Hello There, Guest! (LoginRegister)

Post Reply 
Michigan player calls out B1G Commish $20 Million Bonus...
Author Message
The Cutter of Bish Offline
All American
*

Posts: 2,784
Joined: Mar 2013
Reputation: 73
I Root For: the little guy
Location:
Post: #51
RE: Michigan player calls out B1G Commish $20 Million Bonus...
(05-14-2017 05:38 PM)nzmorange Wrote:  He didn't bring in $22 million last year, which is a HUGE problem, given that the B1G member are almost entirely public, and many of the B1G states are broke. He's taking money from Midwestern taxpayers.

Yeah. He has managed to bring in more media money to his schools, but it's not like the programs are brining that in. Operational costs are way up. It's not like cfb has finally made it and figured out a way to make money for its institutions. Not even close. It's just better subsidized, and even that is debatable.

But, let the states figure this stuff out. Football is a financial blackhole. Money goes in and rarely does it come out...if states want their funds going to help support these programs, their staffs, the scholarships for these athletes, and the bonuses for the conferences they affiliate, let them. State reps need to be constantly reminded of this...and they are...it just doesn't seem to resonate or find a good, clean ear.
05-15-2017 12:38 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Bigdog731 Offline
Water Engineer
*

Posts: 30
Joined: Mar 2017
Reputation: 12
I Root For: Tigers
Location:
Post: #52
RE: Michigan player calls out B1G Commish $20 Million Bonus...
Just a little context in regards to the SB Nation study....You can bet the farm this "study" is probably not worth the effort that went into it. The author is a young whipper snapper not long out of college....His co-author is someone nothing more than and academic intellectual type (a tenured associate professor) not and insider in terms of sports business, not a GM for a pro team, not a agent, not a player....basically nothing. This tenured dude got his chops at none other than Madison, WI and Berkley, CA....while these two are certainly academic heavyweights it can also be said with 100$ certainty they are also drivers of far far far far far leftizm....it's highly unlikely the brains behind this STUDY escaped the entire Madison/Berkley experience....most likely he embraced it. I only point this out for context because the STUDY is probably not a fair assessment at all. In fact it appears to be BS far as I can tell....it certainly doesn't present an opposing view or much of one. It's a one sided argument is all it is just like most things I suppose.

Anyway what exactly is a national recruiting director analysis for SBNation? where is his rankings? how much does he make doing this? who are his contacts? how old is he? how many head coaches does he know? how many scout does he interact with? Parts of this study a 5 year old could have written of understand..you know like you win more with better players...WOW, really! so this uber smart Bergman dude , the economist.....these are not the kind of dudes you see running fortune 500 companies or would trust running a company even on a far smaller scale. These are intellectuals who know all the answers yet have no real world experience on the very things they teach.....would you take a young Fred Smith or a young Bergman dude to start up FED EX. Would you trust a Bergman dude's financial analyst and forecast (sports or otherwise) or a Fred Smith types...just saying haha I'm just saying this study more or less lacks credibility because its not fair or has the pro and con side.

The two central characters of the STUDY ...Stephen A. Bergman and Trevon D. Logan, of Ohio State. You can bet Logan would never in a million years take the other side on this issue. So his basic fairness , to me anyway, comes into question. Heck, its said at least in regards to this STUDY Logan is Bergman's mentor.






Bud Elliott
National Recruiting Director He's a Florida native and an attorney
Bud Elliott is the National Recruiting Analyst & Editor for SBNation.com. He's a Florida native and an attorney. He holds degrees from Alabama and Florida State, both of which have fan bases that are obsessed with recruiting.



As SB Nation’s college football recruiting guru, I’ve long trumpeted the value of recruiting elite players and of recruiting rankings HUH LOL

But I am not a data scientist or a Ph.D. So when I was passed a study titled “The Effect of Recruit Quality on College Football Team Performance,” in the Journal of Sports Economics, I was very excited to talk with authors Stephen A. Bergman and Trevon D. Logan, of Ohio State.
That conversation happened in the SB Nation College Football Recruiting Podcast.
Bergman and I chatted for 30 minutes about the study, and the potential future implications in a changing recruiting world.
The study can be found here (.pdf).
Previous studies have examined the benefits of highly rated recruiting classes in college football and have found that higher rated recruiting classes are related to greater success on –the- field. Teams with strong traditions usually recruit better players and this implies that the relationship between recruit quality and on the field success may be over-stated. We analyze the effect of recruit quality on team performance with school fixed effects. Using data collected from recruiting services, we obtain the number of individual recruits by ex ante star rating for every Football Bowl Division (FBS) school for the years 2002 to 2012.

