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Killing the BIG XII
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JRsec Offline
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Post: #111
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(Yesterday 10:41 AM)bullet Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 05:21 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 04:07 PM)quo vadis Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 12:24 PM)SMUmustangs Wrote:  WOULD EVERY POSTER ON THIS BOARD PLEASE READ THESE TWO POSTS BY JRsec.

They explain the realignment situation EXACTLY as it is.

I disagree somewhat with JR's characterization of the market. Thirty-five years ago, college football was not a "quaint sleepy regional thing" that only people on the campuses cared about, and which the 1984 supreme court case changed. I remember, and in 1983, Nebraska vs Miami was every bit as "big" in a cultural-sports impact sense as was Georgia vs Alabama this year, and in 1973, Ohio State vs Michigan was as well. I was living in Washington DC then, and believe me, those games were huge where i was back then, even though I was watching from far, far away from those schools.

IOW's, for the entirety of my life, major college football has been a MAJOR sport, up there with the other major sports. The 1984 court cases changed how college football was televised and who would benefit from it, but it did not change the fundamental popularity of the sport.

Another problem with the "1984 court genie" argument is that the same thing has happened in all major sports. E.g., in 1985, the average NFL franchise was worth $75 million. Today, it is $2.34 Billion, even though the NFL was every bit as important and "big" in a cultural landscape sense in 1985 as it is today. And no, inflation isn't a big factor here - that 1985 figure is $175m in today's dollars, still way, way less than today.

Even in so called "dying" sports, money is far bigger. E.g., in the USA, tennis is arguably not as popular in 2017, and it doesn't have the same cultural profile as it did in 1979, when Johnny Mac and Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors ruled the roost. But in 1979, the US Open champion got a check for $39,000 ($120,000 in today's dollars). Last year, the champ got $3.7 million. MLB franchise average worth was $100m in 1992, $1.6 Billion last year.

So obviously, other factors than just the 1984 supreme court case are driving the big money trains in college football.

That's okay Quo. I don't disagree that there was big time football being played in 1983. But the way championships were decided through the polls, the way the Heisman was not yet a TV event for ESPN to twist into some grotesque weekly evaluation of did so and so's team win the big game, the way ticket prices and donations were compared to today, when whole families could afford a game. Back then it was a sleepy little conference controlled and run event with each conference having their own unique events and pageantry. So by comparison to today when IMG has taken over the sound system in your stadium and your fans are given the exact same bumper music and stadium anthems as every other venue in America, it was quaint, sleepy, and quite beautiful.

What ESPN has done was not possible without OU/UGA vs the NCAA. It was the pivotal moment that changed our world, even though at the time how much change was to come was not evident.

So take my descriptors with the overstatement I intended. I wanted to draw a stark comparison between what college football was then, and what it has become today. You know in the days before any of us ever heard about market footprints. And I might add in the days when a conference might have added a neighbor without relying solely on a financial evaluation. You know in the days "before the dark times, before the Empire".

Price increases have taken off recently. I have a 1994 ticket for UT. $17. And you could get season tickets for that price with guaranteed OU tickets and no donation required. Now its variable pricing, about 5 times that high with sizable donations required. In the SEC usually the face price of the tickets is lower, but the required donations are higher.

Yeah, now the SEC games and OOC P5's are around $80 each, the G5 games around $65, and the FCS (if we have one) around $55. But the donations depending upon where one sits can go from $800-$100,000.

I think the pricing when I was in school was around $10 for a non student ticket and student tickets were $2 each and yes we still dressed up for the games.
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quo vadis Offline
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Post: #112
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(Yesterday 11:20 AM)JHS55 Wrote:  Ok, so who is older , quo or jrsec ? Y’all sound like your older than me, Iam 54

Nope, I'm 53. 04-cheers
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Erictelevision Online
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Post: #113
RE: Killing the BIG XII
I'm 39 (40 in 6 weeks). I'll get off your lawn.
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firmbizzle Offline
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Post: #114
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(Yesterday 12:54 PM)Erictelevision Wrote:  I'm 39 (40 in 6 weeks). I'll get off your lawn.

Dang kids! 03-banghead
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Post: #115
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(01-15-2018 08:38 AM)BadgerMJ Wrote:  While I don't consider Twitter to be a solid "source", it often delivers food for thought nuggets.

I saw one where the poster asked the question "where are schools like OU & TX more valuable to the networks, in the XII or somewhere else?"

The reason I still believe the networks will drive the next round of realignment is that several conferences made out REALLY WELL at the last contract negotiations. The SEC & B1G made that kind of money because the networks (ESPN/Fox) thought they were good investments. When the next round comes up in 4-5 years, the networks and the conferences will have to decide if expansion will be valuable on BOTH sides, meaning is there enough value added in taking an OU to increase the money they get and the ratings they get.

The pie is only so big. The SEC & B1G consume that most of the pie is it appears that ESPN is willing to allow the ACC to take it's share as well. Since the PAC is pretty much an island unto itself, that leaves the XII as the proverbial odd man out. I still believe when the fat lady is singing, OU and TX (and probably KU) will be calling somewhere else home.

