Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
Author Message
Bookmark and Share
jedclampett Online
1st String
*

Posts: 1,673
Joined: Jul 2019
Reputation: 77
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #1
Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
The win @ USC provides solid evidence that Aaron McKie has done a remarkable job in his first year as a D1 Head Coach.

His coaching performance has been all the more impressive, given that he's only working with an 11 man roster, with only 9 active players for the USC game, following Damion Moore's recent back injury, as well as Damian Dunn's foot injury.

McKie has found a way to improve Temple's defense (and Temple's average margin of victory) by leaps and bounds, with the team scoring 71.3 ppg on average, while holding their opponents to ~61.3 ppg.

At the same time, he has also found a way to improve Temple's rebounding, with the team now averaging 41.25 rpg, with no rebounding deficit, after having an average rebounding deficit of -5 rpg last season. This, despite the fact that starting Center Moore missed Temple's last two games with a back injury.

Further, Temple's guards, and the team as a whole have done a terrific job at controlling the ball, with a current #5 ranking in the nation with respect to fewest team turnovers.

Players:

Nate Pierre-Louis has been by far the most productive player
on the team, with 20.5 pts, 14 rb, 4.6 ast, 4.6 stl, & 1 blk per 40 min. of play (A+++). His player efficiency rating (PER) to date is an outstanding PER=30.2.*

NOTE: "the highest PER ever achieved over an entire single season in the NBA was 31.84 by Wilt Chamberlain in 1962/63."
*"No other player surpassed 30 until Michael Jordan in 1987/88 with a PER of 31.71. "

.
The remainder of the team's productivity and PER stats are, as listed in order of PER ratings ("A league-average PER is always 15.00"):

Perry 17.9 pts, 6.2 rb, 0.5 ast, 1.5 stl, 1.5 blk per 40 min.(A-) PER=22.8
A Moore 13.2 pts,4.7 rb,3.4 ast,3.1 stl,0.7 blk per40min.(B+) PER=17.2
JPL 18.8 pts, 3.3 rb, 4.9 ast, 4.9 stl, 0 blk per 40 min.(A) PER=16.5
Rose 19.0 pts, 3.8 rb, 2.5 ast, 1.9 stl, 0.3 blk per 40 min.(A-) PER=16.3
D Moore 12.8 pts, 17.6 rb, 1.6 ast, 0 stl, 1.3 blk per 40 min.(A) PER=16.2
Parks 12.0 pts, 10.7 rb, 0 ast, 0 stl, 1.3 blk per 40 min.(B+) PER=13.3
Hamilton 13.6 pts, 10.2 rb, 0 ast, 2 stl, 1.4 blk per 40 min.(A-) PER=9.6
Moorman 5.8 pts, 8.2 rb, 4.1 ast, 0.3 stl, 0.7 blk per 40 min.(B-) PER=9.1
Scott 5.9 pts, 5.3 rb, 1.1 ast, 1.6 stl, 0.5 blk per 40 min.(C+) PER=3.6

PLAYER SUMMARY:

Current Starters (average PER: 16.48) (PG/SG/W: A/A-) (PF/C: B+/B)

NPL is clearly the most outstanding player on the team. If he continues to play at this level, he's likely to be first team all-conference.

Rose has played a key scoring role on the team, being the second leading scorer, with 15 ppg. However, while his FG3% is .400, his FG2% is an abysmal .323, which is a major negative, given that he leads the team with 12.8 FGA/game. His PER confirms that his play to date is definitely subpar for a preseason first team all-conference player.

Alani Moore has improved his game this season slightly, in terms of statistical productivity. However, his FG3% has been subpar to date at only .292, and this is a noteworthy concern because 3/4 of his FGA are 3 point attempts. In addition, he is averaging only 2.5 assists per game, which is very low for a PG (PG Shizz Alston averaged 5 apg).

J.P. Moorman's play, to date, has been the least productive in his collegiate career. His PER (9.1) is well below average, lagging behind the team's two freshmen, and 2nd lowest on the team. His only strong suit has been his 6 rebounds per game, second best on the team to date. His defensive play may have improved, compared to last season, but he has missed 2/3 of his FG attempts, and his FG3% has dropped from .400 to .300 this season.

