgh is so tight, getting in and out of old Pitt stadium was quite the task. I had to do a hospital call up at UPMC-Presby a couple of years back at the tip- off time of a sPitt game at the Peterson. (The main entrance to the hospital is across the street from the main entrance to the arena...) No problems whatsoever. (The game was sparsely attended.) When I remarked that to the hospital staff, they laughed and said how different the situation was from the days when the football stadium was there...

Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still eft.xpanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

That Cathedral of Learning may be the most unique and iconic building on any American campus--it's very cool indeed. I haven't seen Heinz Chapel but Pittsburgh has some amazing and enduring architecture in public buildings, churches and schools. A legacy left by a generation of business founders who made enormous contributions to that city through their philanthropy.

I've said it before that if the Cincinnati business and old money establishment had invested in UC in the same way that their peers in Pittsburgh invested in Pitt, we would have entered the state system on a much more equal footing with OSU a'la Pitt-Penn State than we did. Instead, they were content to build up the medical school while allowing the rest of the university to languish. We also would have been clearly dominant to the rest of the state system and wouldn't need to be fighting to carve out our reputation as the secondary flagship/research university today.
 
06-11-2020 11:05 AM
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BearcatMan Offline
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Post: #43
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 11:05 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 09:08 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:19 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  The Oakland neighborhood in Pittsburgh is so tight, getting in and out of old Pitt stadium was quite the task. I had to do a hospital call up at UPMC-Presby a couple of years back at the tip- off time of a sPitt game at the Peterson. (The main entrance to the hospital is across the street from the main entrance to the arena...) No problems whatsoever. (The game was sparsely attended.) When I remarked that to the hospital staff, they laughed and said how different the situation was from the days when the football stadium was there...

Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still eft.xpanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

That Cathedral of Learning may be the most unique and iconic building on any American campus--it's very cool indeed. I haven't seen Heinz Chapel but Pittsburgh has some amazing and enduring architecture in public buildings, churches and schools. A legacy left by a generation of business founders who made enormous contributions to that city through their philanthropy.

I've said it before that if the Cincinnati business and old money establishment had invested in UC in the same way that their peers in Pittsburgh invested in Pitt, we would have entered the state system on a much more equal footing with OSU a'la Pitt-Penn State than we did. Instead, they were content to build up the medical school while allowing the rest of the university to languish. We also would have been clearly dominant to the rest of the state system and wouldn't need to be fighting to carve out our reputation as the secondary flagship/research university today.

Well...the Gamble family at least threw money at the football team 03-lmfao
 
06-11-2020 11:13 AM
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colohank Online
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Post: #44
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:19 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  The Oakland neighborhood in Pittsburgh is so tight, getting in and out of old Pitt stadium was quite the task. I had to do a hospital call up at UPMC-Presby a couple of years back at the tip- off time of a sPitt game at the Peterson. (The main entrance to the hospital is across the street from the main entrance to the arena...) No problems whatsoever. (The game was sparsely attended.) When I remarked that to the hospital staff, they laughed and said how different the situation was from the days when the football stadium was there...

Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still expanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

I recall a lengthy interview on the old Charlie Rose show on PBS (a few years before he was discredited and canned) devoted to the architectural renaissance of the UC campus. Perhaps none of our signature buildings is quite so noble as the Cathedral of Learning, but as a collection they're an impressive resource. Let them age a bit, and if well maintained, they'll also be revered.

Some years ago, I bought a copy at the UC bookstore of "The Campus Guide --University of Cincinnati -- An Architectural Tour" by Paul Bennett. At the time, there were only a few other schools listed in the Campus Guide series published by the Princeton Architectural Press. They included: Princeton University, the University of Virginia, Phillips Academy, Cranbrook, Duke University, and Harvard University. That puts UC in some pretty good company, I think.
 
06-11-2020 12:41 PM
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CliftonAve Offline
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Post: #45
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 11:13 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 11:05 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 09:08 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still eft.xpanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

That Cathedral of Learning may be the most unique and iconic building on any American campus--it's very cool indeed. I haven't seen Heinz Chapel but Pittsburgh has some amazing and enduring architecture in public buildings, churches and schools. A legacy left by a generation of business founders who made enormous contributions to that city through their philanthropy.