The pie is not limited. Only the number of TV slots is limited. Its why they are doing TH and F night games-to increase the number of TV slots. But if they can get more people watching in the existing slots, both sides can make more money. That's the reason for a lot of the rules tweaks and for the endless TV commercials.
Today 09:40 AM
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Post: #116
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(Yesterday 12:17 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:41 AM)bullet Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 05:21 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 04:07 PM)quo vadis Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 12:24 PM)SMUmustangs Wrote:  WOULD EVERY POSTER ON THIS BOARD PLEASE READ THESE TWO POSTS BY JRsec.

They explain the realignment situation EXACTLY as it is.

I disagree somewhat with JR's characterization of the market. Thirty-five years ago, college football was not a "quaint sleepy regional thing" that only people on the campuses cared about, and which the 1984 supreme court case changed. I remember, and in 1983, Nebraska vs Miami was every bit as "big" in a cultural-sports impact sense as was Georgia vs Alabama this year, and in 1973, Ohio State vs Michigan was as well. I was living in Washington DC then, and believe me, those games were huge where i was back then, even though I was watching from far, far away from those schools.

IOW's, for the entirety of my life, major college football has been a MAJOR sport, up there with the other major sports. The 1984 court cases changed how college football was televised and who would benefit from it, but it did not change the fundamental popularity of the sport.

Another problem with the "1984 court genie" argument is that the same thing has happened in all major sports. E.g., in 1985, the average NFL franchise was worth $75 million. Today, it is $2.34 Billion, even though the NFL was every bit as important and "big" in a cultural landscape sense in 1985 as it is today. And no, inflation isn't a big factor here - that 1985 figure is $175m in today's dollars, still way, way less than today.

Even in so called "dying" sports, money is far bigger. E.g., in the USA, tennis is arguably not as popular in 2017, and it doesn't have the same cultural profile as it did in 1979, when Johnny Mac and Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors ruled the roost. But in 1979, the US Open champion got a check for $39,000 ($120,000 in today's dollars). Last year, the champ got $3.7 million. MLB franchise average worth was $100m in 1992, $1.6 Billion last year.

So obviously, other factors than just the 1984 supreme court case are driving the big money trains in college football.

That's okay Quo. I don't disagree that there was big time football being played in 1983. But the way championships were decided through the polls, the way the Heisman was not yet a TV event for ESPN to twist into some grotesque weekly evaluation of did so and so's team win the big game, the way ticket prices and donations were compared to today, when whole families could afford a game. Back then it was a sleepy little conference controlled and run event with each conference having their own unique events and pageantry. So by comparison to today when IMG has taken over the sound system in your stadium and your fans are given the exact same bumper music and stadium anthems as every other venue in America, it was quaint, sleepy, and quite beautiful.

What ESPN has done was not possible without OU/UGA vs the NCAA. It was the pivotal moment that changed our world, even though at the time how much change was to come was not evident.

So take my descriptors with the overstatement I intended. I wanted to draw a stark comparison between what college football was then, and what it has become today. You know in the days before any of us ever heard about market footprints. And I might add in the days when a conference might have added a neighbor without relying solely on a financial evaluation. You know in the days "before the dark times, before the Empire".

Price increases have taken off recently. I have a 1994 ticket for UT. $17. And you could get season tickets for that price with guaranteed OU tickets and no donation required. Now its variable pricing, about 5 times that high with sizable donations required. In the SEC usually the face price of the tickets is lower, but the required donations are higher.

Yeah, now the SEC games and OOC P5's are around $80 each, the G5 games around $65, and the FCS (if we have one) around $55. But the donations depending upon where one sits can go from $800-$100,000.

I think the pricing when I was in school was around $10 for a non student ticket and student tickets were $2 each and yes we still dressed up for the games.

Don't remember what regular tickets cost when I went to school, but the student tickets were $2. Texas was pretty casual. But my wife who was at UGA in the Herschel era tells me they all dressed up no matter how hot it was. The girls are much more casual at UGA now, although they do wear the colors, usually a casual little black dress.
Today 09:50 AM
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BadgerMJ Offline
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Post: #117
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(Today 09:40 AM)bullet Wrote:  
(01-15-2018 08:38 AM)BadgerMJ Wrote:  While I don't consider Twitter to be a solid "source", it often delivers food for thought nuggets.

I saw one where the poster asked the question "where are schools like OU & TX more valuable to the networks, in the XII or somewhere else?"

The reason I still believe the networks will drive the next round of realignment is that several conferences made out REALLY WELL at the last contract negotiations. The SEC & B1G made that kind of money because the networks (ESPN/Fox) thought they were good investments. When the next round comes up in 4-5 years, the networks and the conferences will have to decide if expansion will be valuable on BOTH sides, meaning is there enough value added in taking an OU to increase the money they get and the ratings they get.

The pie is only so big. The SEC & B1G consume that most of the pie is it appears that ESPN is willing to allow the ACC to take it's share as well. Since the PAC is pretty much an island unto itself, that leaves the XII as the proverbial odd man out. I still believe when the fat lady is singing, OU and TX (and probably KU) will be calling somewhere else home.

