Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
Author Message
Stugray2 Offline
1st String
*

Posts: 1,819
Joined: Jan 2017
Reputation: 102
I Root For: tOSU SJSU
Location: South Bay Area CA
Post: #61
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
didn't mean to post
(This post was last modified: 03-28-2017 11:14 PM by Stugray2.)
03-28-2017 11:13 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
colohank Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 772
Joined: Jul 2014
Reputation: 57
I Root For: Cincy
Location: Colorado
Post: #62
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-28-2017 09:23 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 03:52 PM)colohank Wrote:  With Lake Mead at historic lows and the Colorado River seriously over-subscribed, Las Vegas is a couple of heartbeats away from running out of water. No water, no glitz. No glitz, no town. The long term outlook for that contrived, over-developed, over-populated "oasis" is bleak.

I used to hear that about Phoenix as a kid in the 80's. They've tripled in size since then. I remember when I was in Greenville people telling me about how all these western cities were going to be gone because there was no water. I'd ask them about their experience out West to always get the reply "I've never been there" I won't speak for Vegas but most Western towns get tons of mountain snow in the winter which melts in the spring, flows down into the city and sustains them. (Denver, Albuquerque, Salt Lake, Tahoe)....Las Vegas has mountains too, maybe not like the Front Range, but doesn't that process happen there too? Maybe I'm wrong; I realize Vegas is a hellava lot hotter than Denver and Albuquerque, Salt Lake etc.

I live in western Colorado, about a quarter-mile from the Colorado River. My subdivision fronts on it, and I can see it from my front yard. By eastern standards, it's a stream.

Historically, it experienced heroic spring floods, but much of the year, its flow was little more than a trickle.

Lake Mead, and later, Lake Powell, were created to capture those immense spring flows, but losses to evaporation (they have large surface areas) and seepage into porous sandstones render those impoundments counter-productive. That's why both reservoirs sport large bathtub rings. Water levels are falling faster than they can be replenished, even in years with above-average snows in source areas, and even in years when spring warmups are rapid and produce more meltwater than can be used by upstream agriculture and communities. In years when the melt is more gradual, much of the Colorado River's flow never makes it as far downstream as Lakes Powell and Mead. The original National Park Service marina developments on those impoundments have been left high and dry.

As you noted in your post, the population in Phoenix has tripled since you lived there as a kid in the 1980s. The population of Clark County, NV is almost two million. Meanwhile, no legal sleight-of-hand or political smoke-and-mirrors are capable of producing more water than Mother Nature offers. Demand already far exceeds supply, and it's only going to get worse.

By oversubscribed, I mean that existing adjudicated agricultural and municipal rights in the US and Mexico exceed the amount of water that's actually available. As Phoenix and Las Vegas grow (and yes, I'm familiar with both cities), so grows additional demand. Agricultural interests in California claim a huge share, too. By treaty, Mexico is entitled to some of the Colorado River flow, and some of the water now stored in Lake Mead actually belongs to Mexico.

I'll stand by my earlier prediction. Las Vegas is screwed, maybe not immediately, but eventually. The situation there simply isn't sustainable. Those who gamble big on Las Vegas's long-term viability lose.
03-29-2017 10:23 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Frank the Tank Offline
Hall of Famer
*

Posts: 10,820
Joined: Jun 2008
Reputation: 490
I Root For: Illinois/DePaul
Location: Chicago
Post: #63
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-28-2017 09:39 PM)BearcatJerry Wrote:  
(03-27-2017 03:00 PM)PlayBall! Wrote:  Now that a big, fancy FB stadium will get built for the Raiders (very near to UNLV and the airport?), UNLV is a _sure bet_ for the PAC-12 or possibly the Big XII if UNLV has access to that stadium (and can/does have use of the new hockey facility just across The Strip to host UNLV's BB, etc.?)

03-hissyfit A screaming deal for the first P5 conference to step up! 03-hissyfit

OK, wait...

