Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
Author Message
Kaplony Offline
Palmetto State Deplorable
*

Posts: 19,521
Joined: Apr 2013
Reputation: 1742
I Root For: Newberry
Location: SC
Post: #1
State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-mexic...story.html

Quote:This week the United States told its citizens not to visit five violence-ridden Mexican states, placing them on the same warning level given to war-torn Somalia, Afghanistan and Syria.


The State Department’s newest travel advisory for Mexico included “do not travel” warnings for the northeastern border state of Tamaulipas and the Pacific coast states of Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan and Sinaloa. The advisory, released Wednesday, gave the states its highest-risk Category 4 warning, the same classification the U.S. has given conflict-racked nations such as Libya and Yemen.

Quote:Colima


Known for: The fourth smallest state in Mexico, Colima has the smallest population, with 650,000 residents. The city of Manzanillo, on the Pacific coast, boasts one of Mexico’s busiest ports, while the city’s beaches have long drawn both domestic tourists and international cruise ships.


Homicide rate: 83 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: Rival cartels have been battling for control of Manzanilla’s port, a primary point of entry for drugs from South and Central America as well as for precursor chemicals coming from Asia that are used to manufacture synthetic drugs. “Violent crime and gang activity are widespread,” the U.S. warned in its travel advisory. “Do not travel.”

Quote:Guerrero


Known for: One of Mexico’s poorest states, Guerrero is home to what was once the country’s poshest resort. Acapulco, set on a bay surrounded by high rises and the Sierra Madre del Sur, used to attract Hollywood stars and Mexico’s elite.


Homicide rate: 59 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: The cartel that once dominated Acapulco and the rest of the state fractured years ago, leaving smaller criminal groups to violently vie for power. There are more than a dozen gangs fighting in Acapulco, which is now Mexico’s homicide capital. Up in the Tierra Caliente, a region that encompasses parts of northern Guerrero and neighboring Michoacan state, gangs have been battling for control of poppy production. Poppy grown in Guerrero and other states has made Mexico the No. 1 exporter of heroin to the U.S.


“Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero,” the U.S. warned in its travel advisory, adding that members of those groups “frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.”

Quote:Michoacan


Known for: A mostly agricultural state, Michoacan is a key avocado and lime producer. It is also a top sender of migrants to the U.S.


Homicide rate: 59 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: Violence erupted in Michoacan starting in the mid-2000s, as cartels battling for control of methamphetamine production expanded to extortion and kidnapping. The government’s failure to bring order spawned a citizen vigilante movement, and to this day, masked citizen police roam the state. In some towns, they have taken over local governments.

Quote:Sinaloa


Known for: A long, skinny state that hugs the Pacific coast, Sinaloa is known for its ample agricultural production and as the birthplace of banda — a beloved musical genre heavy on brass and percussion. It was also the birthplace of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, a poor kid who sold oranges in the street before becoming Mexico’s most infamous drug cartel leader.


Homicide rate: 41 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: After Guzman’s arrest and extradition to the U.S. last year, his Sinaloa cartel fragmented into warring factions. Those factions are fighting each other as well as well as gangsters aligned with the ascendant Jalisco New Generation cartel, which has quickly taken control of wide swaths of the country with its brutal tactics.


“Violent crime is widespread,” the U.S. warned in its travel advisory for Sinaloa.

Quote:Tamaulipas


Known for: A border state located on Mexico’s Caribbean coast, Tamaulipas has long been defined by its proximity to the United States. A large amount of Mexican trade travels through the state, and U.S. citizens frequently cross into Matamoros and Reynosa, across the border from Brownsville and McAllen, Texas, respectively.


Homicide rate: 20 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: Tamaulipas has been engulfed in violence between factions of the Gulf cartel and the Zetas criminal group. While the homicide rate there is not as high as in other states, extortion and kidnappings are rampant. About one-fourth of all kidnappings in Mexico occur in the state.


“Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion and sexual assault, is common,” the U.S. travel advisory said, adding that armed criminal groups have targeted public and private passenger buses traveling through the state, “often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments.”


“Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence,” the advisory warned.

