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Memphis Landmarks
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oldmangrizz Offline
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Post: #561
RE: Memphis Landmarks
The Embers on Park had the best roquefort dressing (with big chunks of cheese) that I've ever had in my life. We would stop on the way home from church on Sundays and get a quart to take home for our Sunday salad and steak meals that my dad grilled each week.
09-28-2012 02:35 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #562
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: 7939153510_1d2e750168_b.jpg]

St. Patrick's Catholic Church

St. Patrick’s Catholic Church is one of Memphis’s most historic institutions. Tennessee’s Catholic Diocese in Nashville decided that another Catholic church should be established in Memphis because of the city’s population growth during and after the Civil War. The largest numbers of new citizens were African Americans from the surrounding plantation regions and Irish immigrants. Diocesan leaders saw St. Patrick’s, the third Catholic church founded in Memphis, as the church to minister to the large and growing Irish working-class population residing south of Union Avenue. St. Peter’s and St. Mary’s, the other two Catholic churches were, for the mid-nineteenth century, considered too far north (uptown) to minister to the needs of Catholics in south Memphis.

The Very Reverend Martin Riordan, V.G., conducted the church’s first mass in the St. Patrick’s parsonage, which was constructed in 1866 under his supervision. Riordan had already established a parish school in 1865. The Daily Avalanche of November 18, 1866, included a lengthy article about the elaborate ceremony in which Nashville Bishop Patrick Freehan laid the cornerstone for the new church at Linden and DeSoto (now Fourth Street); the completed church was dedicated on September 3, 1869. This original church was a plain brick structure about one hundred feet long and fifty feet wide.

In the second half of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, St. Patrick’s has become one of the most progressive churches in Memphis. Faced with typical inner-city problems, situated in one of the poorest zip-code zones in the United States, the church conducts an outreach ministry unrivaled by most Memphis churches. By the 1990s the church had started a program of providing affordable housing in the neighborhood in conjunction with the City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development. St. Patrick’s also built a new learning center that provides school care, youth sports programs, and a senior program in addition to other outreach programs. Recently its school, which had closed almost one hundred years after its opening, reopened as one of a growing number of Diocesan Jubilee Schools to educate neighborhood children. All of this is done, literally, in the shadow of the opulent $250 million FedEx Forum.

[Image: 2978680492_2987797d11_o.jpg]

[Image: 14344.jpg]
09-28-2012 03:33 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #563
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: 7896202856_86e5debed9_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896215818_5148edebc0_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896186944_b4810107b2_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896096834_7b440483b8_b.jpg]
09-28-2012 03:40 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #564
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: i48977255._szw1280h1280_.jpg.jfif]
William M. Randolph Mansion, Memphis TN photo Circa 1912

1865
THE WILLIAM M. RANDOLPH MANSION (ORIGINAL BUILDING DEMOLISHED) - A super exemple of Italian Renais sance architecture, the William M. Randolph Mansion stood among several elegant mansions which occupied an area between Wellington (now, Danny Thomas Boulevard) and Orleans.
A fire, excessive vandalism, and an inability to secure restoration funds, led to its demolition in 1976.
William Randolph was a lawyer from Little Rock, Arkansas, who eventually became a judge in Memphis. He built the Randolph Office Building in 1891. In the late 1800s, Randolph unsuccessfully argued for the rights of a black man to sit anywhere he wished on a train.
The case went to the U.S. Supreme Court which determined that the railroad could sit customers where they wanted as long as the seats were of equal quality. This 1896 decision (Plessy v. Ferguson) established the policy of separate but equal facilities.

.
09-28-2012 05:20 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #565
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: i48967650._szw1280h1280_.jpg.jfif]
Left to right: Nathan's Loan (176-178 Beale) and The Bensieck Building (182-184 Beale), circa 1951. Now Rum Boogie Cafe

BENSIECK BUILDING (ENTRANCE TO RUM BOOGIE CAFE) - ca. 1921, is constructed. Located at 182-184 Beale Street, Memphis, Tennessee,

Frank Bensieck owned property on the street which he purchased in 1880. He operated his bakery and steam ice cream manufacturing business, originally named Berton's Confectionery, at this address from 1878 to 1902, when he sold it to William C. Smith.