According to SDSU fans, the Chargers LEAVING the San Diego market is a boon, since it frees up the market from football competition.

According to you, now the Raiders ENTERING the Las Vegas market is a boon for UNLV because it brings resources...

Which one is right? Wouldn't this be more akin to SDSU being relegated to second class citizen status in their own city and without their own stadium?

Here's the thing with the supposed "pro sports market" vs. "college sports market" divide: EVERY TV market that is worth anything in this country is a pro sports market. At the same time, TV rights value are what drive conference realignment decisions more than any other factor. As a result, if a school hopes to have P5 membership, it is almost certainly going to have to show that it can deliver TV households in a market where it's competing with pro sports. Virtually any market that a P5 conference would want is inherently a pro sports market (or else it wouldn't be worth having at all in the first place).

Even in the case of a school like Texas, which is physically located in the non-pro sports market of Austin, it is NOT valued for its Austin viewership. Instead, it's valued because it delivers viewers across an entire state with decidedly pro sports markets like Dallas and Houston. If a school doesn't deliver a critical mass of pro sports market viewers, then it's worthless from a conference realignment perspective.

Now, that doesn't mean that UNLV is automatically better off with the Raiders in town. UNLV still needs to walk the walk with respect to its athletic and academic programs in order to be a viable P5 candidate. However, the Raiders (and to a lesser extent, the NHL) moving to Las Vegas does indicate that the market can no longer be passed off as just a small transient tourist-based market. Its current growth arc is comparable to the growth of the Central Florida and Phoenix regions over the past few decades where they transitioned from small towns to true large markets in fairly short order. The relative value of a school like Florida or Arizona State for realignment purposes has increased drastically over the past 25 years even though they were introduced to significant direct pro sports competition in their backyards during that time frame because their underlying markets have been growing even faster. The Las Vegas market is looking like it's in the same boat (albeit its earlier in its growth cycle). The Raiders aren't directly better for UNLV, but what the Raiders *represent* in terms of the growth prospects overall for the Las Vegas market indicates there's a high potential value for UNLV.
(This post was last modified: 03-29-2017 10:34 AM by Frank the Tank.)
03-29-2017 10:24 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Frank the Tank Offline
Hall of Famer
*

Posts: 10,820
Joined: Jun 2008
Reputation: 490
I Root For: Illinois/DePaul
Location: Chicago
Post: #64
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
Further to the last point, San Diego is in a different stage of its growth cycle compared to Las Vegas (or even places like Phoenix, Orlando and Tampa). It's a much more mature growth in population (which is also limited by the physical terrain of Southern California and corresponding prices), which means that there is some credence to the argument that a pro sports team leaving could leave more people interested in SDSU. The overall proverbial pie of San Diego isn't expanding that rapidly anymore, so existing sports teams are fighting to retain their own pieces of that pie. As of now, the overall pie of Las Vegas is expanding so quickly that teams aren't fighting over slices as of now - even if the Raiders eat a lot of the pie right now, there's going to be more pie baked very quickly. The nature of the sports competition in a mature market like San Diego is going to be different compared to a fast-growing market like Las Vegas.

TL;DR: I really want some pie.
03-29-2017 10:33 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
CougarRed Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 9,797
Joined: Feb 2006
Reputation: 288
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #65
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-28-2017 09:32 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  CougarRed, I agree with everything you say about UNLV. But you did say "academic profiles move at the speed of a glacier, reputations lag etc". Houston is now a R1 research school and has had its academic reputation rise dramatically in the past 10 years. Coogs have moved up academically very very rapidly.

Take Houston for example. President Renu Khator arrived in January 2008 and has worked wonders over 9 years. We've spent over $1B building new classrooms, new dorms, new athletic facilities and new parking garages. Our research is way up.

As a result, UH has become more attractive to students, and has admitted higher caliber students (average SAT scores are up 95 points). Freshmen applications are up almost 100% from 9 years ago. Undergrad enrollment has blossomed from 27K to 35K.

