Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
Author Message
The Cutter of Bish Offline
All American
*

Posts: 3,903
Joined: Mar 2013
Reputation: 104
I Root For: the little guy
Location:
Post: #201
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
And this is why Villanova is sitting there saying they’re glad this isn’t their problem, because it would have been with the jump.

UConn is precisely the point about what programs can or should do. UConn is a basketball school. But because it won’t commit the same to football coaches, out comes the shame culture.

For everything basketball did for these guys, and what football didn’t, what, UConn MUST outspend in football when basketball put it on the map? Basketball may get these guys back to the Big East...football hasn’t stamped an ACC, B1G, or Big XII ticket.

Yeah, Villanova made the right decision by a long country mile.
(This post was last modified: 02-10-2019 09:08 PM by The Cutter of Bish.)
02-10-2019 09:08 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
DavidSt Offline
Hall of Famer
*

Posts: 11,938
Joined: Dec 2013
Reputation: 150
I Root For: ATU, P7
Location:
Post: #202
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-10-2019 10:37 AM)esayem Wrote:  
(02-09-2019 10:43 PM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-09-2019 01:11 PM)esayem Wrote:  
(02-09-2019 07:20 AM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-09-2019 01:53 AM)P5PACSEC Wrote:  I like it.

So Tulane came up for a vote and lost. So did Rice, SMU, and Air Force, among others (according to you - all we really know is that those schools applied for consideration). How is that an argument that they were wanted? Sounds like the opposite.

Academics matter to presidents only in a negative sense. They are an excuse to keep a school out of your conference, not a reason to invite them in. The question of academics doesn't even come up unless a conference's media partner has already agreed to increase their payout sufficiently to keep existing members at least whole or pretty close to it.

The list of G5 schools that would make it far enough to even have a vote taken by a P5 conference is very short.

You answered your own question, they came up for a VOTE. That is the final stage, which means they made it past preliminary meetings and were vouched for by certain presidents in the room. It’s different than a school declaring interest and it falling on deaf ears, think about FSU, Memphis, and Southern Miss trying for years to get in the SEC. Or Tulsa’s coach talking about how they belong in the Big 8 circa mid-80’s.

Being invited to apply for an actual, official vote on-record means the school was at the FINAL step.

If you read my post, what I said was that you said they came up for a vote. I have no way of knowing that any of them actually did. Usually, a vote isn't taken unless you think they will be voted in. I doubt any of those schools were put to a vote - all they did was express interest in what turned out to be little more than a publicity show.

You may be correct about the Big XII not voting on individual schools, but we do know which schools were on the table. Others were told bugger off, while those 11 were invited to present. To me that definitely shows interest by the Big XII. If they tell other schools don’t bother, and then invite 11 others still in consideration. Of course they’re interested!

https://www.tulsaworld.com/news/swc-expa...a8d04.html

As far as Tulane goes, this article mentions a vote being pushed back, which goes along with what Artstfan said. It also mentions a visit to Tulane’s campus occurred. Why waste time on that if there wasn’t interest?

Tulsa didn’t get a site visit. Cincinnati, Louisville, and Memphis didn’t get site visits, but were urged as a possible expansion plan by the SWC’s commish. Tulane got a site visit and a vote!

UConn was 1 of the 11 finalists for the Big 12.

ESPN=Excited Boise State and BYU on the Big 12 expansion list.
ESPN=not excited when BYU and Boise State were eliminated from expansion.

ESPN knows which colleges do have some value that could bring to these big conferences by the ratings on tv. Rice, Tulane and Tulsa all have the lowest ratings for football. UConn did have better ratings, but compare the past 10 years, they do not get the ratings like BYU and Boise State.

