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Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
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arkstfan Away
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Post: #161
RE: Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
(Yesterday 08:49 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(Yesterday 08:39 PM)arkstfan Wrote:  I suspect if they don’t think they can get 8 games in they don’t play.

There are not many programs making more from media rights than attendance, sponsorships and donations (generally tied to seating).

NFL and NBA and probably MLB given choice of no media revenue or no gate revenue will pick no gate. College football playing empty stadiums is much bigger hit as percentage of income.

I don't expect a season at this point. I think COVID19 will peak in June and the aftermath will linger through August and nobody will have the stomach (and rightfully so) for risking a resurgence in the Fall.

I wish you and your wife the best and safe time with close family! But, I don't expect much to change. November may the first time ever I vote absentee.

Arkansas has no reason required absentee voting by mail. I’m likely to do that even though rarely have a line at my polling place.
Yesterday 09:00 PM
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pkptigers07 Offline
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Post: #162
RE: Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
(Yesterday 02:09 PM)Wedge Wrote:  
(Yesterday 01:55 PM)TerryD Wrote:  
(Yesterday 11:15 AM)Hokie Mark Wrote:  
(03-28-2020 06:40 AM)RobtheAggie Wrote:  
(03-27-2020 10:14 PM)johnintx Wrote:  College football in July? In the South? Ouch.
That would be desperation. What about games in Tempe,AZ in July and August?

All of a sudden, half the teams want to be on "Pac-12 After Dark"!

(03-28-2020 06:40 AM)RobtheAggie Wrote:  If they only play a conference schedule, what does ND, Army, BYU, Liberty, UMass, UConn and NMSU do?

I'm sure if Notre Dame petitioned the ACC to go all-in for football immediately that the conference would be willing to re-do the schedule for them, even at this late date.

I am doubtful about a 2020 college football season.

It will be difficult.

They can talk about playing college football in empty stadiums, but many schools would conclude that without the home game revenue -- it can be several million a game for the wealthiest programs -- there's not enough upside to outweigh the downsides.

Even in empty stadiums and arenas, athletes who are not showing symptoms can spread the virus to other athletes and coaches, as Rudy Gobert and others have done.

And any sport or league that plays in full stadiums before there's a vaccine for this virus is risking a repeat of this:

Game Zero: Spread of virus linked to UEFA Champions League match between Atalanta and Valencia

Quote:ROME (AP) — It was the biggest soccer game in Atalanta’s history and a third of Bergamo’s population made the short trip to Milan’s famed San Siro Stadium.

Nearly 2,500 fans of visiting Spanish club Valencia also traveled to that Champions League match.

More than a month later, experts are pointing to the Feb. 19 game as one of the biggest reasons why Bergamo has become one of the epicenters of the coronavirus pandemic — a “biological bomb” was the way one respiratory specialist put it — and why 35% of Valencia’s team became infected.

The match, which local media have dubbed “Game Zero,” was held two days before the first case of locally transmitted COVID-19 was confirmed in Italy.

Empty stadiums will be huge drains in schools outside the P5. I suspect many schools will still be offering online only in the fall which will make sports a huge liability. Hard to charge athletic fees with tuition when most schools don’t normally include those for online students. Hard to make a budget work without ticket revenue and student fees.

The travel aspect will become very problematic and a liability. I suspect some areas will be doing much better than others by September. Bringing football players from all over the country to empty campuses and then traveling them to other cities sounds like a great way to light the fire of a second wave in areas that have otherwise recovered.
Yesterday 10:44 PM
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ken d Online
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Post: #163
RE: Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
If the 2020 football season were to be canceled, how much of P5 schools' athletic spending would actually be eliminated? Travel expenses, certainly. Some recruiting expenses, but not all. Game day costs for home games. Some field maintenance costs. Coaches' bonuses, probably.

What won't be curtailed? Coaches salaries and scholarship costs. Sports information staff salaries, probably.

A big question mark for me has to do with the few schools at the very top of the revenue pyramid. If you are a school like Texas, with annual revenues in the neighborhood of $200 million, how many people does your athletics department employ? Are some of them employed just because UT has to spend the money somewhere? If there were no revenues generated primarily from football, including some that aren't attributed to the football program for public reporting purposes, how many of those employees would be furloughed?

How much would uncertainty about the restart of basketball at some point in the next school year play into these tough decisions?
Today 09:15 AM
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JRsec Offline
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Post: #164
RE: Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
(Today 09:15 AM)ken d Wrote:  If the 2020 football season were to be canceled, how much of P5 schools' athletic spending would actually be eliminated? Travel expenses, certainly. Some recruiting expenses, but not all. Game day costs for home games. Some field maintenance costs. Coaches' bonuses, probably.

What won't be curtailed? Coaches salaries and scholarship costs. Sports information staff salaries, probably.

A big question mark for me has to do with the few schools at the very top of the revenue pyramid. If you are a school like Texas, with annual revenues in the neighborhood of $200 million, how many people does your athletics department employ? Are some of them employed just because UT has to spend the money somewhere? If there were no revenues generated primarily from football, including some that aren't attributed to the football program for public reporting purposes, how many of those employees would be furloughed?

How much would uncertainty about the restart of basketball at some point in the next school year play into these tough decisions?

I wouldn't get too wound around the chord on this one. States and Universities will probably take the hit for a year. But I don't see a good reason to worry past that. It may become standard procedure for all players in the future for all travel sports to merely take Hydroxychloroquine and Zinc. As we understand the process now of how it is working. When taken in concert the two together destroy the virus's ability to replicate leaving the bodies immune system to do its work without being overwhelmed. So I see no reason why by next year sports should still remain cancelled.

