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Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
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ICThawk Offline
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Post: #1
Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
Interesting article on how Covid-19 is causing financial problems for the TV networks. Will it have an affect on rights fees in the future.....and/or possibly affect potential realignment?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/...ronavirus/
03-21-2020 10:01 AM
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quo vadis Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
Thanks for posting, but (a) I hate WAPO links because they have a dreadful paywall and (b) I think we know that all of the Sports world, networks and leagues, are hurting because Sports has basically come to a stop.

We really won't know the impact until CV is over and we can assess the wreckage. So articles like this are like news reports from a hurricane that is still raging and hasn't yet hits its peak.
(This post was last modified: 03-21-2020 10:10 AM by quo vadis.)
03-21-2020 10:09 AM
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Wedge Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.
03-21-2020 01:56 PM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.
03-21-2020 02:05 PM
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Wedge Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.
03-21-2020 02:28 PM
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Big Frog II Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

You are correct. Let's all hope that this ends way before then.
03-21-2020 05:01 PM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

Very true.
03-21-2020 05:15 PM
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Kit-Cat Online
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

Football if its on will probably be on in front of no fans next season. At least its in an age where all the games in FBS at least are televised through some medium.

This is going to be a big structural hit to season ticket sales and donations. A lot of it is from people who made their money in the great boomer economy of the 80's and 90's and who are now around 70. They aren't going to want to sit in crowds with their risk factors.
03-22-2020 10:41 AM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 10:09 AM)quo vadis Wrote:  Thanks for posting, but (a) I hate WAPO links because they have a dreadful paywall and (b) I think we know that all of the Sports world, networks and leagues, are hurting because Sports has basically come to a stop.

We really won't know the impact until CV is over and we can assess the wreckage. So articles like this are like news reports from a hurricane that is still raging and hasn't yet hits its peak.

The only news source I'm even checking is Bloomberg on my mobile for updates on the stimulus package with headlines on the pandemic mixed in. To watch it on the news is unnerving. People are reading a ton a fake news on Facebook and while some people can call BS when they see it others don't know what to believe.
(This post was last modified: 03-22-2020 10:51 AM by Kit-Cat.)
03-22-2020 10:50 AM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

I think institutions that are saying they are suspended or closed until dates like April 30 are being wildly optimistic. In the USA, we're just getting started in terms of the impact.

If I had to bet, I'd say sports is canceled through August at a minimum, and it is more likely than not that neither CFB or the NFL kick off as scheduled.
03-22-2020 11:28 AM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-22-2020 11:28 AM)quo vadis Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

I think institutions that are saying they are suspended or closed until dates like April 30 are being wildly optimistic. In the USA, we're just getting started in terms of the impact.

Yes. Too many hopeful prognostications tossed out there over the past month.

One guy I know changed jobs at the end of February. I said to him not to buy the dip and he's like "I would get in now". Market has gone down another 6,000 points.

I overheard another guy wanting in Chevron because it dropped to 83 dollars a share. I'm like forget that its a bear market in energy right now. Now its sitting at 59 dollars a share.

These closures were initially for 2 weeks in March and been extended through the end of April already have mislead the public in severity.
03-22-2020 11:45 AM
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Post: #12
RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-22-2020 10:41 AM)Kit-Cat Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

Football if its on will probably be on in front of no fans next season. At least its in an age where all the games in FBS at least are televised through some medium.

This is going to be a big structural hit to season ticket sales and donations. A lot of it is from people who made their money in the great boomer economy of the 80's and 90's and who are now around 70. They aren't going to want to sit in crowds with their risk factors.

Was thinking about this yesterday, the crisis could be resolved this week and I think attendance will take a hit for a while. People of all ages are going to be reluctant to be in a crowd of all those people anymore not mention the economic hit individuals will face from lost jobs, layoffs, etc.
03-23-2020 07:08 AM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
The hit to colleges, especially mid-majors and privates, is likely to be sigificant.

I took a look at proposed impact on the school I follow, the University of Denver Here:

https://letsgodu.com/2020/03/23/dus-fina...bstantial/
03-23-2020 03:43 PM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

Doubt NCAA gets paid if they don't hold the tourney. So no credits for this year.
03-24-2020 09:08 PM
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Wedge Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-22-2020 11:28 AM)quo vadis Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:28 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 02:05 PM)johnintx Wrote:  
(03-21-2020 01:56 PM)Wedge Wrote:  tl;dr

Networks will take a short term hit but have the financial reserves to do well in the long run. Top pro leagues will have to give an extension to networks but will also be OK in the long run. Other sports that are more dependent on ticket revenue are more vulnerable.