When ESPN covered the WAC football? The top teams in ratings were Boise State, Fresno State, Hawaii, UNR and La. Tech. MWC still pretty much the same with San Diego State, Air Force, New Mexico, Boise State, UNR and Fresno State. Usually the winning teams get the ratings. With UConn losing in football and men's basketball? They have been slipping backwards after losing their rivals.
02-11-2019 04:55 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Huskypride Offline
New Kid on the Block
*

Posts: 2,562
Joined: Mar 2017
Reputation: 154
I Root For: Competitive FB
Location: Worcester
Post: #203
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
man...
02-14-2019 11:19 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
DawgNBama Offline
NCR Ranger
*

Posts: 3,020
Joined: Sep 2002
Reputation: 80
I Root For: p-natal vitamin
Location: prenatal vitamins
Post: #204
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
Sounds like UConn needs to hire a USM AD/associate AD. USM knows how to get the most bang for its buck.
02-14-2019 11:43 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Attackcoog Online
Moderator
*

Posts: 27,957
Joined: Oct 2011
Reputation: 1193
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #205
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 11:43 AM)DawgNBama Wrote:  Sounds like UConn needs to hire a USM AD/associate AD. USM knows how to get the most bang for its buck.

I wonder how much hockey is contributing to the UConn spending problem. Southern schools dont play hockey and I suspect a lot of G5 schools dont sponsor the sport.
(This post was last modified: 02-14-2019 12:42 PM by Attackcoog.)
02-14-2019 12:42 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Steve1981 Offline
All American
*

Posts: 2,927
Joined: Nov 2010
Reputation: 146
I Root For: UMass
Location: North Quabbin Region
Post: #206
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-10-2019 09:26 AM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  https://www.ctpost.com/sports/jeffjacobs...602673.php

It is an embarrassing look for a program that has become an embarrassment for the school and the state. After an 1-11 season with the only victory over an FCS school, after a season where UConn made a near foolproof argument for being the worst defensive team in NCAA history, after securing its eighth successive losing record, after struggling mightily to get 10,000 actual fannies in the seats, yes, embarrassment seems the appropriate word.

New school president Thomas C. Katsouleas said he is committed to football and the AAC. Fine. I would have said the same predictable thing. Katsouleas also has to realize it means he is committed to a sport that lost upward of $9 million last year and needs more financial support to pay coaches, improve facilities, to be a real player — not less. Without the great treasure chest currently enjoyed by the Power 5 conferences, if his commitment is anything more than provisional beyond the next round of television contracts starting in 2023, well, he ought to have his head examined. These are scary financial times and vigilance over the next handful of years is vital.

Pretty bleak outlook.
Thought UConn had a new 40k stadium built near Hartford. What facilities improvements are there? Assume they have some sort of IPF, is the assumption correct?

Regarding hockey, does very well. We had a number of sellouts with 8,500 fans this season at UMass.
[Image: DtV3KaFXoAARPtr.jpg]
(This post was last modified: 02-15-2019 01:21 PM by Steve1981.)
02-14-2019 12:51 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
GoldenWarrior11 Offline
1st String
*

Posts: 2,387
Joined: Jul 2015
Reputation: 204
I Root For: Marquette, BE
Location: Chicago
Post: #207
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.
02-14-2019 01:29 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Attackcoog Online
Moderator
*

Posts: 27,957
Joined: Oct 2011
Reputation: 1193
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #208
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

You have a point. That said---I actually think the AAC has some solid peer institutions for UConn. For instance---all are FBS. All but one are top 200 USNWR universities. Most are high research universities per Carnegie. Tulane, Tulsa, Temple, SMU, are certainly peer academic institutions and most of the others are reasonably in the ball park of academic performance. The real problem for UConn is not so much that it lacks "peer" institutions in the conference---its that it had to expand the geography of the conference radically to find reasonably similar "peer" schools. Its hard for the UConn fans to work up much excitement playing schools spread all over hell's half acre with which they have limited or no history with.
02-14-2019 02:07 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
GoldenWarrior11 Offline
1st String
*

Posts: 2,387
Joined: Jul 2015
Reputation: 204
I Root For: Marquette, BE
Location: Chicago
Post: #209
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 02:07 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

You have a point. That said---I actually think the AAC has some solid peer institutions for UConn. For instance---all are FBS. All but one are top 200 USNWR universities. Most are high research universities per Carnegie. Tulane, Tulsa, Temple, SMU, are certainly peer academic institutions and most of the others are reasonably in the ball park of academic performance. The real problem for UConn is not so much that it lacks "peer" institutions in the conference---its that it had to expand the geography of the conference radically to find reasonably similar "peer" schools. Its hard for the UConn fans to work up much excitement playing schools spread all over hell's half acre with which they have limited or no history with.

