Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
Author Message
Bookmark and Share
Bearcatdh58 Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 446
Joined: Mar 2018
Reputation: 14
I Root For: Cincinnati
Location:
Post: #101
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
UConn expected to drop from 24 sports to 16 by end of June.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using CSNbbs mobile app
 
05-24-2020 01:27 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Bearcatbdub Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 5,360
Joined: May 2006
Reputation: 86
I Root For: The 'Cats! duh!
Location: Union, KY
Post: #102
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(05-24-2020 08:43 AM)Bruce Monnin Wrote:  I just drove near Xavier the other day. That was an ugly looking neighborhood.

“You will know them by they homeliness of their womenfolk, and their sanctimonious attitude.”
 
05-25-2020 09:10 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
dsquare Offline
All American
*

Posts: 2,696
Joined: Aug 2016
Reputation: 54
I Root For: Cincy
Location:
Post: #103
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(05-24-2020 01:27 PM)Bearcatdh58 Wrote:  UConn expected to drop from 24 sports to 16 by end of June.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using CSNbbs mobile app

I'd be shocked if football isn't dropped sooner rather than later. Good luck recruiting to that dumpster fire. Edsall's last stop.
 
05-25-2020 09:23 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
UCGrad1992 Offline
Hall of Famer
*

Posts: 18,710
Joined: Sep 2013
Reputation: 1093
I Root For: Cincy Bearcats
Location: North Carolina
Post: #104
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
From the Hartford Courant...

Quote:Mike Anthony: The only answer for UConn is to cut numerous athletic programs

Years into an expanding fiscal nightmare that includes a gap between revenue and expenses of more than $40 million, the UConn athletic department is well past the point of combining half-measures with belt-tightening in search of a sustainable remedy.

The time has come to blow up the operational model in place — by lopping off the bottom third of it.

UConn must do away with some teams and programs.

A bunch of them.

Eight of the existing 24, I’d say.

That’s awful to write or suggest for many reasons, primarily the ruination of college experiences and the elimination of jobs and people that comes with such extreme action.

It is sad. But I don’t see any way around it.

The university is toiling in its own fiscal quagmire, facing estimated revenue losses between $65 million and $129 million, depending on when students return to campus. “Deep cuts” are necessary, UConn chief financial officer Scott Jordan told the Board of Trustees this week, and the onus has been placed on entities campuswide to play a significant part in forming a solution.

The athletic department’s responsibility is to create a 25 percent reduction to that $40-plus million gap by 2023. That means a three-year plan toward shedding $10 million off an annual university subsidy that allows the Huskies to make ends meet.

It is a mountain of money.

The Big East-bound Huskies can sell more tickets and, yes, fans are purchasing basketball seats at a highly encouraging rate, even in the midst of a pandemic that has decimated the economy. UConn can slash budgets, curtail travel, tweak other operational expenses, find all sorts of ways to save a buck here and there.

It won’t get them to $10 million.

It won’t equal a long-term fix.

UConn athletics must reinvent itself, embrace a painful last resort, the only viable option.

UConn, which has more than 650 student-athletes in a given year, sponsors six more programs than the Big East average of 18, and more than most of its NCAA Division I peers.

Don’t do that anymore. Get down to 16, the minimum required for Division I participation. Know how bad it looks and feels but understand that, on the other side, you can tell remaining teams and people the following:

This is awful and we hate it but it is necessary. It will not happen to you. As we move forward, your program will have the support of the department and university in ways that will allow you to compete at the highest levels, always. We are moving forward with a model in which we can all achieve the success we dream of. You will have everything you need.

There is a budget workshop scheduled for June 12, at which point an athletic department proposal is expected to be submitted. And there is a Board of Trustees meeting scheduled for June 24, at which point that proposal is expected to be voted on.

“I think that’s going to be a decision that we have to make,” athletic director David Benedict said Friday when asked about cutting sports. “The numbers around the country are what they are and we are an outlier among our peers when it comes to the number of sports we sponsor … and the number of student-athletes we sponsor and, in turn, we’re an outlier in the subsidy.”

