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1860 census
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1860 census
http://www.civil-war.net/pages/1860_census.html

Interesting data of the slave population and the % of families owning slaves.

The Deep South population was 44 (GA,AL)-57 (SC)% slaves. Slave ownership was 29% (LA) to 49% (MS).

The 4 border states slave population was 2% (DE) to 20% (KY) and
3 to 23% of families owning slaves.

For the 4 upper south states and Texas, the slave population was 25 (TN)-33 (NC) % and the ownerships was 20% (AR) to 28% (TX,NC).

The Deep South + recently annexed Texas seceded first. Arkansas with 20% was the only state to secede that had a lower % of slave owners than any of the non-seceding states. Kentucky had 23% while Missouri was 13% and Maryland 12%.
04-05-2016 02:19 PM
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HeartOfDixie Online
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RE: 1860 census
That's no surprise given the shift in slave population away from the coastal states and into the deep South in the decades leading up to the war.
04-05-2016 06:01 PM
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RE: 1860 census
(04-05-2016 06:01 PM)HeartOfDixie Wrote:  That's no surprise given the shift in slave population away from the coastal states and into the deep South in the decades leading up to the war.

I knew the population in the south was 1/3 slave, but previously didn't realize how big the slave population was in those deep south states.

It also tells you how many moved north for jobs. Those Black populations aren't nearly that high now.
04-06-2016 08:06 PM
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RE: 1860 census
If you want a good read on this I recommend "The Fall of the House of Dixie: The Civil War and the Social Revolution That Transformed the South". The author was an undergraduate professor of mine.

One of the interesting things examined in the book is how the minority slave owning class got the other 75% of the population in the South to go along with the "peculiar institution of slavery".
04-07-2016 08:12 AM
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RE: 1860 census
(04-07-2016 08:12 AM)CliftonAve Wrote:  If you want a good read on this I recommend "The Fall of the House of Dixie: The Civil War and the Social Revolution That Transformed the South". The author was an undergraduate professor of mine.

One of the interesting things examined in the book is how the minority slave owning class got the other 75% of the population in the South to go along with the "peculiar institution of slavery".

What was their opinion on that? I'm reading a book right now titled "What This Cruel War Was Over", published in 2007 I think. The research apparently concentrated on soldiers' letters, from both sides. I'm only a quarter of the way through the book (chronologically, about 1862) but 2 themes seem to be that 1) they were worried what would happen to their families if the slaves were suddenly free (suspected rampages by blacks, that is) and 2) that with slavery there was a class they were higher than, which would no longer be the case - the author seemed to say that this was an important consideration in the thinking at the time. They - the confederate soldiers - seemed to also think that the removal of slavery would damage the stability of the south (trying to paraphrase here, not doing a great job though lol).

And there was some about the northerners infecting the south with their very different ways of thinking. There doesn't seem to be much fear of the threat of the union army to their families or homes.

At least that's my impression so far.
(This post was last modified: 04-07-2016 04:56 PM by NIU007.)
04-07-2016 04:54 PM
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RE: 1860 census
(04-07-2016 04:54 PM)NIU007 Wrote:  
(04-07-2016 08:12 AM)CliftonAve Wrote:  If you want a good read on this I recommend "The Fall of the House of Dixie: The Civil War and the Social Revolution That Transformed the South". The author was an undergraduate professor of mine.

One of the interesting things examined in the book is how the minority slave owning class got the other 75% of the population in the South to go along with the "peculiar institution of slavery".

What was their opinion on that? I'm reading a book right now titled "What This Cruel War Was Over", published in 2007 I think. The research apparently concentrated on soldiers' letters, from both sides. I'm only a quarter of the way through the book (chronologically, about 1862) but 2 themes seem to be that 1) they were worried what would happen to their families if the slaves were suddenly free (suspected rampages by blacks, that is) and 2) that with slavery there was a class they were higher than, which would no longer be the case - the author seemed to say that this was an important consideration in the thinking at the time. They - the confederate soldiers - seemed to also think that the removal of slavery would damage the stability of the south (trying to paraphrase here, not doing a great job though lol).

And there was some about the northerners infecting the south with their very different ways of thinking. There doesn't seem to be much fear of the threat of the union army to their families or homes.

At least that's my impression so far.