Just a matter of time before we have to deal with the failed state of Mexico. #shitehole
01-12-2018 01:05 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply

stinkfist Online
laughing at MSM meltdown
*

Posts: 35,796
Joined: Nov 2011
Reputation: 1469
I Root For: StL Cards & USM
Location: who knows?
Post: #2
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
naw.....we don't need a wall.....

just give 'em flowers and a hen peck on each side of the cheek and leave your possessions unprotected......


allowing illegal immigration should work out just fine down the roe-add.....

we inherited dum-dum land.....

great job LBJ, NIXON, (ford gets a free pass), CARTER, reagan, BUSH, clinton, dubya, and ZERO......

way to go boys and GIRLS.....sigh

thank you #henceDJT....I can only hope this experiment works and continues after you finish your term.....
01-12-2018 01:51 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Fort Bend Owl Online
Hall of Famer
*

Posts: 19,204
Joined: Jun 2005
Reputation: 201
I Root For: An easy win
Location:

The Parliament Awards
Post: #3
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
St. Louis' death rate was also 59 for every 100K in 2017. If you're looking at the last city on that list (20 death rate for every 100K population), that's equal or lower than almost the top 20 cities death rates in the U.S. last year.

In order those cities are St. Louis, Baltimore, Detroit, New Orleans, Birmingham, Jackson (Miss), Baton Rouge, Hartford, Salinas, Milwaukee, Washington DC, Kansas City, Savannah, Cincinnati, West Palm Beach, Memphis, Oakland (CA), San Bernadino and Atlanta.

I'm sure those Mexican states have some very rough areas, but I imagine the cruise ships are still going to Manzanilla and Acapulco. I have a co-worker who goes to Mexico once or twice a year to visit relatives. She goes into Matamoros and says it's dangerous with lots of kidnappings but Mexican-Americans who travel through there are fine as long as they bring extra money with them in case they get stopped by gangs (basically a very high toll rate as she describes it). One of these days I wonder if she won't make it back alive, but so far so good for her. I'm not sure why she keeps going but she does.
01-12-2018 07:02 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Motown Bronco Offline
Hall of Famer
*

Posts: 13,700
Joined: Jul 2002
Reputation: 176
I Root For: WMU
Location: Metro Detroit
Post: #4
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
The results of decades of strict Drug Prohibition. Little was learned from the Alcohol Prohibition of 1920s.

I'm not advocating heroin and hard drugs be sold at your local stores. But a saner policy toward soft drugs - and focus on rehabilitation instead of incarceration - may have avoided a lot of this.
01-12-2018 08:03 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply

stinkfist Online
laughing at MSM meltdown
*

Posts: 35,796
Joined: Nov 2011
Reputation: 1469
I Root For: StL Cards & USM
Location: who knows?
Post: #5
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
(01-12-2018 08:03 AM)Motown Bronco Wrote:  The results of decades of strict Drug Prohibition. Little was learned from the Alcohol Prohibition of 1920s.

I'm not advocating heroin and hard drugs be sold at your local stores. But a saner policy toward soft drugs - and focus on rehabilitation instead of incarceration - may have avoided a lot of this.

this is where we wholeheartedly agree relative to the root cause with the exception it started back in robber baron era....

it became a non-issue after dealing with WWII and the Korean war......however, once the Vietnam hippie movement/coverage exploded, LBJ/tricky dicky chose the wrong methodology that contributed heavily to the divide we now live in today....
01-12-2018 08:57 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
BuffaloTN Offline
All American
*

Posts: 2,568
Joined: Aug 2011
Reputation: 183
I Root For: Memphis
Location:
Post: #6
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
(01-12-2018 08:03 AM)Motown Bronco Wrote:  The results of decades of strict Drug Prohibition. Little was learned from the Alcohol Prohibition of 1920s.

I'm not advocating heroin and hard drugs be sold at your local stores. But a saner policy toward soft drugs - and focus on rehabilitation instead of incarceration - may have avoided a lot of this.

Yes and Sessions is going the opposite direction on this. He needs to go.
01-12-2018 09:02 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Kaplony Offline
Palmetto State Deplorable
*

Posts: 19,521
Joined: Apr 2013
Reputation: 1742
I Root For: Newberry
Location: SC
Post: #7
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
(01-12-2018 08:03 AM)Motown Bronco Wrote:  The results of decades of strict Drug Prohibition. Little was learned from the Alcohol Prohibition of 1920s.

I'm not advocating heroin and hard drugs be sold at your local stores. But a saner policy toward soft drugs - and focus on rehabilitation instead of incarceration - may have avoided a lot of this.

And every time someone posts something like this we learn that absolutely nothing was learned from the aftermath of the 21st Amendment.

These drugs cartels, just like the mob post Prohibition, aren't going to simply fade away. They will just shift their business model to something else.

This naïve idea that legalizing weed and softening the stance on other drugs will suddenly make the crime rate drop to nothing is a rainbows and unicorn fantasy without a basis in reality. If anything the idea of a bunch of suddenly cash strapped drug cartels sitting in Mexico desperate for money with first hand experience the best ways to smuggle items into the US should scare the **** out of rational people.