Like many small businessmen of the time, he lived on the premises. The original building was a three-story elongated structure with ovens in the rear for baking.

The present building was built after Bensieck retired.

In 1927 the west side of the building (182 Beale) contained the Beale Street Music Shop before the Blue Light Photography Studio replaced it in 1932.

In 1941 Blue Light relocated their facility next to Lansky Brothers. Howard's Drug Store occupied the east side of the building (184 Beale), from 1921 until 1945.

Paul's Tailoring Shop, operated by Paul J. Vescova, opened around 1948 and remained there throughout the 1960s.

He eventually took over the entire building.

With his motto, "Where the Smart Crowd Follows", and advertising expert tailoring and the latest in drape styles, Vescova attracted many entertainers, such as Dwight "Gatemouth" Moore.

He also had a tie-in with the Palace Theater, sponsoring events and acting as a ticket outlet.
09-28-2012 05:27 PM
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TigerBo Offline
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Post: #566
RE: Memphis Landmarks
(07-30-2012 08:44 PM)Cletus Wrote:  
(07-30-2012 08:24 PM)georgiatiger Wrote:  I wasted away many summers at the Moose Club swimming pool in Raleigh. Got one of that, Cletus?

The property is for sale ............ Wanna buy it?

Quote:Former Moose Lodge
4033 Raleigh Millington Road, Memphis, TN 38128


[Image: xy_F818F3A8-4762-41B6-AF69-177E3C85CE2E__.jpg]

Highlights
Owner Financing Possible
Great location for church retreat or youth ministry activities
Lodge currently has large banquet area that is currently set up for church services for 300 plus people
11 acres of heavily wooded property that would be great for camping, scouts etc.
3 + acres and approx. 300 ft of frontage that could be rezoned and sold as a commercial pad
RS8 Zoning (Residential Single Family)
Description
Former Moose Lodge most recently used as Church. Large Banquet Kitchen w/equipment Buildings in poor condition.

West side of Raleigh Millington Road, 300 feet North of the intersection of St. Elmo and Raleigh Millinton Road. 3 Miles from I-240, I-40 Interchange.

Lived there summers in the 70s... they had to have one of the best Cheeseburgers in Mphs back then.
09-30-2012 05:10 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #567
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: cobblestone-1920s.jpg]
Cobblestones at Memphis Riverfront Landing in the Circa late 1920's

[Image: cobblestone-c1910-pc.jpg]
Circa 1910

[Image: cobblestone-c1883-johniverton.jpg]

[Image: cobblestones-1906.jpg]

[Image: cobblestone-pc-new-wagon.jpg]

[Image: cobblestone-cotton-1908.jpg]
Circa 1908

[Image: cobblestone-1912.jpg]
Circa 1912

[Image: cobblestone-cotton-1913.jpg]
Circa 1913
10-04-2012 01:37 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #568
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: 7335707666_41ec936154_b.jpg]

Hoehn Chevrolet, 370 Union Ave., Memphis, Tenn. - Circa 1960

The Hoehn family has been in the car business since Hoehn Chevrolet was founded in 1928 by Theodore W. Hoehn. In 1938 the company, headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee was transferred to Theodore W. "Bill" Hoehn, Junior. After moving to La Jolla, California for what turned out to be a short-lived retirement, Bill founded Hoehn Motors in Carlsbad in 1975. Bill's two sons Bill and Bob now own the business.

Thanks to this dealership, Johnny Cash got together with his original famous backing musicians Luther Monroe Perkins and Marshall Grant - the Tennessee Two.

Roy Cash, Sr., Johnny's older brother, was service manager at Hoehn Chevrolet. In 1953, while the younger Cash was stationed in Germany with the US Air Force, Luther Perkins joined the staff at Automobile Sales, where he met co-workers Marshall Grant and A.W. 'Red' Kernodle. Grant, Kernodle and Perkins began bringing their guitars to work, and would play together when repair business was slow.

When Johnny moved to Memphis after returning from Germany in 1954, Roy Cash introduced him to Grant, Kernodle and Perkins. The four began to get together in the evenings at Perkins' or Grant's home and play songs. It was during this time that they decided to form a band, with Grant moving to an upright bass, Kernodle to a six-string steel guitar, and Perkins buying a Fender Esquire electric guitar Perkins' performance style on the Fender resulted in the band's famous steady, simple "boom-chicka-boom" or "freight train" rhythm.