RSNs are vulnerable because they are losing their highest rated part of NBA and NHL seasons and a big chunk of the MLB season.

Hit to college athletics is uncertain. NCAA won't have to pay back money but will have to give CBS and Turner an extension to compensate. Who knows how or if the NCAA will pay out money to schools for the canceled March Madness. Little impact to athletic departments other than that, unless the 2020 football season is impacted.

Very true re: RSNs.

I'm not sure how the NCAA will pay schools for this tournament since there were no results from which to reward credits, and we'll never know who all the automatic qualifiers would have been. Perhaps they can give an amount to each conference in lieu of their automatic qualifier?

If this lasts into football season, the networks will be in trouble. The NFL is the 800 pound gorilla of TV sports. College football generates a large portion of revenue for athletic departments.

Let's hope we have some sort of normal by August.

If this lasts anywhere near football season, college athletic departments and pro franchises will be in more trouble than TV networks. Ticket sales will be way down. People who have had their income disrupted for months are not going to be in the mood to spend hundreds or thousands for NFL or CFB season tickets, probably not for any other college and pro sport this year, either. Donations to college athletic departments will also be far lower than before, for at least the rest of 2020.

I think institutions that are saying they are suspended or closed until dates like April 30 are being wildly optimistic. In the USA, we're just getting started in terms of the impact.

If I had to bet, I'd say sports is canceled through August at a minimum, and it is more likely than not that neither CFB or the NFL kick off as scheduled.

That is a possibility that people in CFB are looking at, and they are trying to gauge the impact on their finances...

03-26-2020 11:12 AM
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Wedge Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
Also of interest:


(This post was last modified: 03-26-2020 02:07 PM by Wedge.)
03-26-2020 02:02 PM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
If there is no football this year, a whole bunch of leveraged schools are going to be in a pickle especially those still paying for new stadiums or add-ons.
03-26-2020 02:15 PM
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Wedge Offline
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
(03-26-2020 02:15 PM)Big Frog II Wrote:  If there is no football this year, a whole bunch of leveraged schools are going to be in a pickle especially those still paying for new stadiums or add-ons.

Athletic departments will push their revenue shortfall down the chain as much as they can. Most programs would pay coaches and other athletic department personnel a small fraction of their salaries. Programs that have loan payments on facilities would skip some upcoming payments, just like many businesses are going to skip commercial rent payments that are due in the near future.
03-26-2020 02:35 PM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
UMass is refunding 70 Million back to students and their families:

Details:
Quote:BOSTON – UMass President Marty Meehan and the chancellors of the UMass campuses in Amherst, Boston Dartmouth, and Lowell announced today that the university will adjust student room, board and parking fees following the closure of residence halls in response to the coronavirus threat.

In a statement, President Meehan, UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy, UMass Boston Chancellor Katherine Newman, UMass Dartmouth Chancellor Robert Johnson, and UMass Lowell Chancellor Jacquie Moloney said:

“The financial impact of this crisis is causing real hardship for many of our students and their families. We hope that this adjustment of housing, dining and parking fees will help alleviate some of the stress they are enduring. The challenges that lie ahead for the university, its students, faculty and staff will be complex and difficult. We are confident that by staying focused on our mission our students will emerge as strong, innovative, highly skilled contributors to society.”

The Amherst, Dartmouth, and Lowell campuses had more than 20,000 students living in university-owned residence halls. UMass Boston is adjusting dining and parking costs and is working with the private owner of its 1,070-bed on-campus residence halls concerning housing cost adjustments for its students.

The planned adjustments will decrease university revenues by approximately $70 million in the current fiscal year.

Under the plan, the adjustments will be applied to student university accounts. Students will then receive their net balance by direct deposit or check. Campuses are planning to notify students of their individual cost adjustments by April 17.
https://www.massachusetts.edu/news/umass...ng-costs-0
03-27-2020 02:26 PM
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RE: Covid-19 Effect On TV Programming & Financial Consequences
There's a bigger question than if there is football.

Is there school next fall?
03-27-2020 08:10 PM
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