I've said it before that if the Cincinnati business and old money establishment had invested in UC in the same way that their peers in Pittsburgh invested in Pitt, we would have entered the state system on a much more equal footing with OSU a'la Pitt-Penn State than we did. Instead, they were content to build up the medical school while allowing the rest of the university to languish. We also would have been clearly dominant to the rest of the state system and wouldn't need to be fighting to carve out our reputation as the secondary flagship/research university today.

Well...the Gamble family at least threw money at the football team 03-lmfao

Big difference between us and Pitt back then was UC was municipally funded. There was no state money coming in so all the money from the fat wallet crowd had to pay for the operation of the entire university.

The other distinction was back in those days UC was content in matching up in sports against XU, Miami, Ohio and Dayton. Meanwhile Pitt was playing Notre Dame, WVU, Syracuse and Navy every year. 2/4 teams we played either dropped football or went down to the FCS.
 
06-11-2020 01:10 PM
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BearcatMan Offline
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Post: #46
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 12:41 PM)colohank Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:19 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  The Oakland neighborhood in Pittsburgh is so tight, getting in and out of old Pitt stadium was quite the task. I had to do a hospital call up at UPMC-Presby a couple of years back at the tip- off time of a sPitt game at the Peterson. (The main entrance to the hospital is across the street from the main entrance to the arena...) No problems whatsoever. (The game was sparsely attended.) When I remarked that to the hospital staff, they laughed and said how different the situation was from the days when the football stadium was there...

Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still expanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

I recall a lengthy interview on the old Charlie Rose show on PBS (a few years before he was discredited and canned) devoted to the architectural renaissance of the UC campus. Perhaps none of our signature buildings is quite so noble as the Cathedral of Learning, but as a collection they're an impressive resource. Let them age a bit, and if well maintained, they'll also be revered.

Some years ago, I bought a copy at the UC bookstore of "The Campus Guide --University of Cincinnati -- An Architectural Tour" by Paul Bennett. At the time, there were only a few other schools listed in the Campus Guide series published by the Princeton Architectural Press. They included: Princeton University, the University of Virginia, Phillips Academy, Cranbrook, Duke University, and Harvard University. That puts UC in some pretty good company, I think.

What our campus has that many of the other, more "classical" campuses don't is an infusion of leading modern architectural design...which in it's own way is as striking as a gothic revival monolith. Having said that, if you grew up wishing you could walk the hall of Hogwarts, there is something that the Commons in the Cathedral of Learning or the Michigan Law Library does to you when you walk through them that a Frank Gehry designed neo-modern bubble dome cant.
 
(This post was last modified: 06-11-2020 01:12 PM by BearcatMan.)
06-11-2020 01:11 PM
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Bearcat 1985 Offline
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Post: #47
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 01:10 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 11:13 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 11:05 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 09:08 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

That Cathedral of Learning may be the most unique and iconic building on any American campus--it's very cool indeed. I haven't seen Heinz Chapel but Pittsburgh has some amazing and enduring architecture in public buildings, churches and schools. A legacy left by a generation of business founders who made enormous contributions to that city through their philanthropy.

I've said it before that if the Cincinnati business and old money establishment had invested in UC in the same way that their peers in Pittsburgh invested in Pitt, we would have entered the state system on a much more equal footing with OSU a'la Pitt-Penn State than we did. Instead, they were content to build up the medical school while allowing the rest of the university to languish. We also would have been clearly dominant to the rest of the state system and wouldn't need to be fighting to carve out our reputation as the secondary flagship/research university today.

Well...the Gamble family at least threw money at the football team 03-lmfao

Big difference between us and Pitt back then was UC was municipally funded. There was no state money coming in so all the money from the fat wallet crowd had to pay for the operation of the entire university.

The other distinction was back in those days UC was content in matching up in sports against XU, Miami, Ohio and Dayton. Meanwhile Pitt was playing Notre Dame, WVU, Syracuse and Navy every year. 2/4 teams we played either dropped football or went down to the FCS.

I always thought that Pitt was also a municipal university. I did some research and found out that, until 1966, they were fully private, so they had no state or metropolitan money coming in. And even after they were designated as "state affiliated" the money seems to have been a fraction of what the Big Ten states were funding. What's interesting that I found on the wiki page was that when they founded a law school Andrew Carnegie, George Westinghouse and Andrew Mellon were all on the initial board of trustees. Again, I think that's indicative of the city's elite leadership taking a much broader view of funding and growing the university than what happened in Cincinnati. And obviously it led them to coming into the system as a more or less peer to Penn State and entry into the AAU almost 50 years ago.
 