By 1955, Cash and his bandmates were in the Memphis studio of Sun Records, to audition for owner Sam Phillips. Kernodle was so nervous that he left the session, not wanting to hold back the group. The band presented themselves as the "Tennessee Three", but Phillips suggested that they call themselves Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two. The Tennessee Two became The Tennessee Three when drummer W.S. Holland joined the group in 1960. (The Tennessee Three)

Union Avenue was packed with car dealerships back then. At the time, there was also a Hoehn Chevy lot on Summer Avenue below.

[Image: 8057017891_713827e133_b.jpg]

.
(This post was last modified: 10-05-2012 11:47 AM by Cletus.)
10-05-2012 11:36 AM
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KRB Offline
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Post: #569
RE: Memphis Landmarks
Get goin , get goin, get goin down to Hoehn for your Chevrolet. I can remember that commercial jingle still to this day.
10-05-2012 12:11 PM
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Willie Becton Offline
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Post: #570
RE: Memphis Landmarks
(09-28-2012 03:40 PM)Cletus Wrote:  [Image: 7896202856_86e5debed9_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896215818_5148edebc0_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896186944_b4810107b2_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896096834_7b440483b8_b.jpg]

dude youre a messy eater!
02-13-banana
10-05-2012 02:44 PM
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Redbanksdog Online
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Post: #571
RE: Memphis Landmarks
(10-05-2012 11:36 AM)Cletus Wrote:  [Image: 7335707666_41ec936154_b.jpg]

Hoehn Chevrolet, 370 Union Ave., Memphis, Tenn. - Circa 1960

The Hoehn family has been in the car business since Hoehn Chevrolet was founded in 1928 by Theodore W. Hoehn. In 1938 the company, headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee was transferred to Theodore W. "Bill" Hoehn, Junior. After moving to La Jolla, California for what turned out to be a short-lived retirement, Bill founded Hoehn Motors in Carlsbad in 1975. Bill's two sons Bill and Bob now own the business.

Thanks to this dealership, Johnny Cash got together with his original famous backing musicians Luther Monroe Perkins and Marshall Grant - the Tennessee Two.

Roy Cash, Sr., Johnny's older brother, was service manager at Hoehn Chevrolet. In 1953, while the younger Cash was stationed in Germany with the US Air Force, Luther Perkins joined the staff at Automobile Sales, where he met co-workers Marshall Grant and A.W. 'Red' Kernodle. Grant, Kernodle and Perkins began bringing their guitars to work, and would play together when repair business was slow.

When Johnny moved to Memphis after returning from Germany in 1954, Roy Cash introduced him to Grant, Kernodle and Perkins. The four began to get together in the evenings at Perkins' or Grant's home and play songs. It was during this time that they decided to form a band, with Grant moving to an upright bass, Kernodle to a six-string steel guitar, and Perkins buying a Fender Esquire electric guitar Perkins' performance style on the Fender resulted in the band's famous steady, simple "boom-chicka-boom" or "freight train" rhythm.

By 1955, Cash and his bandmates were in the Memphis studio of Sun Records, to audition for owner Sam Phillips. Kernodle was so nervous that he left the session, not wanting to hold back the group. The band presented themselves as the "Tennessee Three", but Phillips suggested that they call themselves Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two. The Tennessee Two became The Tennessee Three when drummer W.S. Holland joined the group in 1960. (The Tennessee Three)

Union Avenue was packed with car dealerships back then. At the time, there was also a Hoehn Chevy lot on Summer Avenue below.

[Image: 8057017891_713827e133_b.jpg]

.

Those trucks on the lot are from the early sixty. I love old cars and trucks.
10-05-2012 07:39 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #572
RE: Memphis Landmarks
(10-05-2012 07:39 PM)Redbanksdog Wrote:  
(10-05-2012 11:36 AM)Cletus Wrote:  [Image: 7335707666_41ec936154_b.jpg]

Hoehn Chevrolet, 370 Union Ave., Memphis, Tenn. - Circa 1960

The Hoehn family has been in the car business since Hoehn Chevrolet was founded in 1928 by Theodore W. Hoehn. In 1938 the company, headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee was transferred to Theodore W. "Bill" Hoehn, Junior. After moving to La Jolla, California for what turned out to be a short-lived retirement, Bill founded Hoehn Motors in Carlsbad in 1975. Bill's two sons Bill and Bob now own the business.