We also record team performance in the regular season, conference success and post season during the same time period. We find that controlling for between school heterogeneity lowers the estimated effect of recruit quality on wins, but the effect is still statistically and economically significant. In addition, we find that recruit quality is an important determinant for the probability of an appearance in the most lucrative bowl games. Our estimates imply that a 5-star recruit is worth more than $150,000 in expected BCS bowl proceeds to an individual school.

"We expected to see diminished effects after running the regressions, but we found that recruiting is still statistically significant, and has profound effects on a school-by-school basis," Bergman said.
And the $150,000 number could actually be much higher.
"Our research suggests some of these five-star recruits could be worth more than $500,000 a year to a program," Bergman said, accounting for the Playoff era’s increased television revenues.
One of the things that surprised me: Recruiting is probably even more important than I, a recruiting analyst, thought. And within that, Bergman believes the gap in quality is actually larger between three- and four-stars than it is between four- and five-stars.
Mostly, I am happy that someone has used science to further prove that #StarsMatter.




Alumni Feature: Stephen Bergman

Getting Published: An Undergraduate’s Hard Work Pays Off
“I’m honored and I’m gratified,” said Bergman on hearing the news. “I’m not sure it’s really hit me yet – maybe when I see it in print.”
In 2013, when Bergman was an undergraduate majoring in economics, he submitted a research paper, “The Effect of Recruit Quality on College Football Team Performance,” to theJournal of Sports Economics, a top peer-reviewed journal in the field. His faculty advisor and mentor throughout the research and writing process was Trevon Logan, associate professor of economics. The article was published in the August 2014 online version of the journal.
“It is rare for undergraduates to stick to long term research projects and extremely rare for them to get published in a peer-reviewed journal,” said Logan.
When Bergman was an undergraduate majoring in economics, he met Logan at a meeting of Ohio State’s Undergraduate Economic Society. Logan was presenting his work on betting lines predicting college football outcomes. Bergman was interested in whether better recruits resulted in better on-the-field success and, if so, how to measure the relationship.
Logan hired Bergman to work on his betting and finance project. At the same time, he challenged Bergman to consider researching a better way to test for the effect of recruits on performance.”
“I was new to economic research and was eager to learn the proper way to conduct a research project,” said Bergman. “Professor Logan and I met every week. He broke the project down into smaller parts to be tackled, piece by piece and helped me organize the method for collecting the data.”



“In layman’s terms, Ohio State does better every year than, say, Indiana because they always recruit better players than Indiana,” explained Bergman.
But Bergman also found that when Ohio State (or any other school) recruits better players than they normally do, the effect is very big. For example, when the Buckeyes land a rare five-star recruit they significantly increase the number of wins that year—and five star players have a larger effect on wins, conference championships and BCS bowl wins than four star recruits or any other recruits.
Logan encouraged him to consider publishing his findings.




Author Biographies
Stephen A. Bergman is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University, where he majored in economics. This is his first publication.
Trevon D. Logan is a professor of economics at The Ohio State University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.




Trevon D. Logan is the Hazel C. Youngberg Trustees Distinguished Professor in the Department of Economics at The Ohio State University and is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is the youngest-ever president of the National Economics Association,[1] and was awarded the 2014 Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching.[2] His research mainly focuses on economic history, including studies of African American migration, economic analysis of illegal markets, the economics of marriage transfers, and measures of historical living standards.
Life[edit]
Logan comes from an African-American family with roots in the sharecropping economy of the southern United States.[3] He received his B.S. in economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1999 as a Chancellor's Scholar, M.A. degrees in economics and demography from the University of California, Berkeley in 2003, and his PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley in 2004. He was awarded tenure as a professor of economics at the age of 32.[1] He has held visiting positions at Princeton University's Center for Health and Well-Being and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan. Outside of his university positions, he serves on the board of a network of charter schools, and is active in Columbus-area HIV prevention organizations.[1]


March 3, 2015
UW Major: Economics
Age: 36 | Columbus, Ohio
Associate professor of economics at The Ohio State University and president of the National Economic Association
Logan’s work is also attracting attention far beyond his campus. He was invited to the White House to advise senior officials on how to improve the measures of living standards for low-income families. He serves on the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession, and organized a first-of-its-kind conference for economists from diverse backgrounds. As president of the National Economic Association, he’s working with the World Bank to improve career opportunities for economists from underrepresented groups.
Logan is committed to community service, too. He serves on the board of Magic Johnson Bridgescape, a local charter school for high school dropouts, and has been active with local organizations that are dedicated to HIV prevention.