The campus has become a more attractive place to live, and more than twice as many undergrads in general (and freshmen in particular) live on campus now than 9 years ago.

Even so, our 6-year graduation rate has only moved from 43% to 51% in nine years. The 6 year grad rate impacts 25% of the USNWR rankings. As a result, our USNWR rankings haven't moved much.

This is what I mean.

It takes a miracle worker like Khator to change the course of a public university. And even so, we won't see a significant climb in the USNWR rankings until 2020 when our 6-year grad rate surpasses 60% (as it is predicted to do).

So, unless UNLV is making huge investments to position itself as a much more attractive option to HS students, they've got no chance.
03-29-2017 10:42 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
CougarRed Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 9,797
Joined: Feb 2006
Reputation: 288
I Root For: Houston
Location:
Post: #66
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-29-2017 10:24 AM)Frank the Tank Wrote:  Here's the thing with the supposed "pro sports market" vs. "college sports market" divide: EVERY TV market that is worth anything in this country is a pro sports market. At the same time, TV rights value are what drive conference realignment decisions more than any other factor. As a result, if a school hopes to have P5 membership, it is almost certainly going to have to show that it can deliver TV households in a market where it's competing with pro sports. Virtually any market that a P5 conference would want is inherently a pro sports market (or else it wouldn't be worth having at all in the first place).

Houston has certainly done so in a decidedly pro market. Nearly 34 million viewers the last two football seasons. More than half the Pac 12. More than half the ACC. More than any other G5 school. See below.

I really feel one of those two leagues will take Houston in the next round of realignment, as our 6-year grad rate should be acceptable (over 65%) by 2021. Both of them could monetize the Houston market with their conference networks.

But the big prize is UT, and both will wait to see what happens with the Big 12 before committing to UH.


Attached File(s)
.png  Screenshot 2017-03-29 11.15.08.png (Size: 131.11 KB / Downloads: 3)
(This post was last modified: 03-29-2017 11:19 AM by CougarRed.)
03-29-2017 11:09 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
billybobby777 Offline
Fighting the cartel 5
*

Posts: 9,536
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 351
I Root For: ECU, Army
Location: Houston dont sleepon
Post: #67
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-29-2017 10:23 AM)colohank Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 09:23 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 03:52 PM)colohank Wrote:  With Lake Mead at historic lows and the Colorado River seriously over-subscribed, Las Vegas is a couple of heartbeats away from running out of water. No water, no glitz. No glitz, no town. The long term outlook for that contrived, over-developed, over-populated "oasis" is bleak.

I used to hear that about Phoenix as a kid in the 80's. They've tripled in size since then. I remember when I was in Greenville people telling me about how all these western cities were going to be gone because there was no water. I'd ask them about their experience out West to always get the reply "I've never been there" I won't speak for Vegas but most Western towns get tons of mountain snow in the winter which melts in the spring, flows down into the city and sustains them. (Denver, Albuquerque, Salt Lake, Tahoe)....Las Vegas has mountains too, maybe not like the Front Range, but doesn't that process happen there too? Maybe I'm wrong; I realize Vegas is a hellava lot hotter than Denver and Albuquerque, Salt Lake etc.

I live in western Colorado, about a quarter-mile from the Colorado River. My subdivision fronts on it, and I can see it from my front yard. By eastern standards, it's a stream.

Historically, it experienced heroic spring floods, but much of the year, its flow was little more than a trickle.

Lake Mead, and later, Lake Powell, were created to capture those immense spring flows, but losses to evaporation (they have large surface areas) and seepage into porous sandstones render those impoundments counter-productive. That's why both reservoirs sport large bathtub rings. Water levels are falling faster than they can be replenished, even in years with above-average snows in source areas, and even in years when spring warmups are rapid and produce more meltwater than can be used by upstream agriculture and communities. In years when the melt is more gradual, much of the Colorado River's flow never makes it as far downstream as Lakes Powell and Mead. The original National Park Service marina developments on those impoundments have been left high and dry.