Thanks to this dealership, Johnny Cash got together with his original famous backing musicians Luther Monroe Perkins and Marshall Grant - the Tennessee Two.

Roy Cash, Sr., Johnny's older brother, was service manager at Hoehn Chevrolet. In 1953, while the younger Cash was stationed in Germany with the US Air Force, Luther Perkins joined the staff at Automobile Sales, where he met co-workers Marshall Grant and A.W. 'Red' Kernodle. Grant, Kernodle and Perkins began bringing their guitars to work, and would play together when repair business was slow.

When Johnny moved to Memphis after returning from Germany in 1954, Roy Cash introduced him to Grant, Kernodle and Perkins. The four began to get together in the evenings at Perkins' or Grant's home and play songs. It was during this time that they decided to form a band, with Grant moving to an upright bass, Kernodle to a six-string steel guitar, and Perkins buying a Fender Esquire electric guitar Perkins' performance style on the Fender resulted in the band's famous steady, simple "boom-chicka-boom" or "freight train" rhythm.

By 1955, Cash and his bandmates were in the Memphis studio of Sun Records, to audition for owner Sam Phillips. Kernodle was so nervous that he left the session, not wanting to hold back the group. The band presented themselves as the "Tennessee Three", but Phillips suggested that they call themselves Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two. The Tennessee Two became The Tennessee Three when drummer W.S. Holland joined the group in 1960. (The Tennessee Three)

Union Avenue was packed with car dealerships back then. At the time, there was also a Hoehn Chevy lot on Summer Avenue below.

[Image: 8057017891_713827e133_b.jpg]

.

Those trucks on the lot are from the early sixty. I love old cars and trucks.

Yep ...... 1960 Chevrolet Pickup

[Image: 8037337936_b5bb3e7ed9_b.jpg]
10-05-2012 09:32 PM
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Elvis Lives Offline
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Post: #573
RE: Memphis Landmarks
Tommy Hoehn was a very good musician back in the 70's and 80's. A member of the Hoehn family. Their estate was on Poplar and 240, right where the closed down Holiday Inn high rise is now.
10-05-2012 09:49 PM
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Redbanksdog Online
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Post: #574
RE: Memphis Landmarks
(10-05-2012 09:32 PM)Cletus Wrote:  
(10-05-2012 07:39 PM)Redbanksdog Wrote:  
(10-05-2012 11:36 AM)Cletus Wrote:  [Image: 7335707666_41ec936154_b.jpg]

Hoehn Chevrolet, 370 Union Ave., Memphis, Tenn. - Circa 1960

The Hoehn family has been in the car business since Hoehn Chevrolet was founded in 1928 by Theodore W. Hoehn. In 1938 the company, headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee was transferred to Theodore W. "Bill" Hoehn, Junior. After moving to La Jolla, California for what turned out to be a short-lived retirement, Bill founded Hoehn Motors in Carlsbad in 1975. Bill's two sons Bill and Bob now own the business.

Thanks to this dealership, Johnny Cash got together with his original famous backing musicians Luther Monroe Perkins and Marshall Grant - the Tennessee Two.

Roy Cash, Sr., Johnny's older brother, was service manager at Hoehn Chevrolet. In 1953, while the younger Cash was stationed in Germany with the US Air Force, Luther Perkins joined the staff at Automobile Sales, where he met co-workers Marshall Grant and A.W. 'Red' Kernodle. Grant, Kernodle and Perkins began bringing their guitars to work, and would play together when repair business was slow.

When Johnny moved to Memphis after returning from Germany in 1954, Roy Cash introduced him to Grant, Kernodle and Perkins. The four began to get together in the evenings at Perkins' or Grant's home and play songs. It was during this time that they decided to form a band, with Grant moving to an upright bass, Kernodle to a six-string steel guitar, and Perkins buying a Fender Esquire electric guitar Perkins' performance style on the Fender resulted in the band's famous steady, simple "boom-chicka-boom" or "freight train" rhythm.