CSMGEP Profiles: Trevon Logan
An Economist Who Profits From the Past
Trevon Logan, the Hazel C. Youngberg Trustees Distinguished Professor in the Department of Economics at The Ohio State University
Economic historian Trevon Logan has made his mark on a number of topics that don’t sound like they belong in the same sentence. Segregation, sports betting, sex markets.

Time and again, Logan has seen economics lose bright students to other STEM fields, where they have more representation and programming tailored to their interests.
“One thing we don’t talk enough about is the culture of the field, and the ways attitudes and experiences in the field can lead students to select out of it,” he says. “Economic history is probably the least diverse field of economics, full stop.”
As president of NEA, which supports minorities in the profession, he worked to increase research experiences for students of color and women. But despite a general focus on diversifying the pipeline into economics, Logan has long been conscious of how obstacles persist throughout a person’s career. During his tenure at the NEA, he organized a research conference for mid-career economists from underrepresented groups. Logan had watched many of his peers become stymied after receiving tenure, and wanted to boost professional development opportunities.
“Economists,” he jokes, “should be the most discerning of the market forces” that could draw someone away from the field. Like all topics that interest him, it is one Logan will continue to tackle.
(This post was last modified: 05-15-2017 02:07 PM by Bigdog731.)
05-15-2017 01:43 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
miko33 Offline
Defender of Honesty and Integrity
*

Posts: 9,768
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 394
I Root For: Alma Mater
Location:
Post: #53
RE: Michigan player calls out B1G Commish $20 Million Bonus...
(05-15-2017 08:32 AM)Frank the Tank Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 05:49 PM)Bigdog731 Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 09:34 AM)Frank the Tank Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 09:28 AM)Sactowndog Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 07:09 AM)murrdcu Wrote:  Not a smart move by B1G to announce a huge bonus to its executive. I think he's earned $20M, but to announce it like this sounds like a one time payment when it's supposedly going to be paid out over numerous years.

Student-athletes should be pissed.

If they want to start a rallying call, this is it.

Student athletes should be pissed?? How about regular students who have to take out loans to subsidize this ****?! Don't feel to bad for the athletes. My daughter between stipend payments and housing checks left college with 10K in the bank. Meanwhile many fellow students left with 100K in loans. If athletes manage money well they can leave with a nice bit of cash. My guess is the player complaining is one of the many football players that blow their money.

I understand this, but total amount isn't relevant. It's about whether you are getting paid in accordance with your market value. LeBron James might make over $20 million per year, but he's actually underpaid (as he would be making even more in a non-salary cap system), whereas there can be people making minimum wage that are overpaid relative to their market value. There are studies showing that the value of a 5-star recruit is close to $500,000 per year for a school, yet they're clearly not getting paid anywhere near that amount (at least above the board). The reason why shady boosters that pay players under the table exist is because everyone knows the true market value of these those players (and it exceeds the value of their scholarships).

Link for that study?

Here you go: an Ohio State professor study that was release at the end of 2016:

http://www.sbnation.com/college-football...ey-playoff

I'm constantly perplexed by why people want to curb the free market. Colleges and conferences should be free to make as much money as they want off of sports and they should be able to pay players what they're actually worth in the marketplace. It's what we expect of every single other industry in America, but many people have this blind spot about college sports because of outmoded ideas that these are somehow amateurs. Division I football and basketball players ARE professional athletes for all intents and purposes and it has been that way for a VERY long time. (Are we going to pretend that SMU in the 1980s was the first school to have boosters pay recruits because they're deemed to be so valuable?) Why do so many people have such a hard issue with either (a) admitting it or (b) fighting it? That never made sense to me.

Some comments

1) How much of a free market is it really? The vast majority of the NCAA schools are non profits that are answerable to the states these schools are located. You can't just start a FB program and expect to suddenly compete at any level you want. You have to be voted in basically. Plus do the players become employees of the universities? Does that mean academics get thrown out the window?