Justyn Hamilton's play has been a mixed bag, and has been somewhat inconsistent from game to game. His PER (9.6) is below average for a starting D1 player. On the other hand, his rebounding - on a per minute basis - has improved markedly, compared to last season. In addition, his defensive play has improved. If Damion Moore returns to the team in full health (100%), he will most likely return to the starting lineup.


Current Bench (average PER: 14.05) (backcourt: B+/B) (PF/C: A/A-)

De'Vondre Perry has had an outstanding season, thus far, and in terms of PER, statistical productivity, and defensive play has been the second best player on the team, overall. He leads the team with a FG3% of .444 and his FG2% (.588) is second best on the team. Despite playing only 19.5 mpg, he is the 4th leading scorer on the team.

JPL has also gotten off to an astounding start, especially for a freshman. Like his brother NPL, he is one of the best defenders on the team, leading the team with 4.9 steals per 40 min. of play. He leads the team in assists per minute played (4.9 assists per 40 min.), and is the third leading scorer on the team, per minute of play (18.8 pts per 40 min.). Having played only 12.3 mpg to date, his play thus far suggests that he may become a significant impact player who could end up playing perhaps twice as many minutes by the end of the season. His playing time might be limited to some extent, however, because his assist to turnover ratio is only 1.20 (4.1 turnovers per 40 min.).

Damion Moore played well in his first two games on a per minute basis though only playing 12.3 minutes per game (12.8 pts & 17.6 rbs per 40 min.), prior to sustaining a back injury which has thence kept him out of action. His main limitation was leading the team with 4.8 turnovers per 40 minutes played). Nevertheless, the team's prospects this season will be boosted significantly if he can recover and play near 100% fairly soon.

Arashma Parks has played better than many might have expected, since he is coming off a redshirt year, following shoulder surgeries. With 12 pts and 10.7 rbs per 40 minutes of play, he has shown the potential to be an unexpectedly vital contributor in his role a backup Center who can play over 10 minutes per game when needed.

James "Monty" Scott has struggled tremendously to date from a productivity standpoint, bringing up the rear with a PER of only 3.6 to date. Nonetheless, he has played 18.8 mpg, suggesting that Coach McKie has found him to be a trusted reserve guard with the height necessary to play solid perimeter defense against opposing 3 point shooters. He continues to get significant playing time because he averaged 17 ppg prior to transferring to Temple, and may well have the ability to score in double figures once he acclimates to playing with his new teammates and in the McKie system.

============================================

OVERALL SUMMARY:

In many respects, Coach McKie has coached the team to play in a way very reminiscent to the way Temple teams played when John Chaney was Temple's Head Coach:

1) He's found a way to get a supreme effort from some players and a strong effort from most of his players.

2) His team has held opponents to only 61.3 ppg thus far, a number highly similar to Coach Chaney's Temple teams, though not utilizing Chaney's zone defense at this point.

3) His team has scored a similar number of points when compared with Chaney's teams.

However, McKie has opted to play a 9 or 10 man rotation thus far, while Chaney preferred to go with a 7 or 8 man rotation.

In this respect, he has emulated Gregg Marshall's strategy of playing a deep rotation of players, which took WSU to the final four in a season when the Shockers bench was good enough to play a substantial number of minutes.

Playing the full bench has enabled Coach McKie to play a high tempo offense or high pressure defense, when needed, while resting his top 4 players, none of whom has averaged more than 31 mpg thus far.

Another benefit of playing the deepest possible rotation is that the bench players know that they are going to be relied upon to play every game, which tends to keep them highly motivated in practice and can also boost the team's overall motivational level.
(This post was last modified: 11-25-2019 09:18 PM by jedclampett.)
11-25-2019 07:25 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Advertisement


Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 994
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #2
RE: Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
Agree with you that Mckie has done a tremendous job by bringing outathletic defensive prowess of his players.

Do give Assistant Monte Ross a lot of credit as well. as it’s it’s my understanding he’s the architect of Temple’s defense that has reduced opponents scoring by 10-points per game. Assistant Chris Clark has also contributed on both sides of the ball.

With HC Mckie being offensive minded, surprised the offensive half-court sets have declined this season. But, it’s early in the season, and hopefully it will improve.

Temple has been led by Nate Pierre Louis who has been a demon stealing and rebounding as he has, and by scoring in the open court.