As you noted in your post, the population in Phoenix has tripled since you lived there as a kid in the 1980s. The population of Clark County, NV is almost two million. Meanwhile, no legal sleight-of-hand or political smoke-and-mirrors are capable of producing more water than Mother Nature offers. Demand already far exceeds supply, and it's only going to get worse.

By oversubscribed, I mean that existing adjudicated agricultural and municipal rights in the US and Mexico exceed the amount of water that's actually available. As Phoenix and Las Vegas grow (and yes, I'm familiar with both cities), so grows additional demand. Agricultural interests in California claim a huge share, too. By treaty, Mexico is entitled to some of the Colorado River flow, and some of the water now stored in Lake Mead actually belongs to Mexico.

I'll stand by my earlier prediction. Las Vegas is screwed, maybe not immediately, but eventually. The situation there simply isn't sustainable. Those who gamble big on Las Vegas's long-term viability lose.

In how many years? The attitude out there isn't worrying about water at all. They seem to think they'll grow and grow and grow....I like your expertise on this subject. I know in Mountain western cities like Denver and Albuquerque that there's these huge water basins under the cities with 100 year water supplies...And they are 6,000, 7,000 feet high with Mountain snows. Maybe those are bad examples because those aren't really desert cities. Maybe Phoenix would be a better comparison. Is Phoenix facing the same issue?
03-29-2017 07:18 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
dbackjon Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 5,579
Joined: May 2010
Reputation: 196
I Root For: NAU/Illini
Location:
Post: #68
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-27-2017 03:25 PM)Stugray2 Wrote:  Wow. I bet it does as much for UNLV football as Gillette has done for UMass football.


Not a fair comparison. This stadium will be a few miles from UNLV. UMass to Gillette is 90 minutes in good traffic.

This is more like Pitt and Heinz Field
03-29-2017 07:40 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
dbackjon Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 5,579
Joined: May 2010
Reputation: 196
I Root For: NAU/Illini
Location:
Post: #69
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-29-2017 07:18 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  
(03-29-2017 10:23 AM)colohank Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 09:23 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 03:52 PM)colohank Wrote:  With Lake Mead at historic lows and the Colorado River seriously over-subscribed, Las Vegas is a couple of heartbeats away from running out of water. No water, no glitz. No glitz, no town. The long term outlook for that contrived, over-developed, over-populated "oasis" is bleak.

I used to hear that about Phoenix as a kid in the 80's. They've tripled in size since then. I remember when I was in Greenville people telling me about how all these western cities were going to be gone because there was no water. I'd ask them about their experience out West to always get the reply "I've never been there" I won't speak for Vegas but most Western towns get tons of mountain snow in the winter which melts in the spring, flows down into the city and sustains them. (Denver, Albuquerque, Salt Lake, Tahoe)....Las Vegas has mountains too, maybe not like the Front Range, but doesn't that process happen there too? Maybe I'm wrong; I realize Vegas is a hellava lot hotter than Denver and Albuquerque, Salt Lake etc.

I live in western Colorado, about a quarter-mile from the Colorado River. My subdivision fronts on it, and I can see it from my front yard. By eastern standards, it's a stream.

Historically, it experienced heroic spring floods, but much of the year, its flow was little more than a trickle.

Lake Mead, and later, Lake Powell, were created to capture those immense spring flows, but losses to evaporation (they have large surface areas) and seepage into porous sandstones render those impoundments counter-productive. That's why both reservoirs sport large bathtub rings. Water levels are falling faster than they can be replenished, even in years with above-average snows in source areas, and even in years when spring warmups are rapid and produce more meltwater than can be used by upstream agriculture and communities. In years when the melt is more gradual, much of the Colorado River's flow never makes it as far downstream as Lakes Powell and Mead. The original National Park Service marina developments on those impoundments have been left high and dry.