A little push back:

Tulane - for sure, high-academic institution. Top-50 in the country. However, the academic associations that Tulane belongs to - AAU, ORAU, URA, NAICU and SURA - do not share any association with UConn. I imagine that UConn views its association with Tulane through the AAC as a significant academic positive, so I don't think there is a huge divide there (despite significant distance and athletic performance).

For the AAC, the only top-100 academic institution (other than UConn and Tulane) is SMU. Every other school falls outside that grouping. For a few (Wichita State, Memphis, East Carolina), they fall outside the top-200. For reference, West Virginia was also outside the top-200 in USNWR, but I'm guessing (athletically) that association is easier due to geography and proximity. Many of the schools appear between #100 and #175 (Temple, Tulsa, Cincinnati, USF, UCF, Houston).

Of the academic affiliations that UConn belong to (APLU, CUMU and U21), only Houston and Temple are shared group members in those groups. The breakup from the old Big East saw the school lose a number high-academic peers athletically in Syracuse, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Notre Dame and Georgetown. Ironically enough, I did not know that UConn and Marquette share an academic association with CUMU - go figure.
02-14-2019 02:45 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
quo vadis Offline
Legend
*

Posts: 29,795
Joined: Aug 2008
Reputation: 708
I Root For: USF/Georgetown
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Post: #210
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 02:07 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  You have a point. That said---I actually think the AAC has some solid peer institutions for UConn. For instance---all are FBS. All but one are top 200 USNWR universities. Most are high research universities per Carnegie.


Here's a link to a document from a UConn website (Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness) that lists UConn's "peers and aspirants":

Peers:

Indiana
Michigan State
Purdue
Delaware
Georgia
Kansas
Kentucky
Utah

Aspirants:

Ohio State
Penn State
UC - Davis
Florida
Illinois
Maryland
Texas
Wisconsin


What stands out to me is that (a) all the schools are public schools, (b) just about all are flagships, © a full 8 of the 16 schools on the combined lists are from the B1G. None are from the ACC or AAC/Big East. Three are from the SEC, two from the Big 12.

The rubber: Seems like UConn sees itself and wants to see itself as an elite public flagship, and that's who it wants to affiliate with. That says B1G more than anything else. Doesn't say AAC at all, or Big East.

https://oire.uconn.edu/wp-content/upload...irants.pdf
(This post was last modified: 02-14-2019 02:52 PM by quo vadis.)
02-14-2019 02:49 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
CarlSmithCenter Offline
Bench Warmer
*

Posts: 127
Joined: Jun 2014
Reputation: 11
I Root For: Ball So Hard U
Location:
Post: #211
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
Peers and Aspirants are the new Leaders and Legends.
02-15-2019 01:03 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
XLance Online
Heisman
*

Posts: 8,209
Joined: Mar 2008
Reputation: 223
I Root For: Carolina
Location:
Post: #212
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 12:42 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 11:43 AM)DawgNBama Wrote:  Sounds like UConn needs to hire a USM AD/associate AD. USM knows how to get the most bang for its buck.