Time To Make Fiscal Sense [Cents]
 
05-25-2020 09:42 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
TubaCat Offline
1st Chair
*

Posts: 2,381
Joined: Sep 2014
Reputation: 88
I Root For: Bearcats, tubas
Location: Murphy's
Post: #105
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
This is my first time seeing this thread. At first glance of the thread title, I thought it was going to be about people in the UC athletic department that we wanted to infect with COVID-19 and thought, "oh my God, this is horrifying... 6 pages!? I mean, Marty Ludwig doesn't even work in the AD, so who could it be!?"
 
05-25-2020 10:27 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ZCat Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 303
Joined: Sep 2018
Reputation: 12
I Root For: UC
Location:
Post: #106
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 06:35 AM)Ohio Poly Wrote:  
(05-15-2020 10:02 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  NEOMED kind of built that footprint, and I've been on the bandwagon for all of the secondary regional schools to do something similar for years as you know.

None of them will agree to be merged into another. It will only happen if some form of new independent name-neutral umbrella university is formed for them to join. Which would be an instant AAC school.

Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.
Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?
 
Yesterday 10:05 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ZCat Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 303
Joined: Sep 2018
Reputation: 12
I Root For: UC
Location:
Post: #107
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(05-17-2020 12:20 PM)CliftonAve Wrote:  
(05-17-2020 09:31 AM)mptnstr@44 Wrote:  
(05-17-2020 09:22 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  UC has done an enormous job since moving to selective admissions, and within a decade, passed OU by. The next step is going to require a lot more work and positioning of the university as the clear-cut alternative to OSU and Miami and not just one of the pack.

A friend sent this to me because he knows I follow this kind of stuff. Loveland High School's top 10 graduating seniors: 1 is going to Notre Dame, and 9 are going to OSU. This isn't in Cleveland; it's right in our back yard.

I think it also speaks to the precarious position Miami has found itself in within Ohio and backs up the quote I saw stating that nine out of ten Ohio kids with offers to OSU and Miami choose OSU. Should Miami's Chicago pipeline dry up because of COVID, they are in real trouble. UC, on the other hand, hasn't overextended itself with out of state students. In fact, we have a huge potential for growth just be extending our brand to the rest of Ohio, but first we need to get more top ten type kids from our own backyard.

I up near Loveland and it has a strange concentration of tOSU fans here. I guess it is the easy access to I71N to go up to CBus. There is also a weird fear of Clifton as urban inner city in these parts...as if tOSU isn't in an urban inner city area.

Yup. As someone who has lived Columbus and now lives in Loveland I have these discussions with people all the time:

Loveland/Mason/West Chester Dad: Oh my god, I am not sending my daughter down to the hood (UC). She is going to OSU.

The fact is that part of Columbus might be worse than Clifton, especially when you pull up the crime reports and see all the rapes, murders, and other varieties of crime. For some reason, people think when they go to OSU they will be in a suburban setting.

Well It’s UC’s job to change that perception. Very actively get people down to campus. Pick them up, take them on a driving tour around campus, including Calhoun Street. and throughout campus.
 
Yesterday 10:09 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ZCat Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 303
Joined: Sep 2018
Reputation: 12
I Root For: UC
Location:
Post: #108
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(05-17-2020 09:22 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  UC has done an enormous job since moving to selective admissions, and within a decade, passed OU by. The next step is going to require a lot more work and positioning of the university as the clear-cut alternative to OSU and Miami and not just one of the pack.

A friend sent this to me because he knows I follow this kind of stuff. Loveland High School's top 10 graduating seniors: 1 is going to Notre Dame, and 9 are going to OSU. This isn't in Cleveland; it's right in our back yard.

I think it also speaks to the precarious position Miami has found itself in within Ohio and backs up the quote I saw stating that nine out of ten Ohio kids with offers to OSU and Miami choose OSU. Should Miami's Chicago pipeline dry up because of COVID, they are in real trouble. UC, on the other hand, hasn't overextended itself with out of state students. In fact, we have a huge potential for growth just be extending our brand to the rest of Ohio, but first we need to get more top ten type kids from our own backyard.