But I guess it wouldn't matter to the "smoke it up" crowd....just burn a doobie while ISIS, Al Qaeda, whomever contracts these desperate for money folks to smuggle whatever they want into the country. Couple hundred Americans slaughtered? Big deal....you got your legal weed man!
01-12-2018 11:32 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
rath v2.0 Offline
Wartime Consigliere
*

Posts: 32,758
Joined: Jun 2007
Reputation: 802
I Root For: Three Floyds
Location: ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Donators
Post: #8
RE: State Dept issues travel warnings for five Mexican states
(01-12-2018 01:05 AM)Kaplony Wrote:  http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-mexic...story.html

Quote:This week the United States told its citizens not to visit five violence-ridden Mexican states, placing them on the same warning level given to war-torn Somalia, Afghanistan and Syria.


The State Department’s newest travel advisory for Mexico included “do not travel” warnings for the northeastern border state of Tamaulipas and the Pacific coast states of Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan and Sinaloa. The advisory, released Wednesday, gave the states its highest-risk Category 4 warning, the same classification the U.S. has given conflict-racked nations such as Libya and Yemen.

Quote:Colima


Known for: The fourth smallest state in Mexico, Colima has the smallest population, with 650,000 residents. The city of Manzanillo, on the Pacific coast, boasts one of Mexico’s busiest ports, while the city’s beaches have long drawn both domestic tourists and international cruise ships.


Homicide rate: 83 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: Rival cartels have been battling for control of Manzanilla’s port, a primary point of entry for drugs from South and Central America as well as for precursor chemicals coming from Asia that are used to manufacture synthetic drugs. “Violent crime and gang activity are widespread,” the U.S. warned in its travel advisory. “Do not travel.”

Quote:Guerrero


Known for: One of Mexico’s poorest states, Guerrero is home to what was once the country’s poshest resort. Acapulco, set on a bay surrounded by high rises and the Sierra Madre del Sur, used to attract Hollywood stars and Mexico’s elite.


Homicide rate: 59 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: The cartel that once dominated Acapulco and the rest of the state fractured years ago, leaving smaller criminal groups to violently vie for power. There are more than a dozen gangs fighting in Acapulco, which is now Mexico’s homicide capital. Up in the Tierra Caliente, a region that encompasses parts of northern Guerrero and neighboring Michoacan state, gangs have been battling for control of poppy production. Poppy grown in Guerrero and other states has made Mexico the No. 1 exporter of heroin to the U.S.


“Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero,” the U.S. warned in its travel advisory, adding that members of those groups “frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.”

Quote:Michoacan


Known for: A mostly agricultural state, Michoacan is a key avocado and lime producer. It is also a top sender of migrants to the U.S.


Homicide rate: 59 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: Violence erupted in Michoacan starting in the mid-2000s, as cartels battling for control of methamphetamine production expanded to extortion and kidnapping. The government’s failure to bring order spawned a citizen vigilante movement, and to this day, masked citizen police roam the state. In some towns, they have taken over local governments.

Quote:Sinaloa


Known for: A long, skinny state that hugs the Pacific coast, Sinaloa is known for its ample agricultural production and as the birthplace of banda — a beloved musical genre heavy on brass and percussion. It was also the birthplace of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, a poor kid who sold oranges in the street before becoming Mexico’s most infamous drug cartel leader.


Homicide rate: 41 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: After Guzman’s arrest and extradition to the U.S. last year, his Sinaloa cartel fragmented into warring factions. Those factions are fighting each other as well as well as gangsters aligned with the ascendant Jalisco New Generation cartel, which has quickly taken control of wide swaths of the country with its brutal tactics.


“Violent crime is widespread,” the U.S. warned in its travel advisory for Sinaloa.

Quote:Tamaulipas


Known for: A border state located on Mexico’s Caribbean coast, Tamaulipas has long been defined by its proximity to the United States. A large amount of Mexican trade travels through the state, and U.S. citizens frequently cross into Matamoros and Reynosa, across the border from Brownsville and McAllen, Texas, respectively.


Homicide rate: 20 deaths per 100,000 people in the first 11 months of 2017.


What’s happening: Tamaulipas has been engulfed in violence between factions of the Gulf cartel and the Zetas criminal group. While the homicide rate there is not as high as in other states, extortion and kidnappings are rampant. About one-fourth of all kidnappings in Mexico occur in the state.


“Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion and sexual assault, is common,” the U.S. travel advisory said, adding that armed criminal groups have targeted public and private passenger buses traveling through the state, “often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments.”


“Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence,” the advisory warned.

Just a matter of time before we have to deal with the failed state of Mexico. #shitehole

#sh!thole
01-12-2018 11:45 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2018 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2018 MyBB Group.