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So today Univ of Washington dismissed their star center from the team for (apparently) a positive marijuana sample. My question is how do you assess the legality of taking sanctions against an adult (the player in question is 21) for having traces of a legal herb (any adult in Washington can purchase and use marijuana legally) in their system. There is no competitive advantage to taking marijuana (at least in basketball, maybe in competitive twister), and having a positive piss test simply means you ingested the herb in some form over the past week or two (he wasn't stoned driving the team bus or doing a post game interview).

I guess the athletes are tied to some school athletic department policy, but is that legally binding? Other adult students are not dismissed from school for ingesting a legal substance on their own time. If a school made a policy that it was against athletic department policy to ingest high fructose corn syrup because it may affect athletic performance and conditioning, would that be legal? Can the NCAA legally bar adult athletes from Colorado and Washington states from the NCAA tourney (the Mitch McGary rule) simply because they have a trace of a legal non performance enhancing substance in their blood?
(01-27-2015 02:08 AM)pono Wrote: [ -> ]So today Univ of Washington dismissed their star center from the team for (apparently) a positive marijuana sample. My question is how do you assess the legality of taking sanctions against an adult (the player in question is 21) for having traces of a legal herb (any adult in Washington can purchase and use marijuana legally) in their system. There is no competitive advantage to taking marijuana (at least in basketball, maybe in competitive twister), and having a positive piss test simply means you ingested the herb in some form over the past week or two (he wasn't stoned driving the team bus or doing a post game interview).

I guess the athletes are tied to some school athletic department policy, but is that legally binding? Other adult students are not dismissed from school for ingesting a legal substance on their own time. If a school made a policy that it was against athletic department policy to ingest high fructose corn syrup because it may affect athletic performance and conditioning, would that be legal? Can the NCAA legally bar adult athletes from Colorado and Washington states from the NCAA tourney (the Mitch McGary rule) simply because they have a trace of a legal non performance enhancing substance in their blood?

The ability to help block pain certainly is performance enhancing. Too much coffee can get you banned.
Pono... your point is well stated and logical. I don't smoke pot but I am also basically OK with legalization with some limits. Perhaps the dude was a " &^#(!#% -up " and this was a means to dismiss him or he forgot to show-up for practice a few too many times. I don't know all the facts but on the surface it does seem a bit disingenuous.

Go Rockets!!!!!!!!
a lot of issues involved here. Not only the players rights within his state to ingest marijuana, but also that he's 21. I wonder how things will be handled under NCAA and league drug policies as these cover students in states that POT isn't legal. From a league wide stand point are these rules enforceable?
I've been wondering how situations like this would play out, given the number of states that have legalized pot over the past few years. How will the professional leagues that have teams in WA, CO, etc...handle the issue?
Btw, the brain is not neurologically mature until the mid to later 20's, particularly in the areas where emotion and thought are integrated.
Marijuana does interfere with that development. If teams want to have policies regarding alcohol and drugs that go beyond statutes, be my guest.
Don't sign with a team like BYU if you don't agree with the policies they enforce.
It's probably still banned by the NCAA until it gets legalized in other states, because think of the recruiting advantage Washington and Colorado could have if their players could smoke.
(01-27-2015 10:44 AM)nickthequick Wrote: [ -> ]It's probably still banned by the NCAA until it gets legalized in other states, because think of the recruiting advantage Washington and Colorado could have if their players could smoke.


They would have their pick of players. Light'em up Boys, and a free education too!!!
(01-27-2015 02:08 AM)pono Wrote: [ -> ]So today Univ of Washington dismissed their star center from the team for (apparently) a positive marijuana sample. My question is how do you assess the legality of taking sanctions against an adult (the player in question is 21) for having traces of a legal herb (any adult in Washington can purchase and use marijuana legally) in their system. There is no competitive advantage to taking marijuana (at least in basketball, maybe in competitive twister), and having a positive piss test simply means you ingested the herb in some form over the past week or two (he wasn't stoned driving the team bus or doing a post game interview).

