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If Sweden and Germany were US states they would be among the poorest
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WKUYG Away
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Post: #11
RE: If Sweden and Germany were US states they would be among the poorest
I didn't read the article so maybe this was touched on but I believe the work week/hours are a lot less in Sweden, Germany and Europe. Just a guess on my part but I bet there are a lot less two income families over there to go along with less work hours?
(This post was last modified: 07-17-2017 12:45 AM by WKUYG.)
07-17-2017 12:38 AM
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SuperFlyBCat Offline
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Post: #12
RE: If Sweden and Germany were US states they would be among the poorest
(07-16-2017 10:06 PM)oliveandblue Wrote:  
(07-16-2017 10:00 PM)miko33 Wrote:  One thing not shown is what Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, UK, etc are getting in return for the high tax burden. For example, medical care can still be quite expensive for any U.S. resident who may have moderate health issues vs citizens of the European countries that have universal healthcare. I'm not commenting on the quality of the care - just cost. Despite that, anyone who has traveled to Europe over the past few years have a pretty good idea that the standard of living for most typical Europeans is lower than for most Americans. We have larger houses, typically more land for our houses and generally access to cars with better performance and features. Bear in mind that most Europeans aren't going to have access to high performance vehicles like Ferrari's, Porsches and Jaguars. If they own cars, it's most likely to be a Peugeot, Skoda or a small name brand hatchback with a 1.5L engine.

America truly is a country for the automobile. We have roads and cities for all types of sporty cars.

As an architect, it's amazing to see how we build relative to Europeans, and how much of our built environment the automobile really occupies.

Depends on where you live. Mercedes, BMW, Audi all sell more autos in Europe than the USA by a 2 to 1 margin. There are roads and highways all over Europe and yes people driving autos.
07-17-2017 07:19 AM
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TigerBlue4Ever Offline
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Post: #13
RE: If Sweden and Germany were US states they would be among the poorest
(07-17-2017 12:38 AM)WKUYG Wrote:  I didn't read the article so maybe this was touched on but I believe the work week/hours are a lot less in Sweden, Germany and Europe. Just a guess on my part but I bet there are a lot less two income families over there to go along with less work hours?

I believe Sweden has a 35 hour work week.
07-17-2017 07:27 AM
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Dragonlair2.0 Offline
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Post: #14
If Sweden and Germany were US states they would be among the poorest
(07-16-2017 10:00 PM)miko33 Wrote:  One thing not shown is what Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, UK, etc are getting in return for the high tax burden. For example, medical care can still be quite expensive for any U.S. resident who may have moderate health issues vs citizens of the European countries that have universal healthcare. I'm not commenting on the quality of the care - just cost. Despite that, anyone who has traveled to Europe over the past few years have a pretty good idea that the standard of living for most typical Europeans is lower than for most Americans. We have larger houses, typically more land for our houses and generally access to cars with better performance and features. Bear in mind that most Europeans aren't going to have access to high performance vehicles like Ferrari's, Porsches and Jaguars. If they own cars, it's most likely to be a Peugeot, Skoda or a small name brand hatchback with a 1.5L engine.

[quote]the left of the red column are other OECD countries, and to the right of the red bar are individual US states. These national-level comparisons take into account taxes, and include social benefits (e.g., "welfare" and state-subsidized health care) as income. Purchasing power is adjusted to take differences in the cost of living in different countries into account. [\quote]

They took into account social benefits. At least that's how o read this statement
07-17-2017 07:31 AM
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