As you noted in your post, the population in Phoenix has tripled since you lived there as a kid in the 1980s. The population of Clark County, NV is almost two million. Meanwhile, no legal sleight-of-hand or political smoke-and-mirrors are capable of producing more water than Mother Nature offers. Demand already far exceeds supply, and it's only going to get worse.

By oversubscribed, I mean that existing adjudicated agricultural and municipal rights in the US and Mexico exceed the amount of water that's actually available. As Phoenix and Las Vegas grow (and yes, I'm familiar with both cities), so grows additional demand. Agricultural interests in California claim a huge share, too. By treaty, Mexico is entitled to some of the Colorado River flow, and some of the water now stored in Lake Mead actually belongs to Mexico.

I'll stand by my earlier prediction. Las Vegas is screwed, maybe not immediately, but eventually. The situation there simply isn't sustainable. Those who gamble big on Las Vegas's long-term viability lose.

In how many years? The attitude out there isn't worrying about water at all. They seem to think they'll grow and grow and grow....I like your expertise on this subject. I know in Mountain western cities like Denver and Albuquerque that there's these huge water basins under the cities with 100 year water supplies...And they are 6,000, 7,000 feet high with Mountain snows. Maybe those are bad examples because those aren't really desert cities. Maybe Phoenix would be a better comparison. Is Phoenix facing the same issue?


Phoenix and Vegas are two different animals, water wise.

Phoenix gets a major portion of it's water from the Salt-Verde River system, which drains the mountains of Eastern/Central Arizona and flows through Phoenix (well, in wet years, most years it is diverted completely). Vegas has no such river, as it doesn't hold much water rights to the Colorado (Arizona owns 100% of the Salt/Verde flow and the vast majority of the Gila River water).

Phoenix actually uses the same amount of water today as it did in the 50's - due to conversion of irrigated farm fields to housing, etc, which use far less water. Vegas has no such water to convert to non-farm uses.

Phoenix has an excess of water right now - a majority of the water Phoenix gets from the Colorado River is banked - injected into the aquifers to be used at a later time.
03-29-2017 07:51 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
MplsBison Offline
Banned

Posts: 16,648
Joined: Dec 2014
I Root For: NDSU/Minnesota
Location:
Post: #70
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
Sorry, didn't read the thread ... but the below facts stands fine on their own:

- Even if UNLV becomes the next Boise St, in this great stadium, it still has zero chance at joining the PAC. Not enough research or academic reputation. Simple as that.

- So with that said, the MWC is as high as you can go in the West for a football conf. And they're already there.


And I do agree that new LV stadium should host a bowl game. Turn the LV bowl into a higher-profile PAC v Big Ten matchup! With BYU getting a slice.
(This post was last modified: 03-29-2017 08:50 PM by MplsBison.)
03-29-2017 08:48 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
MplsBison Offline
Banned

Posts: 16,648
Joined: Dec 2014
I Root For: NDSU/Minnesota
Location:
Post: #71
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
What will become of UNLV's current stadium? Just used for soccer?? Seems like a waste.
03-29-2017 08:50 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
UTEPDallas Offline
All American
*

Posts: 3,851
Joined: Oct 2004
Reputation: 111
I Root For: UTEP/Penn State
Location: Dallas, TX
Post: #72
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-29-2017 08:50 PM)MplsBison Wrote:  What will become of UNLV's current stadium? Just used for soccer?? Seems like a waste.

I follow rugby and I know the Rugby 7s is played at Sam Boyd. They might stay there since an NFL stadium might be too big for rugby or they might have to move if the stadium gets demolished.
03-29-2017 10:04 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Stugray2 Offline
1st String
*

Posts: 1,819
Joined: Jan 2017
Reputation: 102
I Root For: tOSU SJSU
Location: South Bay Area CA
Post: #73
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
Frank seriously underestimates the how much money UNLV will have to raise to be P5 level. The average P5 budget is north of $75m, and UNLV is optimistically $30m. It would take a Rutgers level of debt accumulation to build up the program for the next decade. But Rutgers is a much larger school, with a larger tax base and much higher academic and research situation.