I’ve always Wondered how hard we go after these top 10 type kids? Does anyone know what the normal procedure is?

I’m guessing grades are private unless they designate standardized test scores to be released to certain schools. What if a top 10 kid does not list us when they take the SAT?

Can we approach the schools? Go directly to each high school and really make our presence felt.

WE SHOULD BE VERY AGGRESSIVE AND VISIBLE FOR ALL THE BEST STUDENTS AND ATHLETES.

According to some stats on this thread, looks like we do get a big chunk from Saint Xavier and Walnut Hills which is great.
 
Today 04:17 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
OKIcat Offline
All American
*

Posts: 3,892
Joined: Sep 2015
Reputation: 104
I Root For: Cincinnati
Location:
Post: #109
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Yesterday 10:05 PM)ZCat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 06:35 AM)Ohio Poly Wrote:  
(05-15-2020 10:02 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  NEOMED kind of built that footprint, and I've been on the bandwagon for all of the secondary regional schools to do something similar for years as you know.

None of them will agree to be merged into another. It will only happen if some form of new independent name-neutral umbrella university is formed for them to join. Which would be an instant AAC school.

Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.
Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?

Bolded, at this point, I'd be shocked with any name change. There is considerable brand equity in the University of Cincinnati in 2020. The city itself isn't a liability--its well regarded by most nationally as a corporate center; possessing a high quality of life, low cost of living and major league sports, arts and cultural options.

Ohio Tech could have been adopted when it was discussed decades ago--before the rebuild of the physical campus, academics and athletics that brought an influx of new students and fans to Clifton. To do it now would be costly and in my mind, counterproductive.
 
Today 07:47 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Bearcat 1985 Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 421
Joined: Oct 2016
Reputation: 38
I Root For: Cincinnati
Location:
Post: #110
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 07:47 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:05 PM)ZCat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 06:35 AM)Ohio Poly Wrote:  None of them will agree to be merged into another. It will only happen if some form of new independent name-neutral umbrella university is formed for them to join. Which would be an instant AAC school.

Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.
Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?

Bolded, at this point, I'd be shocked with any name change. There is considerable brand equity in the University of Cincinnati in 2020. The city itself isn't a liability--its well regarded by most nationally as a corporate center; possessing a high quality of life, low cost of living and major league sports, arts and cultural options.

Ohio Tech could have been adopted when it was discussed decades ago--before the rebuild of the physical campus, academics and athletics that brought an influx of new students and fans to Clifton. To do it now would be costly and in my mind, counterproductive.

UC doesn't need to change its name. When Akron attempted to take on the Ohio Tech name a couple of years ago, it was the clear sign of a desperate, failing institution trying to rebrand itself. Regardless of what challenges UC faces, it's not a desperate, failing institution. Does anyone think the University of Pittsburgh would, for one minute, think of changing its name to Pennsylvania Tech? No, and neither would the University of Cincinnati.
 
Today 08:21 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ZCat Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 303
Joined: Sep 2018
Reputation: 12
I Root For: UC
Location:
Post: #111
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 08:21 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(Today 07:47 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:05 PM)ZCat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.
Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?

Bolded, at this point, I'd be shocked with any name change. There is considerable brand equity in the University of Cincinnati in 2020. The city itself isn't a liability--its well regarded by most nationally as a corporate center; possessing a high quality of life, low cost of living and major league sports, arts and cultural options.

Ohio Tech could have been adopted when it was discussed decades ago--before the rebuild of the physical campus, academics and athletics that brought an influx of new students and fans to Clifton. To do it now would be costly and in my mind, counterproductive.

UC doesn't need to change its name. When Akron attempted to take on the Ohio Tech name a couple of years ago, it was the clear sign of a desperate, failing institution trying to rebrand itself. Regardless of what challenges UC faces, it's not a desperate, failing institution. Does anyone think the University of Pittsburgh would, for one minute, think of changing its name to Pennsylvania Tech? No, and neither would the University of Cincinnati.

I was more thinking if there was a way to brand ourselves as the number 2 flag ship in the state. How do we accomplish that?
 