By 1955, Cash and his bandmates were in the Memphis studio of Sun Records, to audition for owner Sam Phillips. Kernodle was so nervous that he left the session, not wanting to hold back the group. The band presented themselves as the "Tennessee Three", but Phillips suggested that they call themselves Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two. The Tennessee Two became The Tennessee Three when drummer W.S. Holland joined the group in 1960. (The Tennessee Three)

Union Avenue was packed with car dealerships back then. At the time, there was also a Hoehn Chevy lot on Summer Avenue below.

[Image: 8057017891_713827e133_b.jpg]

.

Those trucks on the lot are from the early sixty. I love old cars and trucks.

Yep ...... 1960 Chevrolet Pickup

[Image: 8037337936_b5bb3e7ed9_b.jpg]

That looks like a 4 wheel drive there. I've had my 1958 since 1995. I love them old trucks. 04-cheers
10-05-2012 11:06 PM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #575
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: 7832116430_cd70789084_b.jpg]
1969 ad for Hernando's Hide-A-Way, Memphis, Tenn.

An old ad for this legendary Memphis music spot in a March 1969 "things to do" booklet for guests at area hotels and motels.

"WELCOME OUT-OF-TOWNERS!
Dance to the South's Finest Bands playing at
the only club with TWO BANDS A DAY
-
TEA-DANCE
2:30-5:30 p.m. featuring
LEE ATKINS and the CAPRIS"
-
Evening Dancing
Entertainment, 9 to 1 a.m.
THE FABULOUS NUGGETS
Beer and Set-ups
Club open 12 noon to 1 a.m.
Mon. thru Sat.
-
Hwy 51 S. at Brooks Rd. 398-7496"

[Image: i55498792._szw1280h1280_.jpg.jfif]

Jerry Lee Live - 1991 at Hernandos Hideaway















10-06-2012 10:48 AM
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Cletus Offline
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Post: #576
RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: 7302320424_bf3c195130_o.jpg]

Thos. H. Allen Electric Plant, Memphis Light Gas & Water, Memphis, Tenn. - Circa 1960 postcard

"Allen Fossil Plant is on the Mississippi River five miles southwest of downtown Memphis [on McKellar Lake in Ensley Bottoms]. The plant was built in the 1950s by the Memphis Light, Gas, and Water Division, leased to TVA in 1965, and purchased outright by TVA in 1984." - (TVA web page for the plant)

.
10-07-2012 12:55 AM
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KRB Offline
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Post: #577
RE: Memphis Landmarks
Cletus back in the early 60's we used to go to the steam plant, and shoot snakes with our 22 rifles. Many interesting things down there , including some really tall electrical towers, that some friends of mine climbed, and took the red globe off the blinking light. I was too afraid. In that Hoehn pic, those cars on the lot appear to be late 50's. There is lettering on the marquis that says, 57 demonstrator. We would ride to the steam plant on an old Ducatti motorcycle. Fun days.
(This post was last modified: 10-08-2012 10:36 AM by KRB.)
10-07-2012 09:20 PM
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dan o Offline
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RE: Memphis Landmarks
(10-07-2012 09:20 PM)KRB Wrote:  Cletus back in the early 60's we used to go to the steam plant, and shoot snakes with out 22 rifles.

Same here--small world
10-08-2012 09:03 AM
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Cletus Offline
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RE: Memphis Landmarks
[Image: spirit-of-beale.jpg]

The Spirit of Beale Street


Pinnacle Airlines Dedicates 100th Aircraft in Honor of WWII Bomber

MEMPHIS, TN, Jul. 07, 2004 (MARKET WIRE via COMTEX) -- While researching information on the dedication of its first Canadair Regional Jet "Spirit of the Memphis Belle" in 1999, Pinnacle Airlines (NASDAQ: PNCL) uncovered information about a WWII bomber named the "The Spirit of Beale Street." Details on the aircraft and its fate are sketchy, as no picture of the aircraft revealing the tail number has been found in any public archive. However, the story of the "The Spirit of Beale Street" goes beyond an airplane.

In 1942, when the world was at war, Lt. G.W. Lee and other African-American civic and business leaders in Memphis organized the second war bond drive in the Negro community. This drive raised a remarkable $303,000, the amount needed to build a B-24 Consolidated Liberator bomber. The name chosen for this bomber was the "The Spirit of Beale Street," reflecting the personality and foundation of the community that paid for it.