I wonder how much hockey is contributing to the UConn spending problem. Southern schools dont play hockey and I suspect a lot of G5 schools dont sponsor the sport.

https://www.thepncarena.com/events/detai...e-hockey-1[Image: BackyardBrawl_PNCWeb_Large-69df801d22.jpg]
02-15-2019 08:06 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ken d Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 9,925
Joined: Dec 2013
Reputation: 441
I Root For: college sports
Location: Raleigh
Post: #213
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

In short, take away football and UConn reverts to what it was before they got a golden ticket to the Big East. Of course, when they first got that ticket, it appeared more bronze than gold. But it quickly grew into the premier basketball conference in the country.

Now, unfortunately, they are stuck in a terrible spot. Even if the next AAC contract comes in at the top of the ranges that have been predicted, they still are faced with huge annual deficits and no way to fix them. They don't really fit anywhere that they want to be. That must be depressing for them.
02-15-2019 08:20 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
esayem Offline
Hark The Sound!
*

Posts: 4,918
Joined: Feb 2007
Reputation: 145
I Root For: The Heels
Location: Tobacco Road
Post: #214
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
When UConn played Big East football they had guaranteed games with regional opponents like Syracuse and Rutgers. Looking at their future OOC schedules, I see UMass, Maine, Holy Cross, and Boston College. Now that they're in a league that encompasses half the nation's land mass, they are doing right by scheduling regionally outside of the conference.

I am seeing this more and more with schools that play the majority of their conference games against teams outside of their footprint. Rather than playing the majority of games against regional teams and highlighting the OOC with games of national interest, it is the opposite, except many of the conference games have no real fan interest.
02-15-2019 11:52 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Attackcoog Online
Moderator
*

Posts: 27,957
Joined: Oct 2011
Reputation: 1193
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #215
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-15-2019 08:20 AM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

In short, take away football and UConn reverts to what it was before they got a golden ticket to the Big East. Of course, when they first got that ticket, it appeared more bronze than gold. But it quickly grew into the premier basketball conference in the country.

Now, unfortunately, they are stuck in a terrible spot. Even if the next AAC contract comes in at the top of the ranges that have been predicted, they still are faced with huge annual deficits and no way to fix them. They don't really fit anywhere that they want to be. That must be depressing for them.

Well---yeah. The money is different. That said, how is it that many G5's are able to be very competitive spending far less than 81 million. UConn probably needs to evaluate how its spending. Cut some sports and budget smarter. As Ive said before, no reason they cant be very competitive spending 60 million. Between less spending and turning the revenue sports around (thus improving ticket sales)--the UConn deficit will fall to the level of most G5's deal with. In fact, UConn could even potentially flirt with being revenue neutral if they execute the strategy really effectively.
02-15-2019 01:02 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Attackcoog Online
Moderator
*

Posts: 27,957
Joined: Oct 2011
Reputation: 1193
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #216
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-14-2019 02:45 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 02:07 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

You have a point. That said---I actually think the AAC has some solid peer institutions for UConn. For instance---all are FBS. All but one are top 200 USNWR universities. Most are high research universities per Carnegie. Tulane, Tulsa, Temple, SMU, are certainly peer academic institutions and most of the others are reasonably in the ball park of academic performance. The real problem for UConn is not so much that it lacks "peer" institutions in the conference---its that it had to expand the geography of the conference radically to find reasonably similar "peer" schools. Its hard for the UConn fans to work up much excitement playing schools spread all over hell's half acre with which they have limited or no history with.

A little push back:

Tulane - for sure, high-academic institution. Top-50 in the country. However, the academic associations that Tulane belongs to - AAU, ORAU, URA, NAICU and SURA - do not share any association with UConn. I imagine that UConn views its association with Tulane through the AAC as a significant academic positive, so I don't think there is a huge divide there (despite significant distance and athletic performance).

For the AAC, the only top-100 academic institution (other than UConn and Tulane) is SMU. Every other school falls outside that grouping. For a few (Wichita State, Memphis, East Carolina), they fall outside the top-200. For reference, West Virginia was also outside the top-200 in USNWR, but I'm guessing (athletically) that association is easier due to geography and proximity. Many of the schools appear between #100 and #175 (Temple, Tulsa, Cincinnati, USF, UCF, Houston).