Rose has turned a corner by committing less turnovers and starting the season shooting three’s at 40 percent. He needs to shoot less two’s which he shoots poorly (32.3 percent) to justify the number shots he shoots per game.

By far, Dre Perry,has been Temple’s most efficient scorer, by shooting 58.8 percent on two’s, and 44.4 percent on two’s. He needs to play and shoot even more, and sub-in for both Moorman and Rose. As Temple is not going to see it’s scoring rise until it’s more efficient shooters shoot more.

Last season, Temple shot 50 percent on two’s, and 33 percent on three’s.
And opponts shot higher than Temple on two’s at 51.5 percent on two’s, and about the same on three’s. This season Temple has two point shooting percentage has declined dramatically, but by playing a pressure defense, opponents are now shooting a much lower percentage on two’s than Temple is.

While Temple took more three’s than opponents last season, it’s taken
fewer three’s than it’s opponents, but that has started to change in the USC game. Temple and it’s opponents number of three point shots have both declined as well, and the three-point shooting percentages are fairly equal this season.

Overall, Temple is shooting only 45.2 percent on two’s and 29.6 percent on three’s. Both numbers need to rise so that Temple can score more points per game, and Temple doesn’t need to rely solely on it’s pressure defense for wins which has held opponents to shooting 42 percent on two’s and 29.8 percent on three’s.

Temple starting to fast break off of defensive rebounds should increase Temple’s field goal percentage.

Temple needs to put James Scott in a position to get more from him. Playing him some at PG should increase Temple’s assists as he can dish off or score inside, and Temple needs his scoring.

Temple took a small first step by Temple for the first time this season by shooting more three’s than it’s opponents and shooting them at 33 percent on three’s.

Alani has done an outstanding job on both sides of the ball as he’s providing Temple with almost 10-points per game that Temple needs from him. While his three point shooting is 29.2 percent, one can’t ignore he!s getting to the foul line, and shooting 90 percent at the foul line.

One can’t expect more assists from him as Temple’s scorers, both Nate and Rose demand the ball in their hands, and Nate scores mostly off in transition off his own steals, and has not shot the ball well in three’s. And Rose has shot a lot of two’s that he has shot extremely poorly.

Alani gives Temple what you want from a PG who’s team wins by creating opponent turnovers, who turns the ball over very little and doesn’t send opponents to the foul line, as he averages 2.3 steals, per game, commits but 1.3 turnovers per game, and commits but but .5 fouls per game. This numbers must be among the nation’s best. No other player on Temple comes near that.

Josh should not take minutes from Alani, as he fouls 3 times as much as Alani playing 40 percent of Alani’s court time, and would commit more than twice as many turnovers which would hamper an already very fragile offense. His increase in steals wouldn’t offset that.

Josh’s excessive fouling detracts from his excellent defense. But until his starts to shoot more than 41.7 percent on two’s, and 27.3 percent on three’s, his playing time needs to remain limited. Also, he shoots to often, and deprives better shooters on the court from shooting the ball. Josh’s ability shut down a good scoring guard is invaluable.

What Josh needs to do is to work on taking the bad out of his game by shooting less jump shots, and fouling and turning the ball over less.
(This post was last modified: 04-06-2020 11:02 AM by Miggy.)
11-26-2019 05:20 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
jedclampett Online
1st String
*

Posts: 1,673
Joined: Jul 2019
Reputation: 77
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #3
RE: Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
(11-26-2019 05:20 AM)Miggy Wrote:  Agree with you that Mckie has done a tremendous job by bringing outathletic defensive prowess of his players.

Do give Assistant Monte Ross a lot of credit as well. as it’s it’s my understanding he’s the architect of Temple’s defense that has reduced opponents scoring by 10-points per game.

With HC Mckie being offensive minded, surprised the offensive half-court sets have declined has declined this season. But, it’s early in the season, and hopefully it will improve.

By far, Dre Perry,has been Temple’s most efficient scorer, by shooting 58.8 percent on two’s, and 44.4 percent on two’s. He needs to play and shoot even more, and sub-in for both Moorman and Rose. As Temple is not going to see it’s scoring rise until it’s more efficient shooters shoot more.

Last season, Temple shot 50 percent on two’s, and 33 percent on three’s. And opponts shot higher than Temple on two’s at 51.5 percent on two’s, and about the same on three’s. This season Temple has two point shooting percentage has declined dramatically, but by playing a pressure defense, opponents are now shooting a much lower percentage on two’s than Temple is.

