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Reopening our previous debate on nuclear power
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I45owl Offline
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Post: #151
RE: Reopening our previous debate on nuclear power
Here are some good articles describing the possibilities of a breach in reactor three. Contra-indicators are that the isotopes must have originated in the reactor, not the spent fuel pools, but the pressure readings make a breach unlikely. More likely is that there was a leak in the coolant pipes. The bottom line is that the news of the day indicates that there are dangers for the workers onsite, but I don't think this will affect anyone outside the reactor site... still not Chernobyl.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/envir...csp=34news
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/...8816.story

The following site quotes TEPCO (the isotopes I mentioned earlier are not listed):

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident – 26 March status « BraveNewClimate

http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/26/fu...ch-status/ Wrote:(2) High radiation water may come from the unit 3 reactor, not spent fuel pool.

As for the leakage of radioactive materials at Unit 3 turbine building, we assume the water came from the reactor. We collected sample of the contaminated water in the turbine building of Unit 3 and conducted the gamma-emitting nuclide analysis. We confirmed the following nuclides with short half-life.

Nuclides half-life (days) density (bq/cubic centimeter)
Iodine 131 8.06 1.2 x 10E6
Cesium 136 13.16 2.3 x 10E4
Barium 140 12.75 5.2 x 10E4

There are 148 fuel rods with less than one year of cooling period in the spent fuel pool at Unit 3. Those fuel rods were transferred to the spent fuel pool between Jun 23 and 28, 2010 having had more than 200 days of cooling period. Nuclides with short half-life had sufficient time for decay in the spent fuel pool, so it seems possible that the contaminated water in the turbine building is from the reactor.

We do not deny possibility that there might be certain damage to the reactor of Unit 3. Even should that be the case, as plant parameters such as the reactor pressure and D/W pressure is stable , we presume that RPV is not seriously damaged.

We are injecting seawater and from the night of March 25, fresh water into the reactor. The water turns into steam and comes out from the reactor vessel through the SRV, then depressurized at the suppression chamber and condensed to water. This flow of water is cooling the reactor. Having experienced fluctuations of temperature and pressure, the containment function might be loosened somewhere. In any event, the above is a possibility, not yet confirmed.

[Image: slide_LWRfuelComp.png]

edit: added the nuclear composition chart above from EnergyFromThorium.com
(This post was last modified: 03-26-2011 12:38 AM by I45owl.)
03-26-2011 12:10 AM
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I45owl Offline
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Post: #152
RE: Reopening our previous debate on nuclear power
(03-25-2011 12:21 PM)Brookes Owl Wrote:  From the log: "...seawater injection continues..." How does this work? Where's the "spent" seawater going?

Here is the IAEA report on seawater contamination. It does not look like the waste water is going right back into the sea...

There may be runoff pools onsite ... I still don't really know.

Fukushima Nuclear Accident Update Log

http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsun...ate01.html Wrote:Radioactive Materials Found in Japanese Seawater Sampling -- UPDATED

Japanese authorities today reported data on radiation samples collected 30 kilometres off shore of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on 24 March, and the levels of iodine-131 and cesium-137 showed slight variations from data collected at the same locations on 23 March (see previous update.

A vessel from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) collected water samples at eight points 30 kilometres from the coastline and found measurable concentrations of iodine-131 and cesium-137. The iodine concentrations measured were about at Japanese regulatory limits, and the cesium levels were well below those limits.

The IAEA’s Marine Environmental Laboratory in Monaco has received the data and offered this preliminary analysis:

Dilution, both into deeper layers and by dispersion along the prevailing ocean currents will lead to a rapid decrease of the initial surface contamination.

For the short term, iodine-131 will be the relevant radionuclide as far as doses are concerned, but for the long term, cesium-137 will be the more important radionuclide in the marine environment. It will be possible to follow this nuclide over long distances for several years.

It can be expected that radionuclides will take months or years to reach other shores of the Pacific. The main transport of contamination takes place by atmospheric transport over long distances.
03-26-2011 01:05 AM
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