The pie is not limited. Only the number of TV slots is limited. Its why they are doing TH and F night games-to increase the number of TV slots. But if they can get more people watching in the existing slots, both sides can make more money. That's the reason for a lot of the rules tweaks and for the endless TV commercials.

It's limited in the fact that the networks (Fox & ESPN) have a dollar amount in mind to budget for conference contracts.

IF they can manage to find ways to increase viewership and/or increase commercial revenue, they would adjust that budgeted amount.

Even if they do, it's not an unlimited dollar amount.

Ratings have shown that the numbers are in favor of the SEC & B1G and I'd guess that the contract $$$ will reflect that.

Those networks and conferences might come to realize that they can have the best of both worlds by increasing viewership/ratings and $$$ by simply adding schools instead of negotiating more contracts.
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JRsec Offline
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Post: #118
RE: Killing the BIG XII
(Today 09:50 AM)bullet Wrote:  
(Yesterday 12:17 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(Yesterday 10:41 AM)bullet Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 05:21 PM)JRsec Wrote:  
(01-16-2018 04:07 PM)quo vadis Wrote:  I disagree somewhat with JR's characterization of the market. Thirty-five years ago, college football was not a "quaint sleepy regional thing" that only people on the campuses cared about, and which the 1984 supreme court case changed. I remember, and in 1983, Nebraska vs Miami was every bit as "big" in a cultural-sports impact sense as was Georgia vs Alabama this year, and in 1973, Ohio State vs Michigan was as well. I was living in Washington DC then, and believe me, those games were huge where i was back then, even though I was watching from far, far away from those schools.

IOW's, for the entirety of my life, major college football has been a MAJOR sport, up there with the other major sports. The 1984 court cases changed how college football was televised and who would benefit from it, but it did not change the fundamental popularity of the sport.

Another problem with the "1984 court genie" argument is that the same thing has happened in all major sports. E.g., in 1985, the average NFL franchise was worth $75 million. Today, it is $2.34 Billion, even though the NFL was every bit as important and "big" in a cultural landscape sense in 1985 as it is today. And no, inflation isn't a big factor here - that 1985 figure is $175m in today's dollars, still way, way less than today.

Even in so called "dying" sports, money is far bigger. E.g., in the USA, tennis is arguably not as popular in 2017, and it doesn't have the same cultural profile as it did in 1979, when Johnny Mac and Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors ruled the roost. But in 1979, the US Open champion got a check for $39,000 ($120,000 in today's dollars). Last year, the champ got $3.7 million. MLB franchise average worth was $100m in 1992, $1.6 Billion last year.

So obviously, other factors than just the 1984 supreme court case are driving the big money trains in college football.

That's okay Quo. I don't disagree that there was big time football being played in 1983. But the way championships were decided through the polls, the way the Heisman was not yet a TV event for ESPN to twist into some grotesque weekly evaluation of did so and so's team win the big game, the way ticket prices and donations were compared to today, when whole families could afford a game. Back then it was a sleepy little conference controlled and run event with each conference having their own unique events and pageantry. So by comparison to today when IMG has taken over the sound system in your stadium and your fans are given the exact same bumper music and stadium anthems as every other venue in America, it was quaint, sleepy, and quite beautiful.

What ESPN has done was not possible without OU/UGA vs the NCAA. It was the pivotal moment that changed our world, even though at the time how much change was to come was not evident.

So take my descriptors with the overstatement I intended. I wanted to draw a stark comparison between what college football was then, and what it has become today. You know in the days before any of us ever heard about market footprints. And I might add in the days when a conference might have added a neighbor without relying solely on a financial evaluation. You know in the days "before the dark times, before the Empire".

Price increases have taken off recently. I have a 1994 ticket for UT. $17. And you could get season tickets for that price with guaranteed OU tickets and no donation required. Now its variable pricing, about 5 times that high with sizable donations required. In the SEC usually the face price of the tickets is lower, but the required donations are higher.

Yeah, now the SEC games and OOC P5's are around $80 each, the G5 games around $65, and the FCS (if we have one) around $55. But the donations depending upon where one sits can go from $800-$100,000.

I think the pricing when I was in school was around $10 for a non student ticket and student tickets were $2 each and yes we still dressed up for the games.

Don't remember what regular tickets cost when I went to school, but the student tickets were $2. Texas was pretty casual. But my wife who was at UGA in the Herschel era tells me they all dressed up no matter how hot it was. The girls are much more casual at UGA now, although they do wear the colors, usually a casual little black dress.

Yeah, I think the student tickets were the last ones to go up. I was well into my donation for season ticket years by the time Herschel and Bo played. Back in those days we were headed to the away games too if they didn't conflict with work. I think the student tickets were still $2 almost into the 90's. It's been a long time since I checked but somebody told me a few years ago that they are $10 each now. I don't know if that is true, but that is about the same 5 x rate you mentioned for regular tickets.
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