The problem UNLV has is they have to ramp up all three simultaneously to be a serious player. I just don't see that in the cards. Also that comparison of UNLV to mega-sized Arizona State and Florida State doesn't hold water. Those are far bigger schools, much better academically. UNLV is starting from barely above Boise State standards. I simply see this analysis as typical easterner not understanding the west very much.
03-29-2017 11:13 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
MplsBison Offline
Banned

Posts: 16,648
Joined: Dec 2014
I Root For: NDSU/Minnesota
Location:
Post: #74
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
Not to say that UNLV couldn't follow the path of Arizona St ... but it would take a really big investment to bootstrap their research up to that level. Facilities would need to be built, and faculty hired with big start up grants from prestigious schools. Even then, it would take some time to establish the campus environment as being suitable to be competitive for the best grants.
03-30-2017 08:12 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
billybobby777 Offline
Fighting the cartel 5
*

Posts: 9,536
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 351
I Root For: ECU, Army
Location: Houston dont sleepon
Post: #75
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-29-2017 07:51 PM)dbackjon Wrote:  
(03-29-2017 07:18 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  
(03-29-2017 10:23 AM)colohank Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 09:23 PM)billybobby777 Wrote:  
(03-28-2017 03:52 PM)colohank Wrote:  With Lake Mead at historic lows and the Colorado River seriously over-subscribed, Las Vegas is a couple of heartbeats away from running out of water. No water, no glitz. No glitz, no town. The long term outlook for that contrived, over-developed, over-populated "oasis" is bleak.

I used to hear that about Phoenix as a kid in the 80's. They've tripled in size since then. I remember when I was in Greenville people telling me about how all these western cities were going to be gone because there was no water. I'd ask them about their experience out West to always get the reply "I've never been there" I won't speak for Vegas but most Western towns get tons of mountain snow in the winter which melts in the spring, flows down into the city and sustains them. (Denver, Albuquerque, Salt Lake, Tahoe)....Las Vegas has mountains too, maybe not like the Front Range, but doesn't that process happen there too? Maybe I'm wrong; I realize Vegas is a hellava lot hotter than Denver and Albuquerque, Salt Lake etc.

I live in western Colorado, about a quarter-mile from the Colorado River. My subdivision fronts on it, and I can see it from my front yard. By eastern standards, it's a stream.

Historically, it experienced heroic spring floods, but much of the year, its flow was little more than a trickle.

Lake Mead, and later, Lake Powell, were created to capture those immense spring flows, but losses to evaporation (they have large surface areas) and seepage into porous sandstones render those impoundments counter-productive. That's why both reservoirs sport large bathtub rings. Water levels are falling faster than they can be replenished, even in years with above-average snows in source areas, and even in years when spring warmups are rapid and produce more meltwater than can be used by upstream agriculture and communities. In years when the melt is more gradual, much of the Colorado River's flow never makes it as far downstream as Lakes Powell and Mead. The original National Park Service marina developments on those impoundments have been left high and dry.

As you noted in your post, the population in Phoenix has tripled since you lived there as a kid in the 1980s. The population of Clark County, NV is almost two million. Meanwhile, no legal sleight-of-hand or political smoke-and-mirrors are capable of producing more water than Mother Nature offers. Demand already far exceeds supply, and it's only going to get worse.

By oversubscribed, I mean that existing adjudicated agricultural and municipal rights in the US and Mexico exceed the amount of water that's actually available. As Phoenix and Las Vegas grow (and yes, I'm familiar with both cities), so grows additional demand. Agricultural interests in California claim a huge share, too. By treaty, Mexico is entitled to some of the Colorado River flow, and some of the water now stored in Lake Mead actually belongs to Mexico.

I'll stand by my earlier prediction. Las Vegas is screwed, maybe not immediately, but eventually. The situation there simply isn't sustainable. Those who gamble big on Las Vegas's long-term viability lose.