Temple needs to put James Scott in a position to get more from him. Playing him some at PG should increase Temple’s assists as he can dish off or score inside, and Temple needs his scoring.

Alani gives Temple what you want from a PG who’s team wins by creating opponent turnovers, who turns the ball over very little and doesn’t send opponents to the foul line, as he averages 2.3 steals, per game, commits but 1.3 turnovers per game, and commits but but .5 fouls per game.

Josh should not take minutes from Alani, as he fouls 3 times as much as Alani playing 40 percent of Alani’s court time, and would commit more than twice as many turnovers which would hamper an already very fragile offense. His increase in steals wouldn’t offset that.

Josh’s excessive fouling detracts from his excellent defense. But until his starts to shoot more than 41.7 percent on two’s, and 27.3 percent on three’s, his playing time needs to remain limited. Also, he shoots to often, and deprives better shooters on the court from shooting the ball. Josh’s ability shut down a good scoring guard is invaluable.

What Josh needs to do is to work on taking the bad out of his game by shooting less jump shots, and fouling and turning the ball over less.

Thanks for the update about Monte Ross playing a key role in improving Temple's defense. Sounds like he may be functioning somewhat like a defensive coordinator.

One of the greatest assets a Head Coach can have is to have a top assistant with solid Head Coaching experience on his staff.
This became especially evident during the John Chaney era. Temple's emergence in the '80s and '90s as a top 30 program, nationally, took place when Coach Chaney had former Niagara HC Jim Maloney as his top assistant and right hand man. After Maloney passed away, his absence was profoundly felt, and Temple hasn't had the benefit of a top assistant with comparable stature since then.

Overall, though, I am still struck by the fact that Temple's scoring and defensive prowess - holding opponents to 60 ppg - is so similar to the way Temple played during their best seasons under John Chaney. Some have remarked that Coach McKie's intensity at courtside bears a certain resemblance to that of his predecessor, in the most complementary sense. No HC could be as fascinating to watch at courtside as JC was, but believe it or not, a dynamic Head Coach can generate attendance all by himself. FD was a dud, by comparison.

.
As far as Temple's offense is concerned, there hasn't yet been a crisis situation, due to the team's strong defensive play, although it's true that Temple will probably need to score 4-5 more ppg, on average, to make their way into the NCAA tournament.

It doesn't seem to be a coaching issue, though. The problem is that two of his three starting guards (Rose & A. Moore) have shot the ball 21 times per game, while hitting only 35.3% and 33.3% of their shots, respectively. In addition, the two have combined for only 4.5 assists per game, while committing 2.8 turnovers per game (low ratio: 1.61).

The loss of Shizz Alston has been keenly felt. Last season's starting back court scored 8.7 more points per game (49.3 ppg) than this season's back court (40.6 ppg); they were also better playmakers, with 9.6 assists, compared to only 8.0 assists this season.


Regarding players:

1) Agree that Perry has been the most improved player on the team. He's contributed as much as Q Rose has, overall, and has shot a much higher FG%, while playing better defense. If this continues, he may be one of the keys to a successful season. He might even be a candidate for conference's most improved player or 6th man of the year.

2) Rose has apparently played better defense than last season, and his overall play may have improved slightly (PER up from 15.3 to 16.3; BPM up from 0.5 to 1.1). However, his FG2% has been truly awful (.323). He may have been under the weather in games 1-3. His only good game, to date, was in game 4 against USC, when he contributed 4 rebounds and 5 assists, for a pleasant change.

3) Agree that Scott ought to be playing some minutes at PG, since JPL has turned the ball as often as he has made an assist and caused a turnover, making the latter a risky prospect at the PG position. Scott probably needs to have the ball in his hands more often in order to do what he's capable of doing with his history as a double-digit scorer.

4) Despite the flaws in his game, I do think JPL should and probably will continue to play at least 12 mpg, on average, [i]since that is the only way he is likely to improve, with experience.[/i] His statistics after 4 games are better than Nate's were at this point in his freshman year, and Nate ended up becoming a major impact player, averaging over 20 mpg late in that season. As you've pointed out, players like him can learn to foul less often. He brings in a uniquely high level of energy and speed when he's on the floor. It's probably a good thing that McKie is playing him, since he would otherwise be steaming with frustration on the bench and might consider transferring. He's a freshman, and he'll learn.