Of the academic affiliations that UConn belong to (APLU, CUMU and U21), only Houston and Temple are shared group members in those groups. The breakup from the old Big East saw the school lose a number high-academic peers athletically in Syracuse, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, Notre Dame and Georgetown. Ironically enough, I did not know that UConn and Marquette share an academic association with CUMU - go figure.

I must have looked at older data. ECU used to be in the top 200. Memphis was the only all-sports member outside of the USNWR top 200. I would still say the schools of the AAC are largely reasonably similar academic peers. Half the AAC conference's all sports members are listed among the "Highest Research Activity" ranking by Carnegie. So, as G5's go---its a pretty good match in terms of research for UConn.
02-15-2019 01:12 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
quo vadis Offline
Legend
*

Posts: 29,795
Joined: Aug 2008
Reputation: 708
I Root For: USF/Georgetown
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Post: #217
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-15-2019 01:02 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-15-2019 08:20 AM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

In short, take away football and UConn reverts to what it was before they got a golden ticket to the Big East. Of course, when they first got that ticket, it appeared more bronze than gold. But it quickly grew into the premier basketball conference in the country.

Now, unfortunately, they are stuck in a terrible spot. Even if the next AAC contract comes in at the top of the ranges that have been predicted, they still are faced with huge annual deficits and no way to fix them. They don't really fit anywhere that they want to be. That must be depressing for them.

Well---yeah. The money is different. That said, how is it that many G5's are able to be very competitive spending far less than 81 million. UConn probably needs to evaluate how its spending. Cut some sports and budget smarter. As Ive said before, no reason they cant be very competitive spending 60 million. Between less spending and turning the revenue sports around (thus improving ticket sales)--the UConn deficit will fall to the level of most G5's deal with. In fact, UConn could even potentially flirt with being revenue neutral if they execute the strategy really effectively.

That's almost surely true, but I don't think winning big at the G5 level is UConn's priority, being viewed by the P5 as "P5 ready" is. UConn is the one G5 school with a solidly P5-level athletic budget, and I bet they view that as an advantage should a P5 spot open up.

In contrast, a big athletic cut from $80m to $60m and the elimination of some sports would look bad, it would likely be interpreted by P5 as UConn retreating to a lesser level of athletic involvement. Sure, they'd rather do both - win and be viewed as having P5 ready infrastructure - but if the choice is between the two I bet they prefer the latter.

As I think we've all acknowledged, UConn is in a real pickle. They have spent hand over fist to position themselves budget-wise to get a P5 call-up, and that hasn't materialized.
(This post was last modified: 02-15-2019 01:46 PM by quo vadis.)
02-15-2019 01:45 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
GoldenWarrior11 Offline
1st String
*

Posts: 2,387
Joined: Jul 2015
Reputation: 204
I Root For: Marquette, BE
Location: Chicago
Post: #218
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-15-2019 01:02 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-15-2019 08:20 AM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

In short, take away football and UConn reverts to what it was before they got a golden ticket to the Big East. Of course, when they first got that ticket, it appeared more bronze than gold. But it quickly grew into the premier basketball conference in the country.

Now, unfortunately, they are stuck in a terrible spot. Even if the next AAC contract comes in at the top of the ranges that have been predicted, they still are faced with huge annual deficits and no way to fix them. They don't really fit anywhere that they want to be. That must be depressing for them.

Well---yeah. The money is different. That said, how is it that many G5's are able to be very competitive spending far less than 81 million. UConn probably needs to evaluate how its spending. Cut some sports and budget smarter. As Ive said before, no reason they cant be very competitive spending 60 million. Between less spending and turning the revenue sports around (thus improving ticket sales)--the UConn deficit will fall to the level of most G5's deal with. In fact, UConn could even potentially flirt with being revenue neutral if they execute the strategy really effectively.

To this point, I would once again highlight how unique UConn's situation is with regards to other institutions and athletic programs.