I guess the athletes are tied to some school athletic department policy, but is that legally binding? Other adult students are not dismissed from school for ingesting a legal substance on their own time. If a school made a policy that it was against athletic department policy to ingest high fructose corn syrup because it may affect athletic performance and conditioning, would that be legal? Can the NCAA legally bar adult athletes from Colorado and Washington states from the NCAA tourney (the Mitch McGary rule) simply because they have a trace of a legal non performance enhancing substance in their blood?

The head coach may have set forth his own set of team rules. Drinking and smoking more than likely are against team rules. If you don't like it go play somewhere else. Being part of a D1 Program is a privilege, not a right.
good replies, it's been an open secret that the weed friendly culture at oregon has been a recruiting asset. depends on the person's response to thc whether it impacts their play. for some people it is a good mild sleep aid and pain reliever. for others it keeps them up or is often used with alcohol to get really messed up. oregon had an excellent wr suspended for the championship game for a positive test.

the player in question at UW has a history of suspensions related to pot, but there could be other issues with him too. my question is more if the rights of adult student athletes to responsibly do things like have a couple beers, smoke a joint, etc... can legally be trumped by an ncaa or school policy. the ncaa can have it's policies, sure, but to what extent can it impose them on legal behavior?
The definition of "legal" in this case is still kinda tenuous. Although the state says it is legal, the federal government still considers pot use illegal - in all states. They haven't stepped in to enforce that yet, but have made it clear that, for example, federal employees can still be disciplined or even fired for smoking marijuana on their own time, even is states where it is "legal".

But, whether it is illegal or not may not even be relevant. In many states, companies are free to fire people who test positive for tobacco, even if they are doing that on their own time. Alcohol use can get you in trouble too, and both of those are completely legal. Just because something is legal to do on your own time doesn't necessarily mean that a corporations or other entities has to hire you or allow you to participate if you chose to partake. There isn't any law about not discriminating against pot users, as far as I know.
So let's keep it illegal in Ohio and schedule home games with teams from states where it's legal. When they arrive for the game we require that they take a drug test, then have every guy who fails arrested! 03-woohoo
(01-27-2015 01:12 PM)BDV27 Wrote: [ -> ]The head coach may have set forth his own set of team rules. Drinking and smoking more than likely are against team rules. If you don't like it go play somewhere else. Being part of a D1 Program is a privilege, not a right.

I was thinking the very same thing. When I was an undergrad in the early 1960's a time when almost everybody in college I knew smoked cigarettes EXCEPT members of the football team (and probably some other athletes as well but the only athletes I personally knew were a few football players) because not smoking was part of their conditioning requirements and it was strictly against team rules and they could get kicked off the team for smoking cigarettes---and today I would think that a similar ban against smoking anything would still apply--it is not a question of legality or morality, it is a question of physical conditioning.
yeah, I agree that smoking is not a good thing for athletic conditioning but a lot of legal marijuana use is edibles, oils and vaporizers which don't involve smoke or toxicity but get thc into people's bloodstreams.

and while athletes are privileged to play at this level with it's comforts and benefits, they also put in a tremendous amount of time and effort (and in sports like football risk serious and chronic injury and conditions). but many college kids are privileged. is an athlete who handles their school work well ands is a contributor on their team more privileged than the mediocre student with the good SAT score whose parents are putting him through school while he spends half his time stoned?
Well, athletic leagues play in more than one state...sometimes.

I always wanted to sign for the team in the state anabolic steroids were legal. And compete in all the states that banned them.
A lot of posters here seem to have waaaaay too much knowledge about smoking pot..........Must have been panicking when they took twinkies off the shelves for awhile.
(01-30-2015 10:28 PM)MotoRocket Wrote: [ -> ]A lot of posters here seem to have waaaaay too much knowledge about smoking pot..........Must have been panicking when they took twinkies off the shelves for awhile.

03-lmfao
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