(This post was last modified: Today 09:32 AM by ZCat.)
Today 09:31 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
bearcatmark Online
Moderator
*

Posts: 20,952
Joined: Dec 2006
Reputation: 428
I Root For: the Deliverator
Location:
Post: #112
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 09:31 AM)ZCat Wrote:  
(Today 08:21 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(Today 07:47 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:05 PM)ZCat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.
Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?

Bolded, at this point, I'd be shocked with any name change. There is considerable brand equity in the University of Cincinnati in 2020. The city itself isn't a liability--its well regarded by most nationally as a corporate center; possessing a high quality of life, low cost of living and major league sports, arts and cultural options.

Ohio Tech could have been adopted when it was discussed decades ago--before the rebuild of the physical campus, academics and athletics that brought an influx of new students and fans to Clifton. To do it now would be costly and in my mind, counterproductive.

UC doesn't need to change its name. When Akron attempted to take on the Ohio Tech name a couple of years ago, it was the clear sign of a desperate, failing institution trying to rebrand itself. Regardless of what challenges UC faces, it's not a desperate, failing institution. Does anyone think the University of Pittsburgh would, for one minute, think of changing its name to Pennsylvania Tech? No, and neither would the University of Cincinnati.

I was more thinking if there was a way to brand ourselves as the number 2 flag ship in the state. How do we accomplish that?

I think we pretty clearly are the number 2 flag ship in the state. It's just OSU's gravitational pull is great. I don't think a name change would change that.
 
Today 09:41 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Cataclysmo Offline
All American
*

Posts: 4,386
Joined: Feb 2013
Reputation: 149
I Root For: Cincinnat
Location: Cincinnati
Post: #113
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
UC Announces Furlough for 360 staff employees from June 1st to July 30th, some in athletics.

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/20...279575002/
 
Today 10:02 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
CliftonAve Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 16,048
Joined: May 2012
Reputation: 587
I Root For: CinCity Pride
Location:
Post: #114
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 09:41 AM)bearcatmark Wrote:  
(Today 09:31 AM)ZCat Wrote:  
(Today 08:21 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(Today 07:47 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:05 PM)ZCat Wrote:  Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?

Bolded, at this point, I'd be shocked with any name change. There is considerable brand equity in the University of Cincinnati in 2020. The city itself isn't a liability--its well regarded by most nationally as a corporate center; possessing a high quality of life, low cost of living and major league sports, arts and cultural options.

Ohio Tech could have been adopted when it was discussed decades ago--before the rebuild of the physical campus, academics and athletics that brought an influx of new students and fans to Clifton. To do it now would be costly and in my mind, counterproductive.

UC doesn't need to change its name. When Akron attempted to take on the Ohio Tech name a couple of years ago, it was the clear sign of a desperate, failing institution trying to rebrand itself. Regardless of what challenges UC faces, it's not a desperate, failing institution. Does anyone think the University of Pittsburgh would, for one minute, think of changing its name to Pennsylvania Tech? No, and neither would the University of Cincinnati.

I was more thinking if there was a way to brand ourselves as the number 2 flag ship in the state. How do we accomplish that?

I think we pretty clearly are the number 2 flag ship in the state. It's just OSU's gravitational pull is great. I don't think a name change would change that.

Agree the name change would not do anything. That being said I’d like to see the gap between us at #2 and the rest widen. Do anyone think it would beneficial to buy up another school school- ie, Wright State or Akron and slap the UC logo on it and all over their city? It could be another regional campus, and what’s more that community would be more aware of UC.
 
Today 10:14 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
OKIcat Offline
All American
*

Posts: 3,892
Joined: Sep 2015
Reputation: 104
I Root For: Cincinnati
Location:
Post: #115
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 09:31 AM)ZCat Wrote:  
(Today 08:21 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(Today 07:47 AM)OKIcat Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:05 PM)ZCat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.
Really enjoyed reading through the whole thread.
Obviously this is an area of interest and knowledge base for you and a couple others. I really hope what you said above happens. Just because you open a state university and have some PhD program. Doesn’t mean the state has to help pay for some crappy ones.