5) When it comes to Alani, he has definitely improved since last year, with an above-average PER of 17.2, compared to a paltry 10.5 last season, and a solid BPM of 6.2, compared to 0.4 last season. While his PT has increased from 15 to 29.5 mpg, his rebounding and steals per game have more than tripled, and his scoring has increased by 139%, from 4.1 to 9.8 ppg. His assist: turnover ratio, now 1.92 has improved since last season, although he has averaged an anemic 2.5 assists per game in his 29.5 minutes of play.

--Due to his mediocre assist numbers, his overall FG% (.333), and B+ level productivity (.6275 positive stats per minute of play), he's nowhere near the player that Shizz Alston (19.7 ppg, 5 apg) was at his position, and that could make all the difference when it comes to the battle for a NCAA at-large opportunity later in the season.

--Thus, in order to increase the prospects of making the NCAA field in March, Coach McKie is probably going to need to alternate playing time more often between Alani and another PG, whether it turns out to be Monty Scott, Damian Dunn, or an improved JPL later in the season, who can contribute more scoring punch and, hopefully, improved play-making at the PG position.
11-26-2019 09:57 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Advertisement


Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 994
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #4
RE: Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
Agree with virtually all your points.

This Temple team is a defensive team, last year’s was an offensive team.

As such, you want defensive players in the backcourt. You have that in Alani, Nate, and Rose, as all can steal the ball, and that leads to easy Temple hoops, and less scoring by opponents. That’s how Temple has managed to win all four games by wide scoring margins.

Alani doesn’t turn the ball over, and has committed but two fouls in four games. Alston couldn’t do those things. Alani not fouling is part of the reason why Temple opponents are not going to the foul line nearly as often as Temple has in three of the last four games. He plays within himself, and he scores.

As for Rose and Nate, their low shooting percentages is because Nate is not hitting three’s, and Rose two’s in half-court sets. Unless both forego or reduce the number of shots each shoots, Temple will remain a bad offensive combination on the court together. It’s the main reason Temple’s half-court offense is such a mess. McKie should be telling Nate to shoot fewer three’s, and Rose fewer two’s. We’ll see if he does going forward. Better shooters need to play and shoot more.

Nate is Temple’s most valuable player and must be on the court for his steals, breakaways, and rebounding. He also can get to the rim in half court sets. Just needs to be more judicious and let others take jumpers. But doesn’t do so because he’s thinks he must score a lot of points.

Rose is the same way, but there’s more hope as he’s hitting the three ball and apoears to be transitioning to shooting more three’s and fewer rwi’s in half-court sets. Thst’s A good thing.

Perry is playing terrific offensively and defensively. He should probably move into the starting line-up as Moorman offensive is not where it should be, and Perry shoots more often, and better than anyone else playing. Perry also steals the ball more than Moorman. Temple needs his firepower in the line-up as Nate and Rose are both struggling in half-court sets. He should also sub-in for Rose, as Perry is a better rebounder.

Hamilton should continue to shoot more. Glad some back-cuts were put in for him in the USC game.

JPL should play 12 mpg because of his on ball defense, ability to steal the ball, and get to the rim. But his excessive fouling and turnovers and inability to hit jumpers is a killer for this team. His hitting two three’s in the USC game was fool!s gold as one went straight up 10 feet off the back iron and then in. His shooting percentages are still terrible over four games.,If McKie would rein him in and limit his shooting jumpers, and he reduces his turnovers and fouling he could play more. At the very least HC McKie should tell him not to shoot jumpers. McKie has shown no signs of doing that.

Agree that Alani and Scott would be a great PG tandem. In the USC game Scott made two long great assists to both Nate and Rose, and a jumper that all helped Temple turn the game around in five minutes of play in the second half as Temple went from a one-point deficit to a nine-point lead.,Unfortunately in the highlight video, we see both Rose and JPL scoring but Scott’s passes are edited out.

It’s up to the HC to get the best out of Scott. Pulling him after he just helped take Temple from a one point deficit to a lead does not foster his confidence.