2) What kind of mechanism(s) would be put into place to ensure reasonable competition? If the players are to be paid, most likely wages will be capped. It will still be artificial. Otherwise, OSU and Michigan could out purchase most of the other schools in the B1G and other P5 schools - which would make recruiting even more lopsided in favor of the biggest/richest schools.
05-15-2017 01:50 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Tigeer Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 7,427
Joined: Aug 2004
Reputation: 122
I Root For: UoM & WVU
Location: Martinsville, VA
Post: #54
RE: Michigan player calls out B1G Commish $20 Million Bonus...
(05-14-2017 10:03 AM)bullet Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 09:34 AM)Frank the Tank Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 09:28 AM)Sactowndog Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 07:09 AM)murrdcu Wrote:  Not a smart move by B1G to announce a huge bonus to its executive. I think he's earned $20M, but to announce it like this sounds like a one time payment when it's supposedly going to be paid out over numerous years.

Student-athletes should be pissed.

If they want to start a rallying call, this is it.

Student athletes should be pissed?? How about regular students who have to take out loans to subsidize this ****?! Don't feel to bad for the athletes. My daughter between stipend payments and housing checks left college with 10K in the bank. Meanwhile many fellow students left with 100K in loans. If athletes manage money well they can leave with a nice bit of cash. My guess is the player complaining is one of the many football players that blow their money.

I understand this, but total amount isn't relevant. It's about whether you are getting paid in accordance with your market value. LeBron James might make over $20 million per year, but he's actually underpaid (as he would be making even more in a non-salary cap system), whereas there can be people making minimum wage that are overpaid relative to their market value. There are studies showing that the value of a 5-star recruit is close to $500,000 per year for a school, yet they're clearly not getting paid anywhere near that amount (at least above the board). The reason why shady boosters that pay players under the table exist is because everyone knows the true market value of these those players (and it exceeds the value of their scholarships).

There are really only a handful of players who are worth what they are getting now in terms of scholarship, coaching, training and exposure.

Wouldn't be surprised if there is a strike at some point and it marks the beginning of the end for college sports.

Zactly
05-15-2017 01:53 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Tigeer Offline
Heisman
*

Posts: 7,427
Joined: Aug 2004
Reputation: 122
I Root For: UoM & WVU
Location: Martinsville, VA
Post: #55
RE: Michigan player calls out B1G Commish $20 Million Bonus...
(05-14-2017 10:07 AM)Wedge Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 09:34 AM)Frank the Tank Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 09:28 AM)Sactowndog Wrote:  
(05-14-2017 07:09 AM)murrdcu Wrote:  Not a smart move by B1G to announce a huge bonus to its executive. I think he's earned $20M, but to announce it like this sounds like a one time payment when it's supposedly going to be paid out over numerous years.

Student-athletes should be pissed.

If they want to start a rallying call, this is it.

Student athletes should be pissed?? How about regular students who have to take out loans to subsidize this ****?! Don't feel to bad for the athletes. My daughter between stipend payments and housing checks left college with 10K in the bank. Meanwhile many fellow students left with 100K in loans. If athletes manage money well they can leave with a nice bit of cash. My guess is the player complaining is one of the many football players that blow their money.

I understand this, but total amount isn't relevant. It's about whether you are getting paid in accordance with your market value. LeBron James might make over $20 million per year, but he's actually underpaid (as he would be making even more in a non-salary cap system), whereas there can be people making minimum wage that are overpaid relative to their market value. There are studies showing that the value of a 5-star recruit is close to $500,000 per year for a school, yet they're clearly not getting paid anywhere near that amount (at least above the board). The reason why shady boosters that pay players under the table exist is because everyone knows the true market value of these those players (and it exceeds the value of their scholarships).

Exactly.

The last pick in the first round of the NFL draft gets a "rookie" contract worth about $9 million. No one can honestly argue that a player who is worth that much in April was only worth the price of a college scholarship in December.

The college teams reap the benefit of paying (almost) nothing for elite athletes whose market value is in the millions. The teams rake in the money while giving none of it to the athletes whose performances generate that money. That's why they have so much cash floating around that they can easily pay so many millions to coaches and commissioners.

Problem is most of these guys will not make it to the pros.
05-15-2017 01:54 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)


Copyright © 2002-2017 Collegiate Sports Nation Bulletin Board System (CSNbbs), All Rights Reserved.
CSNbbs is an independent fan site and is in no way affiliated to the NCAA or any of the schools and conferences it represents.
This site monetizes links. FTC Disclosure.
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2017 MyBB Group.