Any chance we change to name to Ohio tech ( like Ga tech)? I’ve read on here about that before.
Is UC In the red or black? How much?

Bolded, at this point, I'd be shocked with any name change. There is considerable brand equity in the University of Cincinnati in 2020. The city itself isn't a liability--its well regarded by most nationally as a corporate center; possessing a high quality of life, low cost of living and major league sports, arts and cultural options.

Ohio Tech could have been adopted when it was discussed decades ago--before the rebuild of the physical campus, academics and athletics that brought an influx of new students and fans to Clifton. To do it now would be costly and in my mind, counterproductive.

UC doesn't need to change its name. When Akron attempted to take on the Ohio Tech name a couple of years ago, it was the clear sign of a desperate, failing institution trying to rebrand itself. Regardless of what challenges UC faces, it's not a desperate, failing institution. Does anyone think the University of Pittsburgh would, for one minute, think of changing its name to Pennsylvania Tech? No, and neither would the University of Cincinnati.

I was more thinking if there was a way to brand ourselves as the number 2 flag ship in the state. How do we accomplish that?

Now there's some real opportunity there in my mind too. The University of Virginia is usually among the top ten public research universities and widely respected. Virginia Tech used a tagline, "Virginia's other great research university" in the past. I liked that as VT is really strong on academics and research too yet they weren't shouting "we're number two" but chose to play off of Virginia's excellence while separating from the other public universities in their state.

A well conceived marketing and branding effort by UC could help. All of us familiar with UC know the institutional bona fides that separate UC from the pack. We just need a lot more people to know that story. Especially people around the ACC and B12.
 
Today 10:16 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Captain Bearcat Offline
All-American in Everything
*

Posts: 6,287
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 392
I Root For: UC
Location: IL & Cincinnati, USA
Post: #116
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 06:35 AM)Ohio Poly Wrote:  
(05-15-2020 10:02 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  NEOMED kind of built that footprint, and I've been on the bandwagon for all of the secondary regional schools to do something similar for years as you know.

None of them will agree to be merged into another. It will only happen if some form of new independent name-neutral umbrella university is formed for them to join. Which would be an instant AAC school.

Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.

Coming back to this... it's simply not possible to do it this way.

There are a lot of synergies among PhD programs. For example, students in business, economics, and statistics all take the same PhD level statistics courses. Students in economics and finance end up taking about 75% of their classes together. I'm sure there's similar synergies among biology and chemistry, or political science and sociology, or history and the language departments, or among the various engineering disciplines.

If you get rid of those synergies, then PhD programs quickly turn into a money pit. There's no extra funding to "focus" on the remaining programs.

It also can lower the quality of the remaining programs, as students lose exposure to cross-disciplinary ideas.
 
Today 04:49 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Captain Bearcat Offline
All-American in Everything
*

Posts: 6,287
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 392
I Root For: UC
Location: IL & Cincinnati, USA
Post: #117
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 04:49 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 06:35 AM)Ohio Poly Wrote:  
(05-15-2020 10:02 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  NEOMED kind of built that footprint, and I've been on the bandwagon for all of the secondary regional schools to do something similar for years as you know.

None of them will agree to be merged into another. It will only happen if some form of new independent name-neutral umbrella university is formed for them to join. Which would be an instant AAC school.

Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.

Coming back to this... it's simply not possible to do it this way.

There are a lot of synergies among PhD programs. For example, students in business, economics, and statistics all take the same PhD level statistics courses. Students in economics and finance end up taking about 75% of their classes together. I'm sure there's similar synergies among biology and chemistry, or political science and sociology, or history and the language departments, or among the various engineering disciplines.

If you get rid of those synergies, then PhD programs quickly turn into a money pit. There's no extra funding to "focus" on the remaining programs.

It also can lower the quality of the remaining programs, as students lose exposure to cross-disciplinary ideas.

To add to this...

It also won't work because Ohio is not a monopoly. The market for students is international.

36% of US PhD graduates had temporary visas. If you take out PhDs in education, it's over 40%. Many of the rest are green card holders or dual citizens.