The greater issue is going to be the social memory of the disease and the ease with which it spread. When malaria was a huge issue for Europeans traveling abroad a culture grew up around the taking of Quinine. The Gin and tonic grew out of this common cultural experience.

But getting people back into desiring to return to malaria prone regions never quite did regain momentum. Returning to tailgating and crowded venues probably won't be as appealing to those whose lives have been negatively impacted by this experience, particularly those who lost loved ones because of it.

It will make many familiar with taking classes online and make them more likely to find other benefits in it.

Our campuses will flourish with online enrollment but the local realtors may not. Room & board costs mom and dad more than tuition in many cases. Future college students may opt to keep their home time high school job and sweetheart and get their degree remotely. They may travel to campuses for some testing and for lab requirements, but the main campuses will likely gravitate toward graduate work, which face it has far less partying and a lot more serious work than undergraduate. And because of that less health risk overall.

I think what we will see is a paradigm shift in how the young look at the college experience. If anything this may facilitate the rapidity in movement to smaller stadium capacity with more private rooms for viewing games than retention of row seating. TV may more quickly become the favorite way to experience gameday. Small social gatherings at homes with HD and surround sound will replace both the need for tickets and the tailgate. It will still be a social activity just not a mass social activity. Team clothing etc will remain popular and bookstores as we've known them will require far less brick and mortar space and will ship to fill orders like Amazon. Shopping online will be improved and become more familiar and grocery stores may finally realize that the way of the future is to return to 1920's when they took orders in the morning, filled them, and the customers picked them up on the way home, or they were delivered.

In any event some industries will be born and others will die as a result of this experience, but the games will go on if for no other reason than TV otherwise is a fearmongering, unhinged, immoral, Harpy in the den of our homes.
Today 09:39 AM
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Post: #165
RE: Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
(Today 09:39 AM)JRsec Wrote:  
(Today 09:15 AM)ken d Wrote:  If the 2020 football season were to be canceled, how much of P5 schools' athletic spending would actually be eliminated? Travel expenses, certainly. Some recruiting expenses, but not all. Game day costs for home games. Some field maintenance costs. Coaches' bonuses, probably.

What won't be curtailed? Coaches salaries and scholarship costs. Sports information staff salaries, probably.

A big question mark for me has to do with the few schools at the very top of the revenue pyramid. If you are a school like Texas, with annual revenues in the neighborhood of $200 million, how many people does your athletics department employ? Are some of them employed just because UT has to spend the money somewhere? If there were no revenues generated primarily from football, including some that aren't attributed to the football program for public reporting purposes, how many of those employees would be furloughed?

How much would uncertainty about the restart of basketball at some point in the next school year play into these tough decisions?

I wouldn't get too wound around the chord on this one. States and Universities will probably take the hit for a year. But I don't see a good reason to worry past that. It may become standard procedure for all players in the future for all travel sports to merely take Hydroxychloroquine and Zinc. As we understand the process now of how it is working. When taken in concert the two together destroy the virus's ability to replicate leaving the bodies immune system to do its work without being overwhelmed. So I see no reason why by next year sports should still remain cancelled.

The greater issue is going to be the social memory of the disease and the ease with which it spread. When malaria was a huge issue for Europeans traveling abroad a culture grew up around the taking of Quinine. The Gin and tonic grew out of this common cultural experience.

But getting people back into desiring to return to malaria prone regions never quite did regain momentum. Returning to tailgating and crowded venues probably won't be as appealing to those whose lives have been negatively impacted by this experience, particularly those who lost loved ones because of it.

It will make many familiar with taking classes online and make them more likely to find other benefits in it.

Our campuses will flourish with online enrollment but the local realtors may not. Room & board costs mom and dad more than tuition in many cases. Future college students may opt to keep their home time high school job and sweetheart and get their degree remotely. They may travel to campuses for some testing and for lab requirements, but the main campuses will likely gravitate toward graduate work, which face it has far less partying and a lot more serious work than undergraduate. And because of that less health risk overall.

I think what we will see is a paradigm shift in how the young look at the college experience. If anything this may facilitate the rapidity in movement to smaller stadium capacity with more private rooms for viewing games than retention of row seating. TV may more quickly become the favorite way to experience gameday. Small social gatherings at homes with HD and surround sound will replace both the need for tickets and the tailgate. It will still be a social activity just not a mass social activity. Team clothing etc will remain popular and bookstores as we've known them will require far less brick and mortar space and will ship to fill orders like Amazon. Shopping online will be improved and become more familiar and grocery stores may finally realize that the way of the future is to return to 1920's when they took orders in the morning, filled them, and the customers picked them up on the way home, or they were delivered.

In any event some industries will be born and others will die as a result of this experience, but the games will go on if for no other reason than TV otherwise is a fearmongering, unhinged, immoral, Harpy in the den of our homes.

Malaria perhaps more than anything else gave us slavery. It was brought from Africa where there was some immunity, but it made the fertile, marshy part of the south very unhealthy for Europeans.
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Post: #166
RE: Could We Have A Year Without College Football?
(Today 09:39 AM)JRsec Wrote:  In any event some industries will be born and others will die as a result of this experience, but the games will go on if for no other reason than TV otherwise is a fearmongering, unhinged, immoral, Harpy in the den of our homes.


Can I call in the spirit of Sam Kinison to redeliver this paragraph? It needs lots more vitriol packaged within humor.
Today 12:09 PM
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