In how many years? The attitude out there isn't worrying about water at all. They seem to think they'll grow and grow and grow....I like your expertise on this subject. I know in Mountain western cities like Denver and Albuquerque that there's these huge water basins under the cities with 100 year water supplies...And they are 6,000, 7,000 feet high with Mountain snows. Maybe those are bad examples because those aren't really desert cities. Maybe Phoenix would be a better comparison. Is Phoenix facing the same issue?


Phoenix and Vegas are two different animals, water wise.

Phoenix gets a major portion of it's water from the Salt-Verde River system, which drains the mountains of Eastern/Central Arizona and flows through Phoenix (well, in wet years, most years it is diverted completely). Vegas has no such river, as it doesn't hold much water rights to the Colorado (Arizona owns 100% of the Salt/Verde flow and the vast majority of the Gila River water).

Phoenix actually uses the same amount of water today as it did in the 50's - due to conversion of irrigated farm fields to housing, etc, which use far less water. Vegas has no such water to convert to non-farm uses.

Phoenix has an excess of water right now - a majority of the water Phoenix gets from the Colorado River is banked - injected into the aquifers to be used at a later time.

Thanks and "aquifer" is the word I was looking for. I've read up about western cities and water and they all seem to have plans in place or are in much wetter climates than Las Vegas...Vegas must be in denial.
03-30-2017 10:09 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
arkstfan Away
Sorry folks
*

Posts: 22,179
Joined: Feb 2004
Reputation: 650
I Root For: Fresh Starts
Location:
Post: #76
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-30-2017 08:12 AM)MplsBison Wrote:  Not to say that UNLV couldn't follow the path of Arizona St ... but it would take a really big investment to bootstrap their research up to that level. Facilities would need to be built, and faculty hired with big start up grants from prestigious schools. Even then, it would take some time to establish the campus environment as being suitable to be competitive for the best grants.

With the population growth, Las Vegas has a great deal more clout in the legislature. So maybe it is possible. After all once the Las Vegas growth started the UNLV supporters forced the campus in Reno to identify itself as Nevada-Reno instead of Nevada for years until the grudges, hurt feelings, and such settle down enough to let the old school start marketing as just Nevada again.

The question is whether the political will and capital exist to push UNLV forward.
03-30-2017 10:45 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
MplsBison Offline
Banned

Posts: 16,648
Joined: Dec 2014
I Root For: NDSU/Minnesota
Location:
Post: #77
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
But just like Boise vs Idaho ... why won't Nevada fight tooth and nail to be the one promoted?? They have the historical claim.

It's merely a matter of population.
03-30-2017 10:52 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
billybobby777 Offline
Fighting the cartel 5
*

Posts: 9,536
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 351
I Root For: ECU, Army
Location: Houston dont sleepon
Post: #78
RE: UNLV's Stock Is Rising (Raiders --> LV in 2020 approved by the NFL)
(03-30-2017 10:45 AM)arkstfan Wrote:  
(03-30-2017 08:12 AM)MplsBison Wrote:  Not to say that UNLV couldn't follow the path of Arizona St ... but it would take a really big investment to bootstrap their research up to that level. Facilities would need to be built, and faculty hired with big start up grants from prestigious schools. Even then, it would take some time to establish the campus environment as being suitable to be competitive for the best grants.

With the population growth, Las Vegas has a great deal more clout in the legislature. So maybe it is possible. After all once the Las Vegas growth started the UNLV supporters forced the campus in Reno to identify itself as Nevada-Reno instead of Nevada for years until the grudges, hurt feelings, and such settle down enough to let the old school start marketing as just Nevada again.

The question is whether the political will and capital exist to push UNLV forward.

I had a buddy who was from California and went to Nevada and would laugh when I called it that. He said everyone called it "Reno". This was a guy who graduated about 15 years ago. Do they finally call it Nevada now?
03-30-2017 12:04 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2018 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2018 MyBB Group.