06-11-2020 05:51 PM
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BearcatJerry Offline
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Post: #48
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 12:41 PM)colohank Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 02:57 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:51 PM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(06-10-2020 01:19 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  The Oakland neighborhood in Pittsburgh is so tight, getting in and out of old Pitt stadium was quite the task. I had to do a hospital call up at UPMC-Presby a couple of years back at the tip- off time of a sPitt game at the Peterson. (The main entrance to the hospital is across the street from the main entrance to the arena...) No problems whatsoever. (The game was sparsely attended.) When I remarked that to the hospital staff, they laughed and said how different the situation was from the days when the football stadium was there...

Interesting insight. I'm in the Oakland area about once a year on business myself. While I like it and respect Pitt in terms of their research and academics, I don't think its campus compares favorably with UC at all.

While UC is still expanding outside of what's referred to by some as the "superblock" (bounded by Calhoun/Clifton/MLK/Jefferson) that west campus core is pretty amazing now with the architecture and green space that you rarely find at major universities within major cities.

I agree, on the whole...

The one thing the Pitt campus has going for it are the signature buildings: the "Cathedral of Learning" and Heinz Chapel. It is almost unimaginable that either of those two buildings could ever be built in this current climate, and they are the "brand" for the University of Pittsburgh. UC's buildings don't stand out in the same fashion.

I recall a lengthy interview on the old Charlie Rose show on PBS (a few years before he was discredited and canned) devoted to the architectural renaissance of the UC campus. Perhaps none of our signature buildings is quite so noble as the Cathedral of Learning, but as a collection they're an impressive resource. Let them age a bit, and if well maintained, they'll also be revered.

Some years ago, I bought a copy at the UC bookstore of "The Campus Guide --University of Cincinnati -- An Architectural Tour" by Paul Bennett. At the time, there were only a few other schools listed in the Campus Guide series published by the Princeton Architectural Press. They included: Princeton University, the University of Virginia, Phillips Academy, Cranbrook, Duke University, and Harvard University. That puts UC in some pretty good company, I think.

The thing is that the "Cathedral of Learning" is not only beautiful...it stands out in the skyline. It literally is a beacon for the University. You walk/drive towards it and it brings you there. UC's campus doesn't have a similar landmark. Even Nippert Stadium sits low.

I'm not trying to run the campus down, but Pitt has an advantage in those two massive and beautiful buildings that I don't think we will ever have.
 
06-11-2020 06:05 PM
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UCGrad1992 Offline
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Post: #49
RE: The Last Ten Years
Why are you not acknowleding the classic UC monolith?

[Image: 19406222_23552f4bb3_b.jpg]
 
06-11-2020 06:22 PM
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RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 06:22 PM)UCGrad1992 Wrote:  Why are you not acknowleding the classic UC monolith?

[Image: 19406222_23552f4bb3_b.jpg]

The massive gray phallus that overshadoweth Clifton...

Had many chemistry recitations in that building.

Truly a creepy place.
 
06-11-2020 09:29 PM
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BearcatJerry Offline
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Post: #51
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 09:29 PM)Bearcatbdub Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 06:22 PM)UCGrad1992 Wrote:  Why are you not acknowleding the classic UC monolith?

[Image: 19406222_23552f4bb3_b.jpg]

The massive gray phallus that overshadoweth Clifton...

Had many chemistry recitations in that building.

Truly a creepy place.
03-lmfao

Point taken and conceded.
 
06-11-2020 10:14 PM
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Z-Fly Offline
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Post: #52
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-11-2020 10:14 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 09:29 PM)Bearcatbdub Wrote:  
(06-11-2020 06:22 PM)UCGrad1992 Wrote:  Why are you not acknowleding the classic UC monolith?

[Image: 19406222_23552f4bb3_b.jpg]

The massive gray phallus that overshadoweth Clifton...

Had many chemistry recitations in that building.

Truly a creepy place.
03-lmfao

Point taken and conceded.

You can see that thing all the way from Finneytown.
 
06-12-2020 05:45 AM
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OKIcat Offline
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Post: #53
RE: The Last Ten Years
Sadly, Sander Hall did dominate the Uptown skyline like no other building and is prominent even in some panoramic photos of downtown. But it was an eyesore, particularly as it deteriorated before our eyes.