UConn does not own its football stadium (the state of Connecticut does). It does not own its secondary basketball and primary hockey facility (the city of Hartford does). It pays rent to utilize both facilities, and - to my knowledge - does not get to keep concessions and/or parking revenue from home events. In essence, the state university pays rental fees and relinquishes potential revenue back to the state. I do not know of any other state flagship university that has an arrangement similar to this. Thus, when talking about the substantial deficit that the athletic department faces, the school is already at a disadvantage when it comes to making money and retaining revenue.

Cutting sports may ultimately lead to a reduction in the budget deficit, but the larger problem doesn't really get solved in that regard because those cut sports are not going to be a "found revenue source" that can be suddenly invested into the football program.
02-15-2019 02:23 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ken d Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 9,925
Joined: Dec 2013
Reputation: 441
I Root For: college sports
Location: Raleigh
Post: #219
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-15-2019 01:45 PM)quo vadis Wrote:  
(02-15-2019 01:02 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-15-2019 08:20 AM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

In short, take away football and UConn reverts to what it was before they got a golden ticket to the Big East. Of course, when they first got that ticket, it appeared more bronze than gold. But it quickly grew into the premier basketball conference in the country.

Now, unfortunately, they are stuck in a terrible spot. Even if the next AAC contract comes in at the top of the ranges that have been predicted, they still are faced with huge annual deficits and no way to fix them. They don't really fit anywhere that they want to be. That must be depressing for them.

Well---yeah. The money is different. That said, how is it that many G5's are able to be very competitive spending far less than 81 million. UConn probably needs to evaluate how its spending. Cut some sports and budget smarter. As Ive said before, no reason they cant be very competitive spending 60 million. Between less spending and turning the revenue sports around (thus improving ticket sales)--the UConn deficit will fall to the level of most G5's deal with. In fact, UConn could even potentially flirt with being revenue neutral if they execute the strategy really effectively.

That's almost surely true, but I don't think winning big at the G5 level is UConn's priority, being viewed by the P5 as "P5 ready" is. UConn is the one G5 school with a solidly P5-level athletic budget, and I bet they view that as an advantage should a P5 spot open up.

In contrast, a big athletic cut from $80m to $60m and the elimination of some sports would look bad, it would likely be interpreted by P5 as UConn retreating to a lesser level of athletic involvement. Sure, they'd rather do both - win and be viewed as having P5 ready infrastructure - but if the choice is between the two I bet they prefer the latter.

As I think we've all acknowledged, UConn is in a real pickle. They have spent hand over fist to position themselves budget-wise to get a P5 call-up, and that hasn't materialized.

The problem, though, for UConn is that demonstrating that you can't win consistently against G5 competition with a P5 budget shows that you aren't "P5 ready" (whatever that is). At some point, UConn needs to face reality. They don't have anything of value that any P5 conference doesn't already have enough of. If they are buying time until a spot opens up for them, how long are they prepared to wait for a spot that likely will never come?

At some point, don't you start to look pathetic to those schools you hope will consider you a peer?
02-15-2019 02:47 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Attackcoog Online
Moderator
*

Posts: 27,957
Joined: Oct 2011
Reputation: 1193
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #220
RE: UConn loses $40 million in 2018 trying to keep up
(02-15-2019 02:23 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  
(02-15-2019 01:02 PM)Attackcoog Wrote:  
(02-15-2019 08:20 AM)ken d Wrote:  
(02-14-2019 01:29 PM)GoldenWarrior11 Wrote:  I think one of the biggest struggles that UConn currently faces is identifying and associating itself with institutional peers, which highlights how unique UConn is in relation to the other schools in the Northeast.