They didn't want to bite the hand that fed them. Most of the non slave owners were doing commerce with the slave owners or alternatively worked for the slave owners.
The author also cited the reasons you mentioned.
04-08-2016 04:57 AM
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RE: 1860 census
Even more than slavery, there were two things that really created the war-John Y. Brown and Dred Scott. Dred Scott meant the North no longer had "states' rights." They couldn't keep slavery out as the slaveholders were forcing their views upon them. John Y. Brown was lauded across the North. He attacked a US Army outpost to steal guns to give to slaves to kill Whites in the South. With the North applauding terrorism, the South no longer trusted the North.

These census numbers show why there was such fear in the South of a slave revolt. In MS and SC slaves were a majority. And they were close to a majority in the other deep South states. If you took out mountainous areas, they probably were the majority.
04-10-2016 10:00 AM
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RE: 1860 census
(04-10-2016 10:00 AM)bullet Wrote:  Even more than slavery, there were two things that really created the war-John Y. Brown and Dred Scott. Dred Scott meant the North no longer had "states' rights." They couldn't keep slavery out as the slaveholders were forcing their views upon them. John Y. Brown was lauded across the North. He attacked a US Army outpost to steal guns to give to slaves to kill Whites in the South. With the North applauding terrorism, the South no longer trusted the North.

These census numbers show why there was such fear in the South of a slave revolt. In MS and SC slaves were a majority. And they were close to a majority in the other deep South states. If you took out mountainous areas, they probably were the majority.
Not to derail the census aspect of the discussion, but what I think is one of the more understudied topics of the Civil War era South is the way whites in these mountainous areas viewed the Confederacy and separation with the Union. Rebellion was a much more contentious topic in places like east TN, north GA, NE AL and what became West Virginia (obviously).

There is this view out there of some kind of "solid south" type movement toward secession. The reality was much more nuanced than that certain parts of the South.
04-10-2016 01:31 PM
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RE: 1860 census
(04-10-2016 01:31 PM)ArmyBlazer Wrote:  
(04-10-2016 10:00 AM)bullet Wrote:  Even more than slavery, there were two things that really created the war-John Y. Brown and Dred Scott. Dred Scott meant the North no longer had "states' rights." They couldn't keep slavery out as the slaveholders were forcing their views upon them. John Y. Brown was lauded across the North. He attacked a US Army outpost to steal guns to give to slaves to kill Whites in the South. With the North applauding terrorism, the South no longer trusted the North.

These census numbers show why there was such fear in the South of a slave revolt. In MS and SC slaves were a majority. And they were close to a majority in the other deep South states. If you took out mountainous areas, they probably were the majority.
Not to derail the census aspect of the discussion, but what I think is one of the more understudied topics of the Civil War era South is the way whites in these mountainous areas viewed the Confederacy and separation with the Union. Rebellion was a much more contentious topic in places like east TN, north GA, NE AL and what became West Virginia (obviously).

There is this view out there of some kind of "solid south" type movement toward secession. The reality was much more nuanced than that certain parts of the South.

East TN was one of the most unionist parts of the south and it got occupied by the Confederates until the end. Locals in North Georgia served as guides to Sherman as he headed to Atlanta.
04-11-2016 07:37 PM
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RE: 1860 census
(04-11-2016 07:37 PM)bullet Wrote:  
(04-10-2016 01:31 PM)ArmyBlazer Wrote:  
(04-10-2016 10:00 AM)bullet Wrote:  Even more than slavery, there were two things that really created the war-John Y. Brown and Dred Scott. Dred Scott meant the North no longer had "states' rights." They couldn't keep slavery out as the slaveholders were forcing their views upon them. John Y. Brown was lauded across the North. He attacked a US Army outpost to steal guns to give to slaves to kill Whites in the South. With the North applauding terrorism, the South no longer trusted the North.

These census numbers show why there was such fear in the South of a slave revolt. In MS and SC slaves were a majority. And they were close to a majority in the other deep South states. If you took out mountainous areas, they probably were the majority.
Not to derail the census aspect of the discussion, but what I think is one of the more understudied topics of the Civil War era South is the way whites in these mountainous areas viewed the Confederacy and separation with the Union. Rebellion was a much more contentious topic in places like east TN, north GA, NE AL and what became West Virginia (obviously).

There is this view out there of some kind of "solid south" type movement toward secession. The reality was much more nuanced than that certain parts of the South.

East TN was one of the most unionist parts of the south and it got occupied by the Confederates until the end. Locals in North Georgia served as guides to Sherman as he headed to Atlanta.
Yep, a lot of these people felt they were being drug into a war and expected to fight and die for something they never wanted. There are some fascinating stories about this region that get lost in the broader Civil War discussion.

The Lost State of Nickajack

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04-11-2016 08:14 PM
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