Regarding Crosley Tower, a UC math professor told me decades ago, referencing former UC President Walter Langsam, that the faculty called the building "Langsam's Last Erection".

It tops my list of campus eyesores which we'll hope may soon be removed. The others are the remaining base level of Sander Hall and the modular buildings in the former Wilson Auditorium footprint. It could be argued that all three of these structures occupy high visibility locations and really detract from our amazing campus buildings and grounds and fail to create good first impressions for visitors.
 
06-12-2020 07:31 AM
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Lush Offline
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RE: The Last Ten Years
but it's brutalist architecture. you don't see that everyday
 
06-12-2020 02:50 PM
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Bruce Monnin Offline
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RE: The Last Ten Years
Isn't it something like the second largest single pour concrete structure in the world, behind some dam?
 
06-12-2020 03:38 PM
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colohank Online
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RE: The Last Ten Years
Cathedral-Of-Learning envy is a serious matter, made worse by the Pitt cheerleaders' chants to the scattered fans in that sparsely populated stadium they're obliged to use.

Our Cathedral Of Learning,
Your unrequited yearning.
You guys cruise, our guys lose,
Wannstedt, Wannstedt, rah rah rah.


Accordingly, I propose a couple of remedies: (1) get some housemovers to lift McMicken several hundred feet off its foundations. Then install and compact a monstrous fill beneath the building and lower McMicken back onto its new, more prominent elevation, or (2) erect an enormous Ferris Wheel on campus, something which dwarfs the Eye of London, for example. Each gondola a classroom, and a money-making tourist attraction on weekends.

C'mon, all you mechanical and civil engineers, git 'er done.
 
06-12-2020 05:53 PM
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Bruce Monnin Offline
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Post: #57
RE: The Last Ten Years
I was thinking one of those nice skyrides like at the state fair. Goes from the top of Crosley Tower right to Great American Ballpark. You get to view Over The Rhine from above.
 
06-12-2020 07:14 PM
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Post: #58
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-12-2020 07:31 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  Sadly, Sander Hall did dominate the Uptown skyline like no other building and is prominent even in some panoramic photos of downtown. But it was an eyesore, particularly as it deteriorated before our eyes.

Regarding Crosley Tower, a UC math professor told me decades ago, referencing former UC President Walter Langsam, that the faculty called the building "Langsam's Last Erection".

It tops my list of campus eyesores which we'll hope may soon be removed. The others are the remaining base level of Sander Hall and the modular buildings in the former Wilson Auditorium footprint. It could be argued that all three of these structures occupy high visibility locations and really detract from our amazing campus buildings and grounds and fail to create good first impressions for visitors.

What's the base level of Sanders hall? The modular buildings where Wilson was are going to be removed. They already announced a permanent structure is in the works and I think they are looking for architecture firms currently. I can't wait for Crosley tower to come down. Be interesting to see what they put in its place. The new DAAP building is complete I think, or close to it. They are doing work on the Church at the corner of Clifton and Probasco. You can newly installed ventilation work outside the building. I also don't think they will keep the ground surface lots across from DAAP. Seems like a big waste of space. I'm pretty sure the university also bought the old YMCA by Siddall and Calhoun.
 
06-13-2020 12:40 AM
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BearcatMan Offline
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Post: #59
RE: The Last Ten Years
(06-12-2020 05:53 PM)colohank Wrote:  Cathedral-Of-Learning envy is a serious matter, made worse by the Pitt cheerleaders' chants to the scattered fans in that sparsely populated stadium they're obliged to use.

Our Cathedral Of Learning,
Your unrequited yearning.
You guys cruise, our guys lose,
Wannstedt, Wannstedt, rah rah rah.


Accordingly, I propose a couple of remedies: (1) get some housemovers to lift McMicken several hundred feet off its foundations. Then install and compact a monstrous fill beneath the building and lower McMicken back onto its new, more prominent elevation, or (2) erect an enormous Ferris Wheel on campus, something which dwarfs the Eye of London, for example. Each gondola a classroom, and a money-making tourist attraction on weekends.

C'mon, all you mechanical and civil engineers, git 'er done.

In true Civil Engineer vs. Architecture form...I can give you 147 reasons why I can't build that 03-lmfao
 
06-13-2020 07:31 AM
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