A student from China or Romania is picking the best school that admits them. If Toledo and Akron both usually have 3 good students and 4 bad students, then shutting down Akron doesn't mean Toledo ends up with 6 good students. More likely, the students who normally would choose Akron will go out of the state. Or even out of the country to a Canadian, German, or Singaporean school - all of which are taught 100% in English at the PhD level.
 
Today 05:22 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Bearcat 1985 Offline
2nd String
*

Posts: 421
Joined: Oct 2016
Reputation: 38
I Root For: Cincinnati
Location:
Post: #118
RE: Athletic Department COVID-19 Hit List: Growing Longer
(Today 05:22 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(Today 04:49 PM)Captain Bearcat Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 09:03 AM)Bearcat 1985 Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 08:37 AM)BearcatMan Wrote:  
(05-16-2020 06:35 AM)Ohio Poly Wrote:  None of them will agree to be merged into another. It will only happen if some form of new independent name-neutral umbrella university is formed for them to join. Which would be an instant AAC school.

Yeah, itnwould have to come from the state, and the efficiency analyses the state had every University overtake a few years back was the first thing that piqued the interest of a lot of those who want regional educational consortiums (like myself). That was the first step...identifying regional redundancies or departments that could be absorbed/migrated to other campuses. Next is going to be whole colleges.

I've gone even further when it comes to Ph.D programs. Establish a set number that Ohio should have: for example, 2 in history and philosophy, 4 in chemistry, 3 in Biology. And then go by the NRC evaluations (take state politics entirely out of it) to determine which ones get the ax. Focus funding on those programs that are nationally relevant or at least have the capability of becoming nationally relevant.

Coming back to this... it's simply not possible to do it this way.

There are a lot of synergies among PhD programs. For example, students in business, economics, and statistics all take the same PhD level statistics courses. Students in economics and finance end up taking about 75% of their classes together. I'm sure there's similar synergies among biology and chemistry, or political science and sociology, or history and the language departments, or among the various engineering disciplines.

If you get rid of those synergies, then PhD programs quickly turn into a money pit. There's no extra funding to "focus" on the remaining programs.

It also can lower the quality of the remaining programs, as students lose exposure to cross-disciplinary ideas.

To add to this...

It also won't work because Ohio is not a monopoly. The market for students is international.

36% of US PhD graduates had temporary visas. If you take out PhDs in education, it's over 40%. Many of the rest are green card holders or dual citizens.

A student from China or Romania is picking the best school that admits them. If Toledo and Akron both usually have 3 good students and 4 bad students, then shutting down Akron doesn't mean Toledo ends up with 6 good students. More likely, the students who normally would choose Akron will go out of the state. Or even out of the country to a Canadian, German, or Singaporean school - all of which are taught 100% in English at the PhD level.

My feeling is that when those programs are shut down at Toledo or Akron, I don't care where those students go. I care where the money that Ohio puts into funding them goes, and that would be to strengthen meaningful, nationally relevant (or at least potentially nationally relevant) programs at OSU and UC. The empire building that occurred at Ohio public universities from the 60s to the 80s is ridiculous and really needs to be rolled back.

OSU has seemed to reach a critical mass of money (both research grants and fundraising) and rankings and national reputation that I don't believe it hurts them the way it did a generation ago. My concern is in how it affects Cincinnati. Here, I absolutely believe that money could be much better spent were a portion of it redirected to Clifton and into Ph.D programs (and an overall comprehensive research university) that have the potential to rise to the next level and could be fundamental in moving UC forward.

In the early and mid 80s, OSU's lobbyists used to ask state legislators a simple question: "If Ohio is going to have a national and internationally respected research university with all the benefits and economic impact that brings to the state, who's it going to be? Miami? Ohio U? Bowling Green?" The question of course was rhetorical, and the answer obvious. UC needs to start taking just such an approach regarding the rest of the system. Who's going to give the state and taxpayers of Ohio a second world class university? Miami? Ohio U? Bowling Green? No, so let's focus on building up strength rather than spreading the peanut butter evenly to every corner of the state.
 
Today 06:57 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 3 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2020 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2020 MyBB Group.