This initial success provided even more impetus and the dedication and efforts of the African-American community continued. At the center of the city's festivities during a subsequent war bond effort in 1945 was a young man from Memphis named Luke Weathers. In fact, June 25 was called "Capt. Luke Weathers Day." A parade headed down Beale Street and Main, ending in Handy Park where speeches were made and keys to the city presented. A dance followed, with music provided by the Naval Air Station. Weathers graduated from high school in Memphis in 1939. He was determined to enlist in the Army as a cadet. However, a sergeant working in the Union Avenue recruiting office refused his enlistment, telling him that a Negro could not fly. Determined to fight in the war as a pilot, Weathers eventually found his way to the mayor's office and asked him to intercede. At first, the mayor refused, but then read an article on the Tuskegee Airmen that Luke had brought along. Intrigued, the mayor made calls to Washington and soon Luke was on his way to obtaining his dream of fighting as a fighter pilot. "I wanted to fight, but fight with dignity," said Weathers.

After graduating from flight training, Lt. Weathers was deployed to Italy with the famed 332nd fighter group called the Tuskegee Airmen. He spent 14 months flying 71 missions across Europe.

He was shot down during one mission over Greece and escaped with the help of Greek partisans. While in combat, he destroyed seven enemy fighters and was subsequently awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross with seven clusters. When his tour ended, he was promoted to captain and returned to Tuskegee to share his experiences as an instructor. Weathers remained in the military for 23 years.

In total, the African-American community in Memphis raised more money in the war effort than any other similar group, an astounding $1.5 million.

Now, a half century later, Pinnacle Airlines is proud to commemorate the deeds and actions of "the greatest generation" as we dedicate our 100th Canadair Regional Jet the "Spirit of Beale Street." on Thursday, July 8, at 6:30 p.m. CST at the Pinnacle Airlines Memphis Maintenance Hangar. Christening the airplane will be a true American hero from Memphis, Lt. Col. (Ret.) Luke Weathers.

Pinnacle Airlines, Inc., operates under the name Northwest Airlink and provides service to destinations in the United States and Canada. Pinnacle operates an all-jet fleet of Canadair 44 and 50-seat Regional Jets from Northwest hubs at Detroit, Memphis and Minneapolis-St. Paul. Pinnacle Airlines maintains its headquarters in Memphis, Tenn., and employs more than 2,400 People.

Quote:[Image: 1306446491-logo_commercialappeal.jpg]

Lt. Col. Luke Weathers Jr., a Memphis native and Tuskegee airman, laid to rest at Arlington
By Bartholomew Sullivan
Posted January 20, 2012 at 2:54 p.m., updated January 20, 2012 at 11:21 p.m.


[Image: APPCROP_Tuskagee_Airman_Arlington_B_t607.jpg]
Family, friends and admirers of Air Force Lt. Col. Luke Joseph Weathers Jr., one of the original Tuskegee Airmen, attend his burial Friday at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. Weathers, a former Memphian, attended Booker T. Washington High School.

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Lt. Col. Luke Joseph Weathers Jr., an original Tuskegee Airman who a comrade said contributed to the "esprit" of the outfit, was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery Friday with all the Air Force's pomp and pageantry.

Weathers, who died in October in Tucson, Ariz., at the age of 90, was credited with shooting down two Messerschmitt 109s in Italy while escorting a damaged B-24 Liberator bomber in 1944. He returned to a parade in his honor in his hometown of Memphis in 1945 and was given the keys to the city.

"He never really opened up and talked about his war heroics at all," said his namesake son, Luke C. Weathers III, 62, of Millington, at a reception following the burial. "A lot of stuff I learned about what he did and accomplished -- and about the Tuskegee Airmen -- came from outside sources.

"'Did you know your dad did this? Did you know your dad did that?' and I'd go back and, 'Yeah, yeah. I did that.' That's the kind of guy he was."

Coincidentally, Weathers was buried on the day that "Red Tails," a major motion picture about the airmen, opened in theaters nationwide. Weathers III was going to take in the matinee Friday.