For example, if you look at the school - academically and institutionally - they are a top public school in the Northeast. However, the Northeast is surrounded by high-academic, private, universities from the Ivy League, MIT, Tufts, Brandeis, etc. For similar athletic programs, Rutgers, Syracuse and Boston College (all P5 members) each have higher academic rankings, and Syracuse and BC are both private. Each of those programs invested and promoted football for decades before UConn. UConn is a top-75 national university without an AAU accreditation in a low-populous state. If you were to place UConn in the B1G, they would be dead-last in overall endowment, and second-to-last in enrollment (ahead of only Northwestern). If you pivot towards the ACC, UConn's enrollment matches favorably towards the other members, but only due to the abundance of smaller private schools within the conference (Notre Dame, Boston College, Duke, Wake Forest and Miami); their endowment would also be at the bottom of the conference. It goes without saying that being in the AAC, UConn is isolated in the regard that it is the lone public flagship institution, and one of two Northeast schools, in a conference that is southern-based with non-land grant institutions and metropolitan universities. In the event of a possible Big 12/AAC merger, again, it brings the school nothing close to that desired destination of aligning with institutional and geographic peers.

Taking a step back, both Vermont and Delaware have higher endowments than UConn, and are also top-100 national universities, but both schools have lower student enrollments. Maine and Rhode Island are both behind all three schools in terms of national academic rankings, enrollment and endowments. Obviously, none of those institutions have the same athletic program that UConn has, with none having FBS athletic departments.

It goes without saying that FBS football is a major factor in what separates UConn from the other public flagships in the Northeast. Take football away from UConn, and it suddenly is a lot closer to Vermont, Delaware, Maine and Rhode Island than it is to Syracuse, Rutgers, Boston College and Pittsburgh. However, athletics aside, UConn is already a lot different than those P5-area institutions, so it really puts UConn in a weird spot between those two groups. To emphasize, UConn moving to the Big East does nothing to bring the school closer to their perceived institutional peers; but I think that gap is significantly wider than most are willing to admit. Elevating football in the late 90's was an attempt to become more like latter institutions and separate itself from those perceived lower programs. Today, they appear very much caught between a rock and a hard place.

In short, take away football and UConn reverts to what it was before they got a golden ticket to the Big East. Of course, when they first got that ticket, it appeared more bronze than gold. But it quickly grew into the premier basketball conference in the country.

Now, unfortunately, they are stuck in a terrible spot. Even if the next AAC contract comes in at the top of the ranges that have been predicted, they still are faced with huge annual deficits and no way to fix them. They don't really fit anywhere that they want to be. That must be depressing for them.

Well---yeah. The money is different. That said, how is it that many G5's are able to be very competitive spending far less than 81 million. UConn probably needs to evaluate how its spending. Cut some sports and budget smarter. As Ive said before, no reason they cant be very competitive spending 60 million. Between less spending and turning the revenue sports around (thus improving ticket sales)--the UConn deficit will fall to the level of most G5's deal with. In fact, UConn could even potentially flirt with being revenue neutral if they execute the strategy really effectively.

To this point, I would once again highlight how unique UConn's situation is with regards to other institutions and athletic programs.

UConn does not own its football stadium (the state of Connecticut does). It does not own its secondary basketball and primary hockey facility (the city of Hartford does). It pays rent to utilize both facilities, and - to my knowledge - does not get to keep concessions and/or parking revenue from home events. In essence, the state university pays rental fees and relinquishes potential revenue back to the state. I do not know of any other state flagship university that has an arrangement similar to this. Thus, when talking about the substantial deficit that the athletic department faces, the school is already at a disadvantage when it comes to making money and retaining revenue.

Cutting sports may ultimately lead to a reduction in the budget deficit, but the larger problem doesn't really get solved in that regard because those cut sports are not going to be a "found revenue source" that can be suddenly invested into the football program.

To me the XL Center is a good example of an expense to cut. UConn has an arena in Storrs. Its doesnt NEED to play games in Hartford. It may want to---but thats an unneeded expense. It may need XL for hockey---but it doesnt need to use the XL Center for basketball.
(This post was last modified: 02-15-2019 03:01 PM by Attackcoog.)
02-15-2019 03:00 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2019 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2019 MyBB Group.