If Temple is to become a 80-point scoring team and not remain in the low- 70’s, Temple needs Scott’s offense. Playing Scott at PG would force both Nate and Rose to give up the ball more as Scott would control the offense.

If Temple loses games, I think it will be because, Perry and Scott and are not being used properly.
(This post was last modified: 04-06-2020 10:57 AM by Miggy.)
11-26-2019 10:53 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
jedclampett Online
1st String
*

Posts: 1,673
Joined: Jul 2019
Reputation: 77
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #5
RE: Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
Agree that McKie needs to persuade JPL not to shoot jumpers, unless the clock is about to expire, and that someone needs to intervene to improve Rose's judgment. JPL is a bit too headstrong, perhaps, like AI was.

Rose's judgment is really in question, since he keeps making what are obviously low % 2 pt attempts. It's in his best interests to learn better, because this could limit his money earning potential on European pro teams.

For the sake of the team, Coach M needs to get Rose to focus more on playmaking, rebounding, etc., as Rose did in game 4. Otherwise, unlikely NCAA trip this season.

But the backcourt offense problem is not a reduction in Rose's scoring, but the fact that Alani is scoring 8.7 fewer ppg than Alston did. That's why the starting backcourt and team as a whole is scoring so many less pts.

Play-making is crucial in order to create high % shots, and the team as a whole is not making enough assists, due to their PG having only 2.5 apg.

I don't really consider Alani a high D1 quality PG, even though he's improved. His productivity is mediocre, and he's been shooting the ball poorly from 3 pt land.

If Temple can't get better PG play (from Scott or perhaps Dunn), I don't think they can make their way past game 1 in the NCAA tournament.
11-27-2019 10:42 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Miggy Offline
Special Teams
*

Posts: 994
Joined: Aug 2019
Reputation: 0
I Root For: Temple
Location:
Post: #6
RE: Temple basketball summary: Games 1 through 4
[quote='jedclampett' pid='16495845' dateline='1574912522']

Rose has to improve decision-making so he takes good shots. JPL is a bit too headstrong, perhaps, like AI was.

For the sake of the team, Coach Mckie needs to get Rose to focus on rebounding as Rose did in game 4.

Alani is scoring 8.7 fewer ppg than Alston did. That's part of the reason the starting backcourt and team as a whole is scoring less points. He needs to shoot more, and Rose and Nate less as they’re shooting poorly. Other shooters needs to play and shoot more as well.

I do consider a Alani a quality PG, but Rose is given the responsibility to make assists.

If Temple can't get better PG play (from Scott or perhaps Dunn), I don't think they can get to the NCAA tournament.

Do sense that Rose has been told to shoot more three’s than two’s. In USC game, he shot three’s at a good percentage, and by taking less three’s he shot them at a high percentage. What is unknown for me is will he keep jacking them up like he did last year when he was off, or will McKie put a halt to that.

Temple’s shooting percentage didn’t improve last game as Nate was off on two’s and three's. In USC game, Nate shot 3-11 from the field. He needs to shoot a decent percentage on two’s in the Maryland game, and refrain from shooting three’s if he continues to be off.

The outcome of the Maryland game may well depend on Rose and Nate shooting decently or deferring to other Temple players who shoot better to to do so.

If they or other Temple shoot well, Temple won’t have to rely solely on its defense creating lots of forced Maryland turnovers in order for Temple to win. That’s what happened when Temple won its first four games.

The only way Temple’s assists is going to increase is if Scott plays at PG. Temple’s shooting percentages on three’s will also likely increase if Scott starts to shoot more as he’s always been an excellent three-point shooter.

Don’t see Dunn playing PG as he’s not quick.

Perry and Hamilton should shoot more so Temple’s field goal percentages will improve. Moorman should also shoot more if he’s on.
(This post was last modified: 04-07-2020 03:22 PM by Miggy.)
11-28-2019 12:54 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2020 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
We allow third-party companies to serve ads and/or collect certain anonymous information when you visit our web site. These companies may use non-personally identifiable information (e.g., click stream information, browser type, time and date, subject of advertisements clicked or scrolled over) during your visits to this and other Web sites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services likely to be of greater interest to you. These companies typically use a cookie or third party web beacon to collect this information. To learn more about this behavioral advertising practice or to opt-out of this type of advertising, you can visit http://www.networkadvertising.org.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2020 MyBB Group.