The star quarterback of his Booker T. Washington high school football team, Weathers attended Xavier University in New Orleans from 1939 to 1942. Returning home, he made an appointment with Memphis political boss E.H. Crump. Weathers had read in a black newspaper that the Air Force was training African-American aviators in Alabama. Crump at first refused to believe it.

But Crump called President Franklin D. Roosevelt as Weathers stood by and heard Crump tell the president he would be sending one of his constituents to Tuskegee, using the N-word commonly used at the time.

He was commissioned in April 1943 and shipped out to Italy in January 1944.

Pinnacle Airlines vice president Phil Reed said he got to know Weathers when the company decided to name its 100th plane "The Spirit of Beale Street." That was also the name of a war bonds drive that Weathers led, leading to a bomber largely paid for with contributions from Memphis. Weathers ended the war a captain.

Weathers told Reed about a bombing raid he went on in which he was so close to the ground that he noticed he was about to drop his payload on a wedding party.

"He could see the bride looking at him and he pulled up and didn't drop his bombs," Reed said.

"He told me once that he liked being home in Memphis. He believed he could tell when he was home because he would look at the river and say 'this is a city that has its feet in the Mississippi, its souls in the churches and its minds up in the blue sky with God.'"

Col. Charles E. McGee of Bethesda, Md., 91, was in a class behind Weathers at Tuskegee but they ended up in the same 332nd fighter group in Italy, flying P-47s, then P-51s, and were lifelong friends.

"We liked it (the P-51) because it had the altitude, range and speed capability that made it the premier plane for the task that we had," which was escorting bombers, McGee said.

Of Weathers, who became the president of the East Coast chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen when he lived in Washington, McGee said: "I considered him one who developed the esprit and camaraderie because he was always pretty positive. Smile on his face. And looked on the good side of things. Stay positive. Negative doesn't help you."

Weathers married LaVerne Nailling in 1947 in a ceremony photographed by Ernest Withers, who went on to a legendary career as chronicler of the civil rights movement. The couple helped integrate the Catholic church and schools in Memphis, attending St. Therese-Little Flower in 1963. His funeral took place there.

Weathers moved to Tucson to be close to his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, said his wife, Jacqueline, whom he married on Valentine's Day in 1995. His granddaughter Rashida Weathers, 26, a nurses' aide in Arizona, said "he was the epitome of a man to me. ... He taught me to set goals and strive. You know: no boundaries."

Weathers went on to a distinguished career as a Federal Aviation Administration air traffic controller. In 2004, he attended a Pentagon ceremony at which a painting of his fighter, escorting the damaged Liberator over the Po Valley, was unveiled. It was brought to Friday's reception where several red-jacketed airmen recounted their friendship with him.

[Image: 21weathers3_t607.jpeg]
Air Force Col. Charles Cornelisse presents a flag to Jacqueline Weathers, widow of former Tuskegee Airman,
retired Lt. Col. Luke Joseph Weathers Jr., during burial services at Arlington National Cemetery on Friday.


Weathers' flag-draped coffin was brought to the graveside in the shadow of the Pentagon on a caisson drawn by seven white horses led by a color guard. Members of the Air Force, including a brass band, marched behind. More than 100 family members and friends attended and watched a 21-gun salute and a playing of taps.

An earlier four-jet flyover made the "missing man" formation, with the lead pilot, an African-American Air Force Major, Freddie Robinson, in the lead.

-- Bartholomew Sullivan: (202) 408-2726

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10-09-2012 04:14 PM
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TiggerFan Offline
See Ya, Albert
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Post: #580
RE: Memphis Landmarks
(09-28-2012 03:40 PM)Cletus Wrote:  [Image: 7896202856_86e5debed9_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896215818_5148edebc0_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896186944_b4810107b2_o.jpg]

[Image: 7896096834_7b440483b8_b.jpg]


Is that Bennigan's menu from Memphis? I ask for two reasons. When Bennigan's opened the word Tavern was not allowed to be used in Memphis. All of the stuff I still have from working there in the early 80's (it was BOOMING) do not display the word Tavern. Same reason the Camel was called Bup. Pub was illegal too. Third reason: I don't ever remeber quiche being on a late night menu.
(This post was last modified: 10-09-2012 04:31 PM by TiggerFan.)
10-